Peavy's long road back to the top

750158.png

Peavy's long road back to the top

KANSAS CITY -- Jake Peavy described the week that led up to Tuesdays All-Star Game as a wild ride.

But the White Sox starting pitcher, who on Thursday lost the Final Vote contest to Texas Rangers pitcher Yu Darvish and was a last-minute addition Sunday to the American League roster, might as well have referenced the five years in between All-Star appearances.

Since he last played in All-Star Game in San Francisco in 2007 for the San Diego Padres, Peavy has won a unanimous Cy Young award, received a contract extension for a guaranteed 56 million, been traded to the White Sox twice, including once while he was injured, and later dealt with a career-threatening shoulder injury and the long road to recovery. Not an easy load for a guy who has no problem with admitting hes an emotional guy on all fronts.

Were here and I couldnt be more excited after what weve been through, Peavy said. I cant tell you last year when I was a year out of that major surgery and trying to make it back and going out there with the stuff I had, feeling the way I had, I never would have imagined a year later Id be talking to you from the All-Star Game.

Granted, this isnt the same Jake Peavy from five years earlier.

When he received all 32 first-place Cy Young votes in 2007, Peavy was purely a stuff guy. His fastball, which averaged 92.5 mph but routinely reached 95, and his slider, accounted for more than 80 percent of his pitches.

The Peavy who is now two years removed from a detached latissimus dorsi muscle injury in his right shoulder turns to his curveball and changeup far more often. His fastball averages 90.5 mph.

Teammate Adam Dunn prefers the current version.

Hes a smarter pitcher (now), Dunn said. He had great stuff back then. Im not saying he doesnt have it now. But he never threw changeups. He never threw curveballs. Now, obviously he doesnt have 95 anymore. Hes got his 92, which is really, plenty now. Hes got a really good changeup now that hes worked on, because he had to. And his slider is still sharp and now hes throwing the curveball as well. Hes evolved into a pitcher instead of more of a thrower.

One aspect of Peavys game, which hasnt changed, nor will it, is his emotional state on the mound. Peavy has long been known for his competitive fire. Its what many consider to have helped him overcome the fact that hes not as tall and is much skinnier than many of the pitchers he competes against.

A Peavy start is normally accompanied by several scenes of the pitcher cursing himself as he yanks a slider or doesnt properly locate a fastball.

It is a show, teammate Chris Sale said. Thats him being a competitor and trying to pretty much perfect pitching. He goes out every time and tries to be his best and when hes not, hes not happy. Its fun to watch. You pick up things. It works for him and it works very well.

Peavys fiery side allowed him to return from what St. Louis Cardinals outfielder Matt Holliday describes as uncharted territory. Peavys shoulder surgery, to repair a muscle that had completely fallen off the bone, was the first of its kind.

Though doctors expected him to be as healthy as he would be after 18 months, Peavy wasnt certain hed ever be capable of pitching at the level that allowed him to go 92-68 with the Padres. The only thing Peavy was certain about was he would do everything he could to give himself a chance to again become one of the games top pitchers.

Holliday, who faced him in St. Louis last month, said Peavy has regained his status as an elite-level pitcher. It isnt unexpected, either, Holliday said.

For him to be back to where he is now is impressive, but not surprising, Holliday said. Ive known Jake a little bit. Im not really surprised. Hes always been an elite pitcher and hes had a couple of years with injuries, but hes back to where I expect him to be. He was nearly unhittable (then). But hes still a very good pitcher. Hes as competitive as ever and as anybody in the game. He knows how to pitch and he probably knows how to pitch a little better now than he did then.

As for the flair and competitive drive on the mound, Peavy never lost it and Dunn is certain he never will.

Someone like him, it doesnt matter, Dunn said. In 15 or 20 or 30 years from now, well be on the golf course and itll be the same thing. You dont lose that.

Peavy hasnt lost his ability to comprehend where he is, either

He was excited his stall was several feet from Dunn. After the struggles both shared in 2011, Peavy knows he and Dunn will enjoy the All-Star experience as much as any rookie or first-time competitor in the clubhouse.

After what we went through together last year its super gratifying, Peavy said. It means the world. You never take this for the granted.

Jose Quintana gets the Opening Day start for White Sox

Jose Quintana gets the Opening Day start for White Sox

 

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Jose Quintana has been named the Opening Day starter — for the White Sox.

While many are surprised he still hasn't been traded, few should be shocked by the news