Kaplan: Sox protected by insurance policy for Peavy

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Kaplan: Sox protected by insurance policy for Peavy

Tuesday, April 19, 2011
Posted: 2:24 p.m.

By David Kaplan
CSNChicago.com

Thank Goodness for Insurance

Baseball sources tell us that while Jake Peavy's contract calls for him to be paid 16 million in 2011 and 17 million in 2012, plus a 4 million dollar buyout of his 2013 option year which was for 22 million, the White Sox are significantly protected by an insurance policy that was originally purchased by the San Diego Padres when Peavy signed his current three-year deal in 2009. While exact figures are not available we hear that approximately 65 of the dollars owed to Peavy are covered by insurance. Depending on the severity of his injury, that savings should allow the White Sox some flexibility if they decide to trade for another pitcher during the season.

Peavys agent Barry Axelrod would not comment on the value of the insurance policy but he did tell us that his client fully cooperated when the Padres went to insure the contract. We had a responsibility to cooperate and do all that was asked by the insurance company and Jakes former club (San Diego) to allow them to insure his deal and we did do that.

Axelrod also told us that it is now much more difficult to insure long term deals on pitchers than it was just a few years ago. Industry wide it is becoming much more difficult to insure a contract for a pitcher beyond three years because of the risk of injury in the job, Axelrod said.

Iowa hoopster Cully Payne transfers to Loyola

Former Schaumburg HS basketball star Cully Payne has decided to transfer from Iowa to Loyola. Payne was named to the All Big 10 Freshmen team in 2009-10 and will have three years of eligibility remaining after sitting out the 2011-12 season per NCAA rules.

Dining Out Dept

Bulls players Taj Gibson and Ronnie Brewer enjoying dinner together at Hugos Frog Bar over the weekend.

White Sox stars John Danks and Peavy taking rookie third baseman Brent Morel to dinner at The Fifty50.

Acting legend Burt Reynolds dining at Harry Carays on Navy Pier.

This from the Cincinnati Enquirer

Reds left-hander Aroldis Chapman, who got the last three games off to get over a tender elbow, worked the ninth inning of Monday night's loss to the Pirates and threw a pitch that registered 106 mph on the scoreboard but was clocked at 103 on another pitch tracker. Read the rest of the story here.

More from The Cincinnati Enquirer

Reds pitcher Mike Leake was charged with misdemeanor theft hours before Monday's game after being accused of removing security tags from six T-shirts at a downtown store and leaving without paying for them, store security and police said. Employees at Macy's called police after they said Leake removed the tags from six American Rag T-shirts, valued at 59.88, and left the store with them. The incident was captured by security cameras, police documents state. Read the rest of the story here.

David Kaplan is the host of Chicago Tribune Live on Comcast SportsNet. Follow him on Twitter @thekapman.

Jose Abreu ready for 2017 after season full of 'different challenges'

Jose Abreu ready for 2017 after season full of 'different challenges'

GLENDALE, Ariz. — A torrid two months at the plate helped Jose Abreu end what he found to be an extremely trying 2016 season with numbers close to his career norms.

But even though he finished with an .820 OPS and 100 RBIs for a third straight season, Abreu admits that 2016 was a season unlike any other he'd faced.

While he didn't disclose any theories for the cause of his lengthy struggles, the White Sox first baseman said Sunday he's pleased to have finished on a positive note and thinks that rebounding from those difficulties will only make him stronger. Abreu — who hit .293/.353/.468 with 25 home runs and 100 RBIs in 695 plate appearances — is also a fan of new White Sox manager Rick Renteria and is equally impressed with the prospects the club acquired this winter.

"Yes, those were different challenges, especially in my mind," Abreu said through an interpreter. "I never in my life experienced some of the kind of struggles like I did last year. But that put me in a better position as a player, as a person too. I'm in a better position now for this season because I learned from the experience."

