Chicago White Sox

LIVE: White Sox trailing Athletics 7-4

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LIVE: White Sox trailing Athletics 7-4

Wednesday, April 13, 2011
Posted: 10:22 a.m.
Associated Press

The Chicago White Sox's much-maligned bullpen came up big in one of its busiest games of the season. Left-hander John Danks would like to give that group a break.

Danks will try to help Chicago earn its fourth win in five games Wednesday afternoon when it concludes a three-game home set against the Oakland Athletics.

One night after closer Matt Thornton and Jesse Crain were each charged with a run and Chicago (7-4) wasted Mark Buehrle's eight shutout innings in a 2-1, 10-inning loss, the White Sox's bullpen was outstanding in Tuesday's 6-5, 10-inning victory, holding Oakland to a pair of runs following Edwin Jackson's 4 2-3 innings - the club's shortest outing by a starter this season.

Sergio Santos and Chris Sale, who picked up the win, each threw two scoreless frames and Alexei Ramirez ended the bullpen's night with a two-out, game-ending homer off Bobby Cramer.

Ramirez also staked the White Sox to a 3-1 second-inning lead with a three-run shot.

"The bullpen did a great job. The way Santos and Sale threw was the key," manager Ozzie Guillen said after his team snapped Oakland's three-game winning streak and improved to 4-2 on its season high-tying 10-game homestand.

Before hosting the Los Angeles Angels on Friday, the White Sox will look for a solid outing from Danks (0-1, 4.50 ERA), who did not earn a decision in Friday's 9-7 loss to Tampa Bay. The left-hander, who turns 26 this Friday, left the game with a two-run lead after allowing four runs in six innings, but Thornton surrendered four hits and five unearned runs in the ninth to prevent Danks from earning his first victory of the season.

"Our goal is to get the ball to Matt in the ninth," Danks told the White Sox's official website. "We know he's going to get outs. He's the same guy as he was when he was throwing in the seventh and eighth innings. As clich as it sounds, it's only one game."

Danks is 4-1 with a 2.48 ERA in six starts against the A's.

Seeking to conclude its nine-game trip with a 5-4 record, Oakland (5-6) will give the ball to Brett Anderson (0-1, 1.93), who could use more run support from his teammates.

After throwing six innings of one-run ball in a 5-2 loss to Seattle on April 2, the left-hander retired 14 in a row at one point and gave up two runs in eight innings Friday, but lost 2-1 at Minnesota.

The A's have supported Anderson with one run or none in 15 of his 18 career losses.

"He pitched his butt off," catcher Kurt Suzuki said. "He kept them off balance, hit his spots, changed speeds well. We should have got a win for him."

Anderson, 1-1 with a 4.88 ERA in four starts against the White Sox, was tagged for five runs and a career high-tying 10 hits over 5 1-3 innings in his last start in Chicago, a 6-1 loss July 30.

He will likely get his first look at Adam Dunn, who went 1 for 4 with a walk Tuesday after missing six games following an emergency appendectomy.

White Sox first baseman Paul Konerko, who had his 10-game hitting streak snapped Tuesday, is 3 for 11 with a double against Anderson.

A's first baseman Daric Barton matched a career high with four hits Tuesday and is batting .455 (5 for 11) with a pair of doubles off Danks.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

The White Sox made sure Rob Brantly's father celebrated retirement from Air Force in style

The White Sox made sure Rob Brantly's father celebrated retirement from Air Force in style

The surprise that Master Sergeant Robert Brantly received on his final day of work is one he’ll never forget.

The father of White Sox catcher Rob Brantly, the elder Brantly was honored on the field on Monday night as the team’s Hero of the Game and joined by his son, who presented him with an autographed bat. The 37-year Air Force veteran, who also celebrated his 56th birthday, wasn’t informed he would be recognized by the White Sox on the field with his son until late Sunday.

“When I saw my son there and gave him a big hug and he told me I was his hero, it meant the world,” the elder Brantly said. “I can’t express it any other way than just gratitude for this organization, this team and my family putting up with me being away for so many different occasions with the military.

“I will never forget coming here to Chicago.”

The White Sox backstop said he informed the club that his father, an Angels fan, would be in town on his final day of employment in the Air Force. Brantly’s first day as a civilian is Tuesday.

“It’s a pretty emotional moment for me just knowing that my dad in the service he put into this country for almost 40 years fighting for our freedom, but also fighting to give me, his son, every opportunity in the world to succeed and he gave me this opportunity to be here and to be able to play Major League Baseball not only as a service man but as a father teaching me everything to know about baseball and the passion that comes along with the game,” the younger Brantly said.

“He would tell me he puts on that uniform every day so I don’t have to. It carries a lot of weight. To be able to do something like that for him and to finish off his career, his first day of retirement, tipping his cap to a Major League Baseball crowd giving him a standing ovation, it was a special moment for him and our family. I was glad I was able to be there to share that with him.”

Will James Shields stick with 'different' look in 2018?

Will James Shields stick with 'different' look in 2018?

Ever since James Shields dropped down his arm angle, the strikeouts have increased considerably.

The White Sox pitcher struck out eight more batters in Monday night’s 4-2 victory over the Los Angeles Angels. Shields, who pitched seven innings to earn a victory, has averaged nearly a strikeout per inning since he began to throw from a three-quarters angle in the middle of an Aug. 5 loss at Boston. While Shields still hasn’t perfected the new look -- he’s not even sure he’ll bring it back in 2018 -- it has caught the attention of opposing hitters.

“That was definitely a different Shields,” Angels outfielder Mike Trout said. “He was moving the ball around tonight.”  

Shields might consider sticking with the lowered angle. The veteran often insists the adjustment is a work in a progress, though his results have continued to improve (he’s got a 3.51 ERA in his past four starts).

Overall, since Shields made the switch he has a 4.33 ERA in 60 1/3 innings, nearly two points below the 6.19 ERA he produced in his first 56 2/3 frames. Shields has also seen a reduction in home runs allowed per nine innings from 2.38 to 1.79.

But the most drastic change has been in strikeouts. Shields has increased his strikeout-rate to 23.5 percent, up from 16.6 percent. He’s whiffed 59 batters since making the adjustment after only 44 prior.

“He already curls, he closes off,” manager Rick Renteria said. “He's got a cross-angle delivery, so you see his back a lot. But I think the variance in velocities, the breaking ball, he'll run the fastball, sink it. He's doing a lot with it, there's a lot of action going on so it's going to both sides of the plate. But the variance of velocity, especially with the breaking ball, sometimes it pops up there as an eephus or something. He's doing a real nice job.”

Shields has one season left on his current deal and seems likely to return to anchor a young White Sox rotation in 2018. Whether or not he’ll stay with the current setup remains to be seen.

“We’ll see,” Shields said “I’ll make some assessments in the offseason, and see how that works out, see how my body is feeling. Over the last month and a half, it seems to be working out. we’ll see how it goes.

“I’m revamping every year man. This being my 12th season, you’re always trying to refine your game every year, no matter what, whether it’s a pitch or mechanical adjustment. The league makes adjustments on you. I’ve faced a lot of these hitters so many times. I think Robbie Cano I’ve had almost 100 at-bats in my career against. But at the end of the day, you always have to make adjustments.”