Peavy injury clouds White Sox win

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Peavy injury clouds White Sox win

Wednesday, July 7, 2010
Updated: 1:11 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

CHICAGO It was a recipe for smiles all around: A second straight win over a hot, potent, pesky foe in the Los Angeles Angels, 16 wins in 20 games, edging to their best record since last making the playoffs two seasons ago.

But the Chicago White Soxs 4-1 win was shadowed by the loss of Jake Peavy, who pitched a commanding inning-plus before yielding to what first appeared to be a shoulder injury. The later, mildly-encouraging diagnosis, was a strained right latissimus dorsi muscle, which is in the back but centers discomfort in the armpit. (Peavy will be reevaluated tomorrow, with Daniel Hudson waiting in the wings for a sub start on Sunday if needed.)

I assumed he was done when I saw him walk off the mound, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen said of the ace that injects the Chuck Norris into starting pitching. Im pretty sure right now hell be on the DL.

Peavy himself wasnt speculating, but his postgame expression spoke volumes, if the beachball ice wrap sitting like a cyst on the right side of his torso didnt.

I dont know what to say. It didnt feel good, Peavy said. Something wasnt right.

The bucking bronc of a hurler cruised through the first, notching two strikeouts and looking as dominant as ever. His push toward an eighth win on the campaign was bolstered in the bottom half, when Juan Pierre led off with a rainbow double that eluded a somewhat sluggish Torii Hunter in right-center. One third-sack swipe by Savoir Pierre and an Alex Rios sac fly to left later, the White Sox led 1-0.

In the second, Hunter led off with a dribbler to third that rookie Dayan Viciedo misplayed into a single and Hideki Matsui flew out to right. Peavy coaxed his last out of the game not from batter Mike Napoli but Hunter, ambushed with a pickoff attempt that turned into out No. 2.

It was Peavys 28th pitch that found him walking immediately off the mound in pain. The workhorse was replaced by Tony Pena as a hush fell over the 21,889 in the U.S. Cellular Field crowd and Guillen tossed a towel in frustration.

Pena filled in well, however, pitching 4.1 innings of five-hit ball, stretching out for 53 pitches in a crucial, bullpen-saving effort.

Pena did a great job, Guillen said. He was the key to the game.

The Angels did knot the score at one when Napoli struck an 0-2 single up the middle to score Hunter in the bottom of the fourth. The White Sox threatened in the bottom half, when Mark Kotsay hit a long fly to left that Juan Rivera misplayed into a double and A.J. Pierzynski walked, but Andruw Jones, apparently content to free-fall back to the bench, whiffed with a pair still poised.

As Pena continued to cruise, Rios rescued the win for him with a long homer to left-center in an at-bat that immediately followed feisty Angels starter Jered Weaver dusting him in the batters box.

This game is crazy, Rios said of snapping his 0-13 slump on an evening he wasnt originally scheduled to play. As for exacting revenge on Weaver (who in his career had never allowed a home run, and just two runs total, vs. Chicago and fell to 4-1 with a 1.34 ERA with the loss), Rios merely fastened on a broad smile and said of his clout, It was good.

One inning later, Jones belted his 399th career home run to almost the identical spot in the stands as Rios. It was Jones first dinger in more than a month, snapped a 0-17 streak for the veteranand allowed him to make a pitch for another start on Wednesday.

Prior to the clout, his manager had been nearly reduced to begging Jones to relocate his lost stroke. Please hit another one before the next 200 at-bats, Guillen jabbed Jones postgame.

Hes kind of wild right now, Guillen continued. But we really needed that homer.

The Chisox continued stringing hits in the seventh to push across another run, with Viciedo stroking a single to center, Brent Lillibridge poking a blast to left-center that saw the Power-Packed Energy Wad pumping his fist out of the batters box in premature home run euphoria and Pierre tapping a grounder that Napoli could not corral, scoring a sprawling Viciedo.

To finish off this bittersweet victory, Guillen turned to his customary combination of J.J. Putz (a perfect, two-K seventh), Matt Thornton (escaping the eighth despite putting two men on with just one out before inducing popouts from No. 3 hitter Bobby Abreu and cleanup clouter Hunter) and Bobby Jenks (sweating a bit en route to his 18th save).
Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

Veteran outfielder Peter Bourjos eyes role with White Sox

Veteran outfielder Peter Bourjos eyes role with White Sox

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- As he surveyed the landscape this offseason, Peter Bourjos thought he and the White Sox would make for a good fit.

