Chicago White Sox

Humber labors as Sox fall to Indians

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Humber labors as Sox fall to Indians

Philip Humber has hardly been perfect since his April 21 start. After being torched by Boston for the most runs (9) ever allowed in a start following a perfect game, Humber issued six walks in six innings as the White Sox lost 6-3 to Cleveland Wednesday night.

He only allowed three of those runs, though, and it easily could've been better. With two outs in the fifth, Travis Hafner hit a smash to Gordon Beckham that skirted under the second baseman's glove and into right field.

Three pitches later, Carlos Santana swatted a hanging slider 430 feet into the right field seats for a three-run home run.

Along the same vein, Humber's start could've been much worse. He loaded the bases twice in the first three innings, wriggling out of both jams with strikeouts of Shin-Soo Choo.

While the free passes Humber issued were a concern, it's important to note the Indians entered Wednesday as the most proficient walk-drawing offense in the majors. Just over 12 percent of Cleveland's cumulative plate appearances have resulted in a walk, nearly two percent higher than the second-highest team in that regard (Tampa Bay, 10.5 percent). Still, Humber has now walked a total of 12 batters over 16 13 innings in his non-perfect starts.

The Sox offense was buoyed by an early solo blast off the bat of Adam Dunn, his sixth on the season. With it, Dunn surpassed half of his 2011 home run output less than one full month into the 2012 season. Alexei Ramirez tied the game up in the fifth with a two-run single.

Cleveland took the lead in the top of the eighth with a two-out rally against Will Ohman and Addison Reed. After Michael Brantley singled and Casey Kotchman walked with two out against Ohman, Jack Hannahan doubled down the left field line off Reed to score Brantley, who turned out to be the game-winning run.

Travis Hafner added a two-run homer off Matt Thornton in the ninth to give Chris Perez a comfortable save.

Forget about it: Yoan Moncada's ability to play through mistakes

Forget about it: Yoan Moncada's ability to play through mistakes

Yoan Moncada could have mentally taken himself out of Friday’s game in the third inning.

The White Sox prized prospect booted a routine groundball in the frame, contributing to a long, damaging Royals rally. A few singles, a Tim Anderson error and five runs later, it seemed as if the inning would never end on the South Side.

Mercifully, the Sox were finally able to return to their dugout because Moncada refocused and refused to allow one physical error to compound. 

The skilled second baseman ranged up the middle to scoop a hard-hit Brandon Moss grounder, preventing any further damage. One inning later, he pummeled a two-run blast to center to give the White Sox the lead for good.

It’s that type of short-term memory that has impressed the Sox in his first major league showing with the club.

"I don't think he consumes himself too much in the mistake,” Rick Renteria said after the 7-6 win. “Maybe he's just thinking about what he's trying to do the next time."

Moncada’s quite polished for a 22-year-old infielder who hasn’t even played a full season in the majors. His athletic ability allows him to make the highlight-reel plays frequently, so now it's about continuing to work on his fundamentals. 

“He's really improved significantly since he's gotten here,” Renteria said. “Not trying to be too flashy. The great plays that he makes just take care of themselves. He's got tremendous ability.” 

Since being called up, Moncada has added value to what is the arguably the best second base fielding team in the MLB. Although no defensive metric is perfect, between Moncada, Tyler Saladino and Yolmer Sanchez, the White Sox second basemen lead the league with 19 defensive runs saved above average. The Pirates have the next highest amount of runs saved by second basemen with 10, according to Baseball-Reference. 

With the enormous range, though, comes the inexperience. In just 46 games, Moncada has tallied eight errors. 

"It happens to the best of them," Renteria said. "He's one of the young men, along with (Anderson) and even (Jose Abreu), who are looking to improve a particular skill, which is defending."

It serves as a reminder that the likely infield of the future still has a ways to go. 

Geovany Soto details ‘total destruction’ of Puerto Rico after speaking with family

Geovany Soto details ‘total destruction’ of Puerto Rico after speaking with family

Geovany Soto’s family in Puerto Rico is safe after Hurricane Maria slammed into the island, leaving at least 24 people dead and virtually all residents without power.

The White Sox catcher said he spoke to his family Wednesday on the phone and they were in good spirits. Soto’s mom, dad and in-laws are in San Juan, Puerto Rico, while his wife and kids are with him in the U.S.

Soto said it’s “total destruction” on the island right now, and the best thing he can do to assist is sending necessary items.

“It’s really tough,” Soto said. “I talked to my parents and the toughest part is you have the money, you can buy batteries but there’s nothing left. So, the best thing I could probably do is kind of from over here is sending batteries, sending anything that I can think of that’s valuable for them right now.” 

Puerto Rico is still in emergency protocol as rescue efforts continue two days after the storm plowed onto land as a Category 4 hurricane. Just seeing the images was hard for Soto. 

"It was unbelievable," he said "You know it’s coming. It’s an island. It’s not like you can evacuate and go where? We don’t have a road that goes to Florida. It is what it is. We try to do the best that we can do with the preparation that they gave us. After you’ve done everything you just kind of brace yourself and keep good spirits and hope for the best."

Soto usually travels to Puerto Rico after the season, but because of the damage, he has yet to make a decision on when, or if, he'll go. 

The veteran catcher is the only Puerto Rican player on the Sox, but manager Rick Renteria's wife also has family on the island. 

"They're doing fine, thankfully," Renteria said. "I think that we expect to hear a little bit more in the next couple days."