Ozzie gets the boot; Sox stymied by Colon


Ozzie gets the boot; Sox stymied by Colon

Wednesday, April 27, 2011
Posted: 8:27 p.m. Updated: 9:49 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini

NEW YORKChicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, never one to pass up an opportunity for a joke, mocked his former starter before Wednesdays game, turning a question about a pitchers duel into a crack on the portly hurler.

Bartolo Colon showed up today? Guillen asked. You guys are very lucky. I thought Bartolo never showed up to the ballpark.

Guillen was referring to Colons misbegotten 2009 season on the South Side, when Colon was out of shape and injured, eventually disappearing from the clubhouse completely and leaving no forwarding address.

Well, Colon had the last laugh in an eight-inning effort that sparked a 3-1 win for his New York Yankees. The righthander fired fastball after fastball in the mid 90s-plus, holding the White Sox to seven scattered hits, striking out six and walking one.

Thats the best Ive seen him throw, velocity-wise, movement, White Sox starter Mark Buehrle said. Hes always had that movement, but velocity-wise, seeing some sinkers hes throwing that were pretty much unhittable pitcheswe are obviously going out there battling, but thats the best Ive seen him throw. Of the last couple of years he was in the big leagues and so far this year, thats the best hes thrown.

Colon was amazing, Guillen raved. Colon was, wow. I thought Don Cooper was a pretty good pitching coach. I dont remember seeing Colon throwing that good since Cleveland or when he was pitching in Anaheim. I had a very good opportunity to watch the game on TV and it was amazing how that ball had a lot of movement. Buehrle pitched very good, but Colon pitched better. I tip my hat to him. I feel proud of him.

Guillen, as he acknowledged, wasnt around to appreciate Colons masterpiecefrom the dugout, at least. In the first inning, with Carlos Quentin on second after his team-record 13th double of April, Paul Konerko was punched out on strikes to conclude a controversial sequenceand one that would end Guillens night early.

At 1-2, Colon threw a ball to Konerko that had the Yankees up in arms. Guillen advised home plate umpire Todd Tichenor not to be intimidated by the home howlers.

When the next pitch, a fastball a shade south of the knees, erased the Captain, both player and manager got hot.

Tichenor didnt hear what I said when I was shouting from the dugout, Guillen explained. He was upset and I was upset and everything blow up. Thats it. I said something in the dugout, and then as soon as I went out on the field, he ejected me When he approached me and I said what I had to say, he ejected me. He was right to eject me, but he didnt hear what I was saying.

According to those in the White Sox dugout, Tichenor told Guillen not to step onto the field, and when Guillen didclearly wanting to speak his piece privately to the umpirehe was ejected.

I was kind of laughing, because I was doing some warmup pitches and Tichenor gets down to see warmup pitches and Guillens right there, Buehrle smiled. I didnt know if I wanted to throw another pitch or not. I dont really know what happened. The next thing I knew, Guillen was thrown out and was going at him, but thats part of the game.

Crew Chief Gerry Davis, manning first base and eventually intervening in the very heated argument at home plate, told a pool reporter that Guillen was ejected for profanity directed at an umpire while arguing balls and strikes. Interestingly, Davis contradicted Guillens claims of being ignored, saying that Tichenor told him that hed heard what Guillen said from the dugout.

Guillens only impatience of the postgame came when asked about his tweets, as the manager sent two messages from the clubhouse after his ejection. The first, some 13 minutes into the game, read, This one going to cost me a lot money this is patetic. Guillens follow-up came six minutes later, in apparent reference to Tichenor: Today a tough guy show up a yankee stadium.

When asked about his tweets postgame, Guillen snapped, either angry at himself for causing a sideshowall of baseball was re-tweeting Guillens rageor reprimanded internally for stirring the pot post-ejection.

Im not worried about that, Guillen spat. Lets talk about f------ baseball. F--- tweeting.

There was a game still ongoing, although it was over early, as a three-run bomb from Robinson Cano off of Buehrle in the first was the only support Colon would need for the win. The lefthander, who has scuffled more than any other White Sox starter out of the box, acquitted himself well with seven innings, six hits, three earned runs, and five strikeouts against two walks.

Quentin provided the only offense for Chicago, going 3-3, scoring the clubs only run, and reaching base all four times at-bat. The rest of his White Sox teammates reached base just five times total.

The anemic offensive effortjust one in a line of flat results against not just opposing aces but the supposed hittables of the league, like Brad Penny and Colon himselfwas nothing new. Chicago has now failed to plate more than three runs in 11 of its last 14 games.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”

White Sox name Chris Getz Director of Player Development

White Sox name Chris Getz Director of Player Development

The White Sox announced on Friday they have named former MLB infielder Chris Getz as Director of Player Development.

Getz replaces Nick Capra, who after five seasons in his position was named the White Sox third base coach on Oct. 14.

The 33-year-old Getz has spent the last two years with the Kansas City Royals as a baseball operations assistant/player development in which he assisted in minor-league operations and player personnel decisions.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

“I'm excited about the opportunity to help teach and develop young talent in the organization where my professional career began,” Getz said in a press release. “I was drafted twice, worked through the minor leagues, and reached the major leagues with the White Sox. Through this journey, I was able to gain an understanding of the individuals within this organization, who I respect greatly.  The director of player development is an important role, and the health of the minor-league system is vital for major-league success.  I look forward to putting my all into making the White Sox a strong and winning organization.”
White Sox Senior VP/general manager Rick Hahn added: “We are pleased to add Chris’ intellect, background and energy to our front office. He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago.”

Getz, originally a fourth-round selection by the White Sox in the 2005 MLB Draft out of Michigan, played in seven MLB seasons with the White Sox (2008-09), Royals (2010-13) and Blue Jays (2014).

Getz had a career slash line of .250/.309/.307 with three home runs, 111 RBI and 89 stolen bases.