In spite of his struggles, Abreu was still a league average player through the first four months of the season. But the 2014 All-Star hardly resembled the player who produced a 153 OPS-plus over his first two seasons. His timing was off and Abreu — hitting .269/.325/.413 with 11 homers and 56 RBIs through July 30 — wasn't driving the ball as he typically had in his first two seasons, when he smacked 66 homers.

Abreu was lost at the plate and nobody could figure out why.

But after the arrival of his son, Dariel, who visited him for the first time since he moved to the United States, Abreu took off. He hit .338/.402/.568 the rest of the season with 14 homers and 44 RBIs in 249 trips to the plate.

"Right after last season ended, I had my meeting at my house with my family, just to explain to them how the season was because they know about baseball," Abreu said. "But sometimes they can't register how the process is in a season as long as the major league season is. We talked about it. I explained to them all of the challenges, the problems I had during that season. Once we ended with that meeting, last season was in the past. We moved on and we were trying just to figure out things and how can I do better for this season."

Now in his fourth season in the majors, Abreu has a firm grasp on how the White Sox operate and likes some of the team's modifications. He likes how Renteria thoroughly communicates what he has in mind for the club. Abreu also enjoys being seen as one of the team's leaders and wouldn't mind being a mentor to prized prospect Yoan Moncada.

Now he hopes to carry over his strong finish to the start of the 2017 campaign.

"I'm working on it," Abreu said. "That's one of my goals. Everybody knows that at the beginning of last season, I wasn't performing good. It was kind of a surprise for me, too. But I'm in good shape right now and I believe I will be able to succeed."

White Sox rookie Charlie Tilson out at least 10 days with foot injury

White Sox rookie Charlie Tilson out at least 10 days with foot injury

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- The leading candidate to be the team’s starting center fielder, Charlie Tilson has been temporarily shut down after suffering a stress reaction in his right foot.

The White Sox rookie said Sunday that he noticed the injury gradually building up before he decided to stop his workout on Friday and headed for the training room. An MRI performed Saturday on Tilson -- who is rehabbing from a torn left hamstring that ended his 2016 season early -- revealed the reaction, which isn’t severe as a stress fracture. Given Tilson previously had a stress fracture in his right foot, the White Sox said he'll be sidelined from impact work for 10 days, at which point he’d be re-evaluated.

“It started very minimal, and I tried to work through it a little bit, and by the time I addressed Herm, thankfully I caught it before it was anything that would keep me out for too long,” Tilson said. “It’s a minor thing, and it will give my other leg a chance to get stronger in the meantime, and hopefully we’ll turn this negative into a positive.”

Tilson wouldn’t be surprised if his injury is related to overcompensating for his left leg, which he has worked tirelessly to rehab since he suffered the injury on Aug. 2 and then had season-ending surgery. Manager Rick Renteria described it as an “irritation” in the area where Tilson suffered a stress fracture in 2013. In the interim, the White Sox will test some of their other options in camp, including veteran Peter Bourjos and minor leaguers Adam Engel and Jacob May, among others.

“But we don’t foresee it to be a long-term issue,” Renteria said. “By being able to shut him down now, it’ll be something he’ll be able to recover from. We’ll just readjust his timetable.”

Minor as Tilson and the White Sox say it is, the outfielder admitted he’s down about having to deal with it after the progress he’d made in his rehab.

The White Sox acquired the New Trier High School product from the St. Louis Cardinals last July in exchange for left-hander Zach Duke. Tilson was immediately called up as the White Sox intended to try him out in center field the rest of the season. But he suffered a season-ending injury in his major league debut while tracking down a fly ball and had surgery several days later.

Tilson made enough progress to be a full participant in a hitter’s camp at Camelback Ranch last month. Earlier this week, White Sox general manager Rick Hahn said Tilson was a top candidate to take over as the club’s starting center fielder if he was healthy.

“I guess you could say I’m disappointed,” Tilson said. “But it’s a very minor setback and it’s part of the process. I had a major repair, and these things come up and hopefully we can minimize them as much as we can and hopefully this is the last one. But I’m just going to deal with it and do whatever I can to move forward.”