Daily trivia: 11 walks, zero runs

572176.jpg

Daily trivia: 11 walks, zero runs

Every weekday throughout the offseason, CSN White Sox Talk will pass along three completely trivial (but hopefully interesting) tidbits from White Sox history. Most of these notes come from Baseball-Reference's Play Index. Today, we look at pitchers who were afraid or not allowed to pitch to Frank Thomas.

10: The number of walks Gary Peters allowed on Sept. 13, 1967. He pitched an 11-inning complete game, struck out seven, allowed one hit and no runs. That walk total is the highest for any White Sox pitcher who allowed no runs in an outing. Peters only induced three double plays and didn't pick anyone off in the start, which is somewhat surprising given the shutout.

3: The number of times Jose Contreras walked at least five in a start an escaped without allowing a run. No other White Sox pitcher this decade can say they've done that. Two of those starts came in 2007, Contreras' worst year in a Sox uniform, but on Sept. 7, 2005, Contreras walked five over 7 23 innings without allowing a run in a 1-0 win over Kansas City.

12: The most number of walks a White Sox pitcher has ever allowed in a game, that dozen coming from the right arm of Vallie Eaves on April 22, 1940 against Detroit. Eaves threw 7 23 innings, allowing four runs (three earned) and struck out seven with those 12 free passes.

Bonus: No White Sox pitcher has walked eight or more opponents in a game since Scott Eyre walked eight Angels on May 12, 1998. The last White Sox pitcher to walk seven in a start is Jake Peavy, who allowed seven walks, hits and runs against the Rays April 22, 2010.

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

On his 24th birthday, Tim Anderson’s present from home plate umpire Jim Wolf was his first major-league ejection.

In the fifth inning of the White Sox 3-0 loss to the Oakland Athletics, Anderson fouled off a pitch that landed in the opposing batter’s box. But A’s catcher Bruce Maxwell picked it up in what was ruled to be fair territory and threw the ball to first for the out.

Anderson pleaded his case saying the ball went foul. Wolf agreed, according to Anderson, which only further confused the White Sox shortstop.

“I told him that was BS,” Anderson said. “And he tossed me.”

Anderson said that he was surprised to be ejected so fast. So was manager Rick Renteria, who was thrown out moments after Anderson.

“I don’t want to get in trouble,” Renteria said. “The players having emotion, they are battling. I just think we need to grow a little thicker skin.”

Anderson said that he was appreciative of his manager coming to his defense.

“He kinda had a point and let me know he had my back,” Anderson said of Renteria. “Speaks a lot of him.”

A day after scoring nine runs on 18 hits, the White Sox failed to generate any offense on Friday. The team’s best chance came in the ninth inning.

But with runners at the corners and two outs, Matt Davidson put a good rip on the ball to center field, only to fly out at the warning track.

Anderson and Renteria were watching the game together in the clubhouse, and both believed the White Sox had tied the ballgame.

“We all jumped up and were excited but it kind of fell short,” Anderson said.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Exclusive interview with Mark Buehrle

buehrle.jpg
USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Exclusive interview with Mark Buehrle

On the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast, Chuck Garfien goes 1-on-1 with the star of the weekend, Mark Buehrle.

Buehrle tells an absolutely amazing bachelor party story and discloses why he wore No. 56.

Take a trip down memory lane and listen to the White Sox Talk Podcast here