Jackson's slider full of action in 10 K domination


Jackson's slider full of action in 10 K domination

Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010
Updated 11:37 PM

By Brett Ballantini

Merely keeping pace with the first-place Minnesota Twins, as the Chicago White Sox did with an 8-0 win over the Baltimore Orioles, wont do.

However, the combination of pitching, fielding and hitting that the Chisox put on display on Thursday night, well, that bodes well for a team that remains tantalizingly close to the top of the division.

The pitching was taken upon entirely by Edwin Jackson, who tossed preposterously dangerous stuff for eight innings, mowing down 10 Orioles and allowing just three hits.

That was one of the biggest reasons we brought Jackson here, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen said. Every start has been a tremendous effort. The way he pitches, the innings we get from him, is something we really needed after Jake Peavy went down. Hes doing what hes supposed to be doing.

We needed that, left fielder Juan Pierre said. He saved the bullpen and closed the door. He had his stuff going.

Jackson Kd two in the first inning, whiffed five in his first two frames and finished his eight innings with 10 punchoutsthe first time in his career hes thrown back-to-back games of 10 strikeouts or more.

The erstwhile ace deflected praise postgame: I dont really go for strikeouts; its just one of those things. I want to be as durable as possible and go as deep in the game as I can. I just wanted to stay in the rhythm.

The White Sox also again proved resourceful with with the lumber while not resorting to anything more abrasive than a single to plate runs in the first eight innings. The Pale Hose scored six times in the first five frames to put the game away. In the process, five White Sox tapped out two safeties as part of a 14-hit attack.

Guys are off of suicide watch, said a relieved Pierre, laughing. When some guys in here dont get their hits, its like the end of the world to them.

The pairs of hits from Pierre, Paul Konerko, Carlos Quentin, A.J. Pierzynski and Mark Teahen all were trumped by Alex Rios 3-for-4 night, augmented by a stolen base, home run, and three RBIs.

He hit a couple of balls to right field, and then he hit a home run on a good pitch to hit, Guillen said. Im glad he picked it up today; I know how players feel when they struggle, and he wasnt feeling good the last couple of days. He just has to go out there as just another player, and today was as great game for him.

Defensively, Pierre made a sweet catch to end the third, a foul-ground stab into the stands that required the same focus that found him swiping his 50th base an inning later, becoming just the 11th player in White Sox history to steal that many in a season.

Fifty, thats a lot of running, Pierre said, when asked to measure his accomplishment. I still have a lot to do for the team. I dont place much importance on individual achievements.

Apropos of Pierre, hed greeted the group waiting to speak to him at his locker postgame with surprise: I didnt do nothing!

Tony Pena tossed a scoreless ninth to secure the victory.

But the story of the night was the resurgent Jackson. Four starts and a 0.96 ERA later, all the ninnied hand-wringing over acquiring the fireballer a month ago seems rather silly, no?

Jackson fits in very, very well, Guillen said. Its hard when you come from a different team and get put in a pennant race. The expectation is very high, and sometimes you dont know how to handle it. He has handled it well: He came to a city thats desperate to win; hes handled it very well.

I havent felt any extra pressure here, Jackson said in response to his managers speculation. Its been a fresh start. Nobody wants to be the weakest link.

Edwin, here in Chicago, we call our aces anything but weak links. But we appreciate your humility. Speaking of, how did your dominance tonight compare with the no-hitter (on June 25)?

I had eight walks in the no-hitter, Jackson said, smiling a bit sheepishly. I was eight walks from a perfect game.

Man, this guy has a lot to learn about hero worship in Chicago.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs


White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs

Chuck Garfien, Slavko Bekovic and Chris Kamka react to the national media blunders that failed to recognize the White Sox as 2005 World Series champions. 

Later, the guys discuss Jerry Reinsdorf's comments about cheering for the Cubs and break down what it takes to beat the Indians. 

Check out the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast below: 

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”