MLB Power Rankings: Week 2

734992.png

MLB Power Rankings: Week 2

Every Monday throughout the regular season, we'll be ranking all 30 MLB teams -- take a look and offer up your thoughts in the comments or to us on twitter @CubsTalkCSN or @WhiteSoxTalkCSN.

Previous rankings: Preseason Week 1

Tony
JJ Comments 1

Tony: Hot start overtakes Detroit for No. 1.
JJ: Despite rough start, Rangers are never gonna give Yu up.
2

Tony: Champs look great early.
JJ: Fast start Pujols struggling sounds perfect for Cards fans.
3

Tony: Rough weekend on South Side.
JJ: Delmon Young looks like a corncob in left, you guys.
4

Tony: MLB's best record, Kemp is in beast mode.
JJ: Minnesota the perfect cure for a blah start.
5

Tony: Nothin' doin just yet.
JJ: Bad early record not indicative of their talent.
6

Tony: Success depends on starters.
JJ: Chris Young's on pace for 60 homers. Sustainable!
7

Tony: Four straight losses drops them.
JJ: Runs allowed (57) concerning; still thing pitching is good.
8

Tony: Very solid team playing well.
JJ: gets indigestion thinking about StrasBurger
9

Tony: Need to get things meshed in Hollywood.
JJ: 8 runs Sunday bigger news than Flyers' 8 goals.
10

Tony: Baseball is back north of the border.
JJ: Greinke's like my first car: terrible on the road.
11

Tony: Team is really starting to look good.
JJ: MLB's best record, but haven't been tested. Kemp is a god.
12

Tony: Needs to right the ship.
JJ: 12 run differential is third-best in AL.
13

Tony: Been playing better after slow start.
JJ: Have rebounded nicely after putrid start.
14

Tony: Slow beginning to '12.
JJ: CainBumgarner locked up, not Lincecum. Interesting.
15

Tony: Looked great against Detroit.
JJ: Maybe some beer would loosen up the clubhouse.
16

Tony: Nothin' special right now.
JJ: Could gain some ground wBAL, SEA & OAK on tap.
17

Tony: Ellsbury injury a killer.
JJ: This may be harsh, but haven't done much yet.
18

Tony: Rotation is a bit scary.
JJ: The home run thing is awesome. LoMo's error? Not so much.
19

Tony: Team will struggle to stay at .500.
JJ: 52 runs third-highest output in baseball.
20

Tony: Overall good weekend against Philly.
JJ: Like the Angels, early play not indicative of talent level.
21

Tony: I'm just not sold on this team.
JJ: Giving up a ton of runs like the pre-2007 Rockies.
22

Tony: Neil Walker has had abysmal start.
JJ: Gets early-season over .500 bump.
23

Tony: Some positive signs despite bad record.
JJ: Also gets early-season over .500 bump.
24

Tony: Still need more pitching.
JJ: Averaging 2 runsgame through first 9.
25

Tony: Surprising start.
JJ: Pitching is still a ways off.
26

Tony: MLB-worst record.
JJ: Patience will be a virtue with Jackson, Rizzo.
27

Tony: Who woulda thought they'd be in first ever?
JJ: This is actually a brilliant strategy. 28

Tony: Just can't seem to beat Seattle.
JJ: Good to see someone other than Willingham hit.
29

Tony: Gonna be a rough year for Mauer and Co.
JJ: At least there's Dick Enberg.
30
Tony: Four wins already? That's gotta be a mirage.
JJ: Jordan Schafer looks good, but still Houston until further notice.

Jacob May gets 'Harambe' off his back with first career hit

Jacob May gets 'Harambe' off his back with first career hit

Jacob May earned his first career hit on Saturday night when he singled up in the middle against Cleveland Indians right-hander Carlos Carrasco, ending an 0-for-26 start to his major league career. That lengthy stretch without a hit put a weight on May's back heavier than a monkey, as the cliché usually goes.

Instead, that weight felt like America's favorite deceased silverback gorilla. 

"It was kind of like having Harambe on my back," May, a Cincinnati native, said. "I was in a chokehold because I couldn't breathe as well. Now that he's gone, hopefully I can have a lot of success and help this team win.

