Flowers' first appearance goes well

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Flowers' first appearance goes well

Tyler Flowers posed for pictures, shook hands and received sound advice from White Sox fans at the Palmer House Hilton on Friday night.

Save for a few pithy remarks, Flowers first appearance as A.J. Pierzynskis heir apparent was smooth.

The White Sox catcher knows it will be difficult to replace Pierzynski, a South Side fan favorite who signed with the Texas Rangers this offseason. But for Flowers to get what he desires most -- an everyday catching job -- he will have to do just that, and hes ready for a chance.

Someone has got to be that guy, Flowers said. Its a challenge; another something to go along with the story. But it really has no affect on me. You wouldnt wish it for anybody, but thats what the situation is.

While one question directed at general manager Rick Hahn in his SoxFest seminar on Friday was whether or not the team is better off without Pierzynski, White Sox decision makers are confident they have made the right choice.

The two-time top-100 Baseball America prospect was the top minor-leaguer the White Sox received in a December 2008 deal that sent Javier Vazquez to Atlanta and they intend to give him a try. Though he hasnt been handed the job, Flowers is the clear favorite with spring camp 2 12 weeks away.

Were going to give Tyler his shot, Hahn said. Nows his opportunity, his chance to fulfill a lot of the promise that we saw. Were not going to bring in someone to push it or enforce it.

Flowers has already earned the respect of his teammates and coaches. Pitchers are on board with his receiving and defensive skills and his arm. Manager Robin Venturas coaching staff appreciates how Flowers, as asked, focused on his catching duties and didnt fret over his offensive struggles in limited plate appearances last season. Players know hes a hard worker, whether its conditioning, refining his defense or pre-game preparation.

Tyler's no slouch behind the plate, pitcher Chris Sale said. He works hard, he studies video, he looks at -- he's got 15 sheets of paper on the desk before a start. He prepares with the best of them and behind the plate he's awesome. I think with some consistent at-bats we're going to see a different guy this year. If there's anybody to step up and fill that void, it's him.

Still, Flowers, his teammates and coaches are aware fans will make a big deal of the fact Pierzynski is gone after eight seasons. They know the diehards are disappointed Pierzynski wont return after he slugged a career-high 27 home runs last season. The trick is -- and Flowers said it wont be a problem -- to not make the season about Pierzynski. Manager Robin Ventura has a plan in place.

I want him to just be prepared to do his job, Ventura said. He doesnt have to do his job and the perceptions of somebody elses job. Nobody knows what that would have been. Nobodys numbers are guaranteed. Its about going in at spring training and doing the work and thats for me to keep him focused on simple stuff, not thinking about outside pressures and expectations that somebody else has.

All Flowers would like is a chance.

He doesnt expect to waltz in and immediately win over the fan base. Thanks to several autograph seekers on Friday, Flowers knows I have big shoes to fill. He isnt going to be the same guy at the plate. Flowers will strike out more often than Pierzynski and wont hit .300. But he does offer big power and plans to make himself invaluable through his defensive play and hard work.

As long as hes given a fair shot, Flowers has no complaints.

Im going to strike out a lot more than he did, Flowers said. So we can go ahead and get over that. Its going to happen. I hope the stats look good at the end of the year. But the biggest thing is catching and handling the staff. I think (fans are) going to be open enough to give me a shot at it. Thats all I want. All I wanted was an opportunity. Its all on my shoulders now to do what Im capable of.

Nick Delmonico takes advantage of fresh start with White Sox

Nick Delmonico takes advantage of fresh start with White Sox

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Given he was almost out of baseball just two years ago, White Sox farmhand Nick Delmonico never imagined he’d be where he is now.

But the former Baltimore Orioles/Milwaukee Brewers prospect feels like he has rid himself of the off-the-field issues that stunted development early in his career.

In 2014, Delmonico served a suspension for unauthorized use of Adderall and later asked for and was granted his release by Milwaukee. Now with a fresh start with the White Sox, he heads into the final week of camp with an outside shot at the roster. Though he’s likely to start the season at Triple-A Charlotte, Delmonico knows he has made tremendous progress both on and off the field the past two years.

“I definitely did not see this,” Delmonico said. “I’m very blessed to be here.

“It feels awesome. It feels like I’ve accomplished a lot just in my life to get here. Just being around my teammates is one of the biggest things I enjoy every day, just coming to the ballpark. I’m very happy and honored to be able to come here everyday.”

The White Sox weren’t sure what to expect when they signed Delmonico, 24, to a minor league deal on Feb. 11, 2015. A sixth-round pick by the Orioles in 2011, Delmonico received a $1.525 million signing bonus. He was traded to Milwaukee in July 2013 in exchange for closer Francisco Rodriguez.

Delmonico received a 50-game suspension for Adderall in 2014, which he told the Charlotte News Observer he’d used since high school for attention deficit disorder (ADD). Delmonico told the Observer he informed Milwaukee that he no longer wanted to play baseball, changed his phone number and asked for his release. He was placed on the restricted list on July 28 and never played in the Brewers farm system again.

The White Sox signed Delmonico seven months after his final game with Milwaukee and he returned to the field that June.

Delmonico requested privacy when asked about switching teams but acknowledged, “I had some past issues with some stuff that I’d like to keep to myself,” he said.

