On the Farm: Gilmore comfortable with Sox

On the Farm: Gilmore comfortable with Sox

Friday, Aug. 6, 2010
3:10 PM

By Kevin T. Czerwinski
CSNChicago.com

Jon Gilmore admits that 2009 was a bit of a tumultuous season for him. It was his first year with the White Sox and he was pushing just a bit too hard in an effort to impress his new team, the one that had traded for him in December 2008.

Gilmore, whom Atlanta made the 33rd overall pick in the 2007 First-Year Player Draft, was just beginning to feel as if he fit in with the Braves, that he belonged at the time of the deal. He had spent a year and a half in Atlantas system, hit .291 over that stretch and rose out of the Gulf Coast League to the South Atlantic League in just over a season, offering glimpses of the hitter the Braves figured he would become after they expended such a lofty pick to get him.

Then came that early December day in 2008 when he learned that he had been traded to the White Sox, along with Tyler Flowers, Brent Lillibridge and Santos Rodriguez. The Braves, seeking to recapture some of the glory they experienced through much of the 90s, picked up Javier Vazquez and Boone Logan in the deal.

It really surprised me, Gilmore, 21, said of the deal. I know that it is part of the game. My brother-in-law Ben Zobrist got traded, too. So it means that someone wants you. But it was a surprise.

And last year, after I got traded, I wanted to make a good impression on the team that I got traded, too. That was a big part of last year. I had just gotten comfortable with the Braves and had just gotten comfortable with their staff. It was a huge change and I was starting the process over. So I put a lot of pressure on myself early on to show them who I was.

Gilmore began the season by going 0-for-18 and 5-for-48 before leveling off. The third baseman ended up hitting .274 with 67 RBIs for Kannapolis, solid numbers for the South Atlantic League but not the type of numbers expected of a top draft pick.

This season, well, lets just say things have been a little different. Gilmore is leading or close to leading the Carolina League in several categories at Winston-Salem. Hes leading the league in hits (151), at-bats (450) and games played (106). Gilmore is second on the circuit in hitting (.336) -- hes one of three WS players in the top five in that category -- and is third in runs scored 68 and fourth in total bases 190.

Heading into Fridays action, Gilmore was also riding a six-game hitting streak during which he was hitting .375 9-for-24.

Im just confident in myself this season, Gilmore said. I did a lot of work and I found a comfortable swing and I have been able to repeat it during the course of the season. It helps when youre doing well and you have that consistent swing. Ive tweaked a little bit and it has helped a lot. Ive had a good swing all year.

Ive had three or four different swings the last few years and this year Ive stayed with the same approach on my swing all year and it has helped. I have pregame stuff that I work on and I take a lot of pride in that, having the same approach every day. It really helps over the course of the season.

Gilmore added that having former big-leaguer Joe McEwing as his manager has made a big difference as well. Super Joe was a scrapper during his playing days and earned his nickname as a result of his hard work, approach and determination to show up at the park every day ready to contribute.

McEwing has imparted some of that approach on Gilmore over the last four-plus months.

When he talks, you want to listen and learn from a guy like that, Gilmore said.

Folks should be listening to Gilmore before long. Theyre already watching him and they are impressed. Dont be too surprised if he gets a taste of life in Birmingham before the season is over if for no other reason that to spice up what has been a miserable season for the Barons.

The management of the White Sox has a plan for everyone, Gilmore said. Im just going to do what they tell me. The only thing I can do is keep playing well and to the best of my ability and let them make the decision for me.

Kevin Czerwinski can be reached at ktczerwinski@gmail.com.

White Sox agree to one-year deals with Brett Lawrie, Avisail Garcia

White Sox agree to one-year deals with Brett Lawrie, Avisail Garcia

Brett Lawrie and Avisail Garcia will both return to the White Sox in 2017.

The team announced it reached deals with both players shortly before Friday’s 7 p.m. CST nontender deadline. Lawrie will earn $3.5 million next season and Garcia received a one-year deal for $3 million.

The club didn’t tender a contract to right-handed pitcher Blake Smith, which leaves its 40-man roster at 38.

Acquired last December for a pair of minor leaguers, Lawrie hit .248/.310/.413 with 12 home runs, 22 doubles and 36 RBIs in 94 games before he suffered a season-ending injury.

Lawrie produced 0.9 f-WAR when he suffered what then-manager Robin Ventura described a “tricky” injury on July 21. Despite numerous tests and a lengthy rehab, Lawrie never returned to the field and was frustrated by the experience. Last month, Lawrie tweeted that he believes the cause of his injury was wearing orthotics for the first time in his career.

He was projected to earn $5.1 million, according to MLBTraderumors.com and earned $4.125 million in 2016.

Garcia hit .245/.307/.385 with 12 homers and 51 RBIs in 453 plate appearances over 120 games. The projected salary for Garcia, arb-eligible for the first time, was $3.4 million.

The team also offered contracts to Miguel Gonzalez and Todd Frazier, who are eligible for free agency in 2018, first baseman Jose Abreu and relievers Dan Jennings, Zach Putnam and Jake Petricka, among others.

The White Sox have until mid-January to reach an agreement with their arbitration-eligible players. If they haven’t, both sides submit figures for arbitration cases, which are then heard throughout February.

White Sox announcer Jason Benetti cracks Crain's 40 under 40

White Sox announcer Jason Benetti cracks Crain's 40 under 40

Crain's Chicago Business released its latest 40 under 40 project and White Sox announcer Jason Benetti made this year's list.

The 33-year-old just finished his first season with the White Sox as play-by-play announcer, working the home games at U.S. Cellular Field (before it was renamed Guaranteed Rate Field last month) alongside Steve Stone as longtime broadcaster Hawk Harrelson saw his workload reduced to mostly road games.

Benetti quickly became a fan favorite among Chicagoans on CSN and other networks in 2016 and his cerebral palsy became more of a backstory, with his work alongside Stone and his affable sense of humor taking center stage instead.

Among other topics, Benetti discussed how he approaches his job of broadcasting for the team he grew up rooting for:

Law school taught me that there are always two sides of the argument. I see it from the Sox prism, but I can’t believe in my heart of hearts that, if the Sox lose, the world’s over anymore. That first game, I was like, “All right, it’s just a game.” And then Avi Garcia hits a homer late in the game against the Indians and I call it like I would call it with a little more. And as the ball cleared the fence, when it was rolling around, I got a slight tear in my eye. And I was like, “What’s that?”

Check out the entire interview with Benetti and the full list at ChicagoBusiness.com.