In all seriousness, May felt an extraordinary relief when he reached first base. He said first base coach Daryl Boston looked at him and said, "Finally," when he reached first base, and when he got back to the dugout, he was mobbed by his teammates and hugged by manager Rick Renteria.

Before anyone could congratulate him in the dugout, though, May let out a cathartic scream into his helmet.

"I was just like oh, man, I let loose a little bit," May said. "This locker room, every'one has kind of helped me out and brought me aside, and told me to just relax. It's a tough situation when you are trying to impress instead of going out there and having fun. Just kind of got to release all that tension built up."

May only had the opportunity to hit because left fielder Melky Cabrera injured his left wrist in the top of the seventh inning (X-Rays came back negative and Cabrera said he should be able to play Sunday). May didn't have much time to think about having to pinch hit for Cabrera, who was due to lead off the bottom of the seventh, which Renteria figured worked in his favor.

"When we hit for Melky, I was talking to (bench coach Joe McEwing), I said, 'He's not going to have anytime to think about it. He's going to get into the box and keep it probably as simple as possible,'" Renteria said. "I don't think he even had enough time to put his guard on his shin. He just got a pitch out over the middle of the plate and stayed within himself and just drove it up the middle, which was nice to see. Obviously very excited for him."

When May reached first base, he received a standing ovation from the crowd at Guaranteed Rate Field, too, even with the White Sox well on their way to a 7-0 loss to the Indians. It's a moment May certainly won't forget anytime soon, especially now that he got Harambe off his back.

"I kind of soaked it all in," May said. "It was probably one of the most surreal, best experiences of my life."

White Sox scoreless streak hits 23 innings in loss to Indians

White Sox scoreless streak hits 23 innings in loss to Indians

The White Sox haven't scored in their last 23 innings and only have had one runner reach second base in their last 20 frames, a stretch of offensive futility manager Rick Renteria said can be used as a learning experience. 

The White Sox managed just four baserunners and were shut out, 7-0, by a dominant Carlos Carrasco and the Cleveland Indians Saturday evening in front of 32,044 at Guaranteed Rate Field. While the White Sox have run into some top pitching over their last three games — Masahiro Tanaka, Corey Kluber and Carrasco, the latter of whom fired eight shutout innings Saturday — Renteria admitted some of his hitters have been pressing lately, too. 

"For me, it’s about our learning curve now and understanding that (those pitchers) are really executing and doing what they want to do," Renteria said. "And we want to make sure that we give ourselves a chance by staying and trusting with the approaches that we take into the at-bats and try not to focus too much on the results and stay focused on the approaches and we know that the results will take care of themselves. But I know the guys are wanting to get the big hit or wanting to drive the ball out of the ballpark as opposed to just staying very simple. I think it’s a great learning lesson for all of us as a club."

The lone offensive bright spot came in the seventh inning, when Jacob May — pinch-hitting for Melky Cabrera, who jammed his wrist chasing a foul ball but had X-Rays come back negative — connected for a leadoff single, the first hit of his career. The 25-year-old began his career hitless in his first 26 at-bats, and upon returning to the dugout let out a cathartic yell into his helmet and was mobbed by his teammates. After the game, he said it felt like he got "Harambe" off his back. 

Mike Pelfrey, replacing the injured James Shields, allowed four runs (two earned) on four hits with one walk and one strikeout in 4 1/3 innings. The White Sox didn’t want to bring up one of their prize pitching prospects in Triple-A for only two or three starts, so it was the 33-year-old Pelfrey who got the start.

Edwin Encarnacion blasted a two-run home run on a two-out, 0-2 pitch in the first inning, and was tagged for two unearned runs in the fifth on a Carlos Santana double and Francisco Lindor sacrifice fly.

Cleveland tacked on more runs on Michael Brantley’s two-run home run in the seventh and Jose Ramirez’s solo home run in the eighth off Michael Ynoa, who replaced Zach Putnam after the right-hander left the game due to tenderness in his right elbow. The White Sox announced Putnam is day-to-day due to the issue, though Renteria said the issue was more with Putnam's tricep, not his elbow. 

Tyler Saladino singled twice and Jose Abreu drew a walk to account for the other baserunners the White Sox managed against Carrasco.