Adam Eaton had been traded and Austin Jackson departed via free agency, leaving the White Sox with Melky Cabrera and several young players to man a thin outfield. Bourjos, who lived in Chicago until second grade, pursued the White Sox and last month agreed to terms on a minor-league deal in hopes of earning a spot on the Opening Day roster. Last season, Bourjos, who was born in Chicago, hit .251/.292/.389 with five home runs and 23 RBIs in 383 plate appearances for the Philadelphia Phillies.

“I always liked playing in Chicago,” Bourjos said. “It was a good fit and then spring training is here. I have two young kids. So packing them up and going to Florida wasn’t something I wanted to do either.

“We definitely look at all those options on paper. Evaluate what might be the best chance of making a team and this is definitely one of them. It seems like a good fit on paper.”

If he’s healthy enough, Charlie Tilson will get the first crack at the everyday job in center field. Tilson, who missed the final two months of last season with a torn hamstring, is currently sidelined for 10 days with foot problems. Beyond Tilson, the White Sox have prospects Adam Engel and Jacob May with Cabrera slated to start in left field and Avisail Garcia pegged for right. Leury Garcia is also in the mix.

But there still appears to be a good shot for Bourjos to make the club and manager Rick Renteria likes his veteran presence for the young group. Bourjos has accrued six seasons of service time between the Phillies, Los Angeles Angels and St. Louis Cardinals.

“Bourjy has been around,” Renteria said. “He knows what it takes. He understands the little nuances of major-league camp and how we have so many players and we want to give them all a look. We want to see Bourjos, we want to see him out there.”

Bourjos, who turns 30 in March, has an idea what he wants to do with his chance. A slick defensive outfielder, Bourjos wants to prove he’s a better hitter than his .243/.300/.382 slash line would suggest. He said it’s all about being relaxed.

“Offensively just slow everything down and not try to do too much,” Bourjos said. “I put a lot of pressure on myself and it hasn’t translated. I think last year I got in a spot where I just tried to relax in the batter’s box and let everything go and what happened happened. I had success with that.

“I now realize what that feels like and it doesn’t work. Just take a deep breath and be relaxed in the box and good things are going to happen.”

Gio, Geo and Gio: White Sox spring training has its own version of 'Who's on First?'

Gio, Geo and Gio: White Sox spring training has its own version of 'Who's on First?'

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Giovanni Soto pitched to Geovany Soto at White Sox camp on Monday morning, and the Internet loved it.

The veteran catcher and rookie pitcher, who share similar names and have been friends for two years, worked together during live batting practice. The unrelated pair, who both hail from Puerto Rico, said they’ve been confused for each other several times since reporting to camp last week. Each has also heard the other’s name being called out and thought it was for them, which has led to more confusion. But those mix-ups haven’t limited their enjoyment of the situation, either.

“It’s kind of surreal that he has the same name, last name,” Geovany Soto said. “It’s kind of weird calling him Gio and he’s calling me Geo. It’s kind of weird.

“With the physicals, doctors, the people for the drug testing, we’ve been confused in all three of those. I’m expecting that to happen. Hopefully I can get a big check on his name and cash it.”

The social media world isn’t alone in its enjoyment of the topic as both players smiled while discussing it on Monday.

Giovanni Soto said the players met two seasons ago when he pitched for the Cleveland Indians and the catcher was in his first stint with the White Sox. They grew up about 20 minutes apart from each other in Puerto Rico and now spend time together in the offseason. But what has made the scenario even more confusing is that White Sox prospect Lucas Giolito is seated only a few stalls away from Giovanni Soto in the clubhouse.

“It’s kind of weird, especially in the clubhouse and on the field because when someone says Geo, we turn around to see if it’s for him or for me,” Giovanni Soto said. “And we also have Giolito, and people call him Gio. It’s weird, but it’s funny too.”

Both Sotos could make the team’s Opening Day roster.

Geovany Soto, who signed a minor league contract in January, is the most experienced catcher in camp and is favored to win a job. Giovanni Soto, who was claimed off waivers from the Cubs in November, is one of several relievers competing for a spot and could make the club if the White Sox decide to carry two left-handers in the bullpen. And while Giolito is expected to start the season at Triple-A, he could reach the majors at some point causing more pandemonium.

“There’s a lot of Geo going on with Giolito, Giovanni and then me,” Geovany Soto said. “And can get pretty hectic. But yeah, it’s fun for us.”