Delmonico started the 2015 season at Single-A Kannapolis and was promoted a week later to Double-A Birmingham. He finished the season with a .733 OPS and made an additional 76 plate appearances at the Arizona Fall League.

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Last season, Delmonico combined to hit .279/.347/.490 with 17 homers between Double-A Birmingham and Triple-A Charlotte in 110 games. That earned him an invite to big league camp, where Delmonico has displayed a swing refined the past two seasons.

Current third-base coach and former director of player development Nick Capra said Delmonico has worked hard to go from a pull hitter to one who uses the entire field. He entered Sunday hitting .268/.328/.589 with nine extra-base hits this spring in a team-high 61 plate appearance this spring.

“This kid has made a complete turnaround from when we first got him in camp,” Capra said. “He’s done everything. He’s done probably more than we expected him to do. He’s in a really great place. He has a personality that people kind of gravitate to and it’s been a blessing to have him around and see the smile on his face when he comes to work every day.”

Originally a third baseman, the White Sox have moved Delmonico around this spring. He’s logged time at first base and also in the outfield as they try to improve his versatility. If Delmonico performs well at Charlotte, there’s no reason he couldn’t eventually find his way to Chicago and succeed in the big leagues.

“We’re continuing to try to explore his ability to play third base,” manager Rick Renteria said. “He can obviously play first. We’ve started using him in left field. He’s a young man that has a bat to carry. Can hit the ball out of the ballpark. Gives you good at-bats. There’s something to him about his personality and the way he carries himself, which is infectious, which we like.”

Delmonico praised the family-feel that has been prominent in the White Sox clubhouse this spring. He had some jitters coming into his first big league camp but hasn’t allowed them to hinder anything.

He likes how Renteria and his staff have brought a young group of players together. And best of all, he’s happy to be in the right place to enjoy the experience.

“It definitely gives you confidence what you do here,” Delmonico said. “You’ve got to keep moving forward. The biggest thing for big league camp for me is learning as much as I can from everybody. And learning from myself, I’ve been able to handle things and try to pick up as much as I can.”

Rule 5 pick Dylan Covey takes advantage of showcase as White Sox down Indians

Rule 5 pick Dylan Covey takes advantage of showcase as White Sox down Indians

GOODYEAR, Ariz. — If Carlos Rodon starts on the disabled list as expected, the White Sox won't turn to any of their vaunted top prospects in the interim.

The news on Rodon has been encouraging so far as no structural damage has been discovered. Still, the White Sox won't clear Rodon until after he receives a second opinion on Monday. While the length of Rodon's absence won't be determined for several days, the White Sox are certain of one route they won't take — they don't want to disrupt the development of their young starting pitchers. Were a DL trip for Rodon necessary, the White Sox would likely select either Saturday's starter, Dylan Covey, or minor leaguer David Holmberg over their top prospects. Covey made a strong impression on Saturday afternoon with 3 2/3 scoreless innings pitched and the White Sox rallied for a 10-7 victory over the Cleveland Indians at Goodyear Ballpark.

"When you have an opportunity to stabilize action or movement for players it serves them better," White Sox manager Rick Renteria said. "They get a little more comfortable where they're at. They get comfortable with the staffs they're working with and the information they're gathering, being in a routine. It is a little disruptive going from team to team to team. It happens, but it's not the most conducive (to learning)."

The White Sox are all about development this season. Therefore, they have no plans to call upon Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez, Carson Fulmer or Michael Kopech unless they're A) ready and B) throwing every fifth day in Chicago. Renteria's comments Saturday reiterated Rick Hahn's earlier message, saying the club doesn't want to disrupt the development path.

That puts Covey, a Rule 5 draft pick in December, with a decent opportunity to make the club out of camp. Covey commanded the strike zone on Saturday only hours after Renteria said he hoped to see the young right-hander replicate an Arizona Fall League performance that initially warmed the White Sox up to him.

Aside from a two-out walk in his final inning, Covey was sharp the whole way. He allowed three hits and struck out three.

"My last couple of outings I was definitely feeling the stress," Covey said. "I was kind of pitching a little passive, pitching to not make a mistake instead of just going right after guys. So today and yesterday I just thought I'm just going to throw every pitch with conviction and see what happens. I got a lot of weak contact today and some swings and misses, so I felt good."

Covey threw 44 pitches, 27 for strikes. He potentially could stay in Arizona on Thursday and make an additional minor league start to build arm strength, which would get him to roughly 60 pitches before the regular seasons started.

The White Sox don't officially need a fifth starter until April 9 and they're off the following day. That break could allow the White Sox to start Covey as part of a bullpen day. Covey said he recently changed his mindset after lackluster results in relief this spring. The right-hander has a 6.94 ERA this spring in 11 2/3 innings.

"Obviously my last two outings out of the pen I wasn't getting crushed, but I just wasn't commanding the ball or commanding the count as much as I would like to be," Covey said. "The mistakes get hit a little harder when you're falling behind in the count. Today I wanted to have the mindset of attacking hitters, throwing everything down in the zone and going right after them, and it worked out."

The White Sox blasted six home runs in the contest, including a majestic, go-ahead grand slam by first baseman Danny Hayes in the top of the ninth inning. Hayes is hitting .351/.400/.595 with two homers and is tied for the team lead with 13 RBIs this spring. Jose Abreu, Nick Delmonico, Cody Asche, Everth Cabrera and Jacob May also homered for the White Sox.