Chicago White Sox

Four-run fourth hangs White Sox out to dry

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Four-run fourth hangs White Sox out to dry

Saturday, April 16, 2011
Posted: April 15, 10:48 p.m. Updated: 12:19 a.m.

Associated Press

Caught in a rain delay but not ready to leave the game, Jered Weaver had to improvise.

After play was halted in the sixth inning, Weaver put some heat packs on his arm, threw his No. 42 jersey in the dryer because there wasn't a spare around, then played catch in the hallway outside the clubhouse.

When Weaver came back, he wasn't as sharp as before, but he - with some help from the Angels' bullpen - was good enough to lead Los Angeles to a 4-3 win over the Chicago White Sox on Friday night

"That was kind of weird," Weaver said. "You can have a half-hour inning sometimes. It wasn't too bad. Just came up here and tried to stay warm."

Weaver stayed in the game, but gave up a two-run homer to Adam Dunn just two batters after retaking the mound.

"He doesn't miss many mistakes and that was a mistake on my part," Weaver said. "He put it where he should have. That's what he does."

The Angels bullpen extended its scoreless streak to 25 13 innings behind Weaver (4-0) to seal the win.

Fernando Rodney worked out of trouble with two on and one out in the eighth and Jordan Walden worked a perfect ninth to preserve the win for Weaver, the first in the majors to reach four wins.

"We've got some guys who can throw the heck of the ball," Weaver said. "I'll take any of those guys coming in after me and they were able to get the job done tonight."

Maicer Izturis had three hits and drove in two runs Friday to help Angels win their third straight and seventh in the last nine games.

Weaver (4-0) allowed three runs on four hits to earn the win. Two of the runs were earned. The 2010 strikeout leader added four to his 2011 total and leads the majors with 31 this season.

Filling in for the injured Jake Peavy, Phil Humber (1-1) took the loss for Chicago. He was charged with four runs over his five innings of work, but only two of the runs were earned. Humber struck out four and gave up six hits, but was hit hard all night.

"It was a battle," he said. "I didn't have control of most of my pitches for the most part."

Weaver retired the first six batters he faced, but found trouble in the third inning. He hit A.J. Pierzynski in the back on a 1-2 pitch to lead off and Alexei Ramirez blooped a single into shallow center field to put runners on first and second.

Brent Morel then botched a bunt, popping out to catcher Hank Conger. Juan Pierre followed with a fly out to left field, but Weaver couldn't escape unscathed. Gordon Beckham ripped a 1-1 pitch into left field to drive in Pierzynski. Weaver rebounded to strike out Dunn for the second time.

The Angels responded immediately with a four-run fourth. After a one-out walk to Vernon Wells and a single by Alberto Callaspo, Humber allowed an RBI single to Mark Trumbo. Conger then grounded softly to third with runners on first and third, but a wide throw by Morel allowed a run to score and set the stage for a two-run double off the bat of Izturis, his third hit in four innings, to give Los Angeles a 4-1 lead.

In addition to the delay in the sixth, there was a brief pause in the ninth as the Angels took the field for the bottom half.

Players briefly took shelter in the dugout, but reappeared just a minute later, before the grounds crew could take out the tarp, and began warming up again. Play resumed after just a three-minute delay.

"That's April baseball. You go on the road, you don't know what the elements are going to bring," Angels manager Mike Scioscia said.

NOTES

In honor of Jackie Robinson Day, Robinson's granddaughter, Sonia Pankey, threw out the first pitch. ... Angels RHP Joel Pineiro (right shoulder tendinitis) threw a 30-pitch bullpen session in Arizona Friday. "He still has work to do," Scioscia said. ... Angels LHP Scott Kazmir (lower back soreness) is working out in Houston but will join the team Monday for a three-game series in Arlington against the Texas Rangers. ... White Sox LHP Will Ohman struck out Izturis with the bases loaded and two out in the eighth.

Box Score
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White Sox Talk Podcast: Carlos Rodon on being new and improved, Dan Hayes with farm system findings

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Carlos Rodon on being new and improved, Dan Hayes with farm system findings

Carlos Rodon comes on the podcast with Chuck Garfien to talk about his White Sox past, present and future.

He discusses his bicep injury which forced him to miss the first three months of the season and might end up being a blessing in disguise for his career. He talks about the pitch he threw that caused the Cubs Kris Bryant to be ejected earlier this season, why he wants to be a top tier pitcher like Chris Sale and Clayton Kershaw, if it would have been better for him to play more in the minor leagues before being called up to the majors and why the White Sox rebuild is headed in the right direction and more.

Then Dan Hayes from CSN Chicago joins the podcast to talk about his trip through the White Sox farm system. They discuss the surprise Michael Kopech promotion to Triple-A, joining the Nicky Delmonico Fan Club, how Casey Gillaspie is nothing like his brother Conor and why White Sox fans should look out for Jake Peter, who is tearing it up for the Charlotte Knights and more. 

Listen to the White Sox Talk Podcast below! 

 

Young White Sox pitchers offering 'a glimpse of what's to come'

Young White Sox pitchers offering 'a glimpse of what's to come'

Carlos Rodon is on a roll, Carson Fulmer made his first big league start and Lucas Giolito’s White Sox premiere is on deck. With Reynaldo Lopez already in the majors and Michael Kopech now at Triple-A Charlotte, the first wave of the White Sox pitching future is on hand.

Rodon turned in another good outing to help the White Sox to a split of Monday’s doubleheader against the Minnesota Twins at Guaranteed Rate Field. The third-year starter overcame a slow start and delivered 6 1/3 strong innings in a 7-6 victory in Game 1 at Guaranteed Rate Field. While Fulmer was knocked out after only 1 1/3 innings in the nightcap, White Sox manager Rick Renteria is enthusiastic to see that several of his young pitchers have reached their final stage of development.

“It's a glimpse of what's to come,” Renteria said. “I think they should be excited. We're excited to finally get to have them here with us and start to see them a little bit more and we can start to gauge where we're at, where they are in their development. We look forward kind of starting to scratch the surface of what's coming in the future.”

The White Sox need look no further than Rodon’s own path to identify how a young pitcher’s development can zig and zag. The third pick of the 2014 amateur draft raced through the minor leagues, struggled with command once he arrived in the majors, found some solid footing late in the 2015 season, battled again early in 2016 before he righted the ship over the final two months. And that’s before Rodon spent three months on the disabled list with a sore left shoulder and had command issues when he returned nearly two months ago.

But now, Rodon is on yet another of those rolls in which he appears to be a front-of-the-rotation starter. His re-emergence has yet again presented the White Sox with hope that Rodon can front the new wave of starting pitchers. After Monday’s effort, Rodon has five straight quality starts with a 2.25 ERA and 36 strikeouts over his last 36 innings.

Even so, Rodon knows he has more work ahead to get where he wants.

“There’s still stuff to work on,” Rodon said. “There’s stuff I need to get better at and more strikes, more command and trying to get back to that no walk thing.”

The White Sox understood they needed to be patient with Rodon and are even more aware of how they’ll need to be now that Giolito, Lopez and Fulmer have reached their final stages of development.

Fulmer, who was up for the day as the team’s 26th man, is headed back to Charlotte. As much as he struggled in his first chance, Fulmer — who allowed two three-run homers — is almost certain to get another down the road. Even if it never pans out as a starter, Fulmer almost certainly would be given a chance to succeed in relief.

“I guess perhaps we have a longer-term view of a given player, more rope so to speak, to prove who they are, show who they are over an extended period at the big-league level,” general manager Rick Hahn said earlier this month.

The same goes for Lopez, who appears to be improving after he was placed on the DL with a strained back, and Giolito, who has shown a vast improvement after a slow start at Triple-A Charlotte. The team announced he and reliever Brad Goldberg were headed back to Triple-A following the game. The option of Goldberg makes room for Giolito, who will be added to the 25-man on Tuesday.

“I’m still confident in my ability to go out there and throw strikes and help us win,” Fulmer said. “I’m always going to continue to learn. That’s never going to stop for me as a baseball player and I have to go through these experiences to get better as a baseball player and as a pitcher. Take the positive out of this outing and learn from what happened to tonight.”

The White Sox went into their rebuild with the long-term approach in mind, knowing how critical it was to develop. For Giolito, it was regaining the confidence that had him rated as the top pitching prospect in baseball headed into last winter.

Whether it’s simplifying his thought process, trusting his routine between starts or finding confidence in his curveball, Giolito knows he’s in a better place as he makes his first White Sox start since they acquired him last December. After posting a 5.40 ERA in his first 16 starts at Charlotte, Giolito has rebounded with a 2.78 ERA in the last eight turns he has made.

“Started out pretty rough,” Giolito said last week. “Certain times where it’s like, ‘What do I have to do? What do I need to work on?’ And then finally putting together a really, really solid routine — certain drills, certain things I’m doing every day to better myself and trusting it.

“The results are starting to come with that and I feel like I’m much better off than I was in the beginning of the year and the confidence is much better.”

Having worked with them in a spring training and later spent a month in the minors on his rehab assignment, Rodon has anticipated the arrivals of Lopez, Giolito and Fulmer. He’s excited to see what everyone can do and how they handle their on-the-job training.

“It’s fun for these guys to be back up here and part of this team again,” Rodon said. “It was good to be down there and watch them. It’s time to watch them grow up and play in the big leagues.”