Peavy feels he hasn't proven anything yet

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Peavy feels he hasn't proven anything yet

Jake Peavy had the best April of any American League pitcher -- at least, that what the award says. It was a nice token for someone who's struggled with injuries and ineffectiveness ever since coming to the junior circuit. But the 30-year-old right-hander isn't reading too much into the honor.

"It's certainly exciting to be back healthy and doing what I had done before getting here. That's something I feel blessed to be able to do," Peavy said Wednesday. "But at the same time, one month doesn't prove anything. It shows, hopefully, I'm healthy and can put together a few more like this one and call it a good year."

Indications are that Peavy is on the right track based off his April numbers. While Peavy said he doesn't think he's doing much differently from his San Diego days, how he's gone about his success has changed. His strikeouts are down, but so are his walks.

Through the adversity of the last few seasons, Peavy has developed and matured as a pitcher. And that he's healthy right now doesn't hurt, either.

"If you watch other guys pitch who have been in the league kind of the same time I have and have the mileage, everybody slows down a bit," Peavy explained. "When you go through the times I went through, you learn a little bit about pitching and mixing and matching and experience, experience goes a long way. I've had some tough years these past few years, so to be healthy and to go out there and worry about nothing but to execute the game plan you come up with is awfully nice."

There will be adversity ahead for Peavy -- if he keeps allowing a high rate of fly balls, eventually he'll get burned -- but he's really not looking at the big picture. Instead, all he's thinking about is a way to beat Detroit in his next start.

"You certainly are not going to end the season with a sub-2.00 ERA, you don't really anything like that'll happen," Peavy said. "But you gotta put everything in perspective. I'm going to do everything I can go to be prepared to pitch Friday night, and I can promise you my biggest expectation is to win that game."

White Sox: Avisail Garcia leaves game early with sore left knee

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AP

White Sox: Avisail Garcia leaves game early with sore left knee

White Sox outfielder Avisail Garcia left Wednesday night’s game with a sore left knee.

Garcia exited the contest in the top of the ninth inning when he was replaced in right field by Alen Hanson. The removal came two innings after a pickoff throw at first base forced Garcia to awkwardly dive back to the bag.

In the middle of a heavy rain, Garcia stayed on the ground for several seconds after New York Yankees catcher Gary Sanchez attempted to throw behind him.

The team’s best All-Star candidate, Garcia entered the contest hitting .321/.361/.516 with 11 home runs and 51 RBIs in 305 plate appearances. Garcia was 0-for-2 with a walk and was hit by a pitch before he left early.

How Rick Renteria has tried to help White Sox players combat travel fatigue

How Rick Renteria has tried to help White Sox players combat travel fatigue

They’re finally at home and Rick Renteria has implored White Sox players to relax a little.

Take a nap. Go see a movie. Run some errands.

Basically, the White Sox manager has ordered his players to do anything but arrive early to Guaranteed Rate Field the past two games. For the third time already on the 10-game homestand, White Sox players were instructed to check into the clubhouse later than normal. Renteria is attempting to help his players catch up after a trying schedule that began with 44 road dates in the team’s first 71 games.

Though it won’t be a routine practice, Renteria is aware his players have to be feeling some of the effects of a schedule that has had them mostly away from Chicago before this week and wanted to correct it.

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“We have been traveling a lot,” Renteria said. “The reality is the body's fatigued, you're getting up early, you're packing every three days. I just thought (Tuesday) would be an appropriate time to give them a little breath. And then after the victory last night, going in they were talking a little bit about maybe doing it again today. Honestly, they're the ones that are playing the game. It's not something I'll probably do every single day, that would be impossible. We still have to get our work in. But I thought it kind of fit the moment and we allowed them to do it again (Wednesday).”

Though he’s unaccustomed to the practice, Todd Frazier doesn’t mind it. White Sox players have been allowed to arrive at the park on consecutive days at 5 p.m. for the 7:10 p.m. starts.

Even so, many players were already in the building by the time media access to the clubhouse began at 4:30 p.m. Frazier said players simply have to be a little more efficient in preparing for the game.

“It’s good,” Frazier said. “You get to spend more time with the family. If you can get a nap in there, that helps too. Getting to the ballpark, you feel like you have more time than you really have, but you work in the cage, get warmed up and away you go. It’s like high school. You get to the field an hour before the game, get a quick stretch, talked to the guys about what did you do last night, how’s what’s her name doing, hang around and then we go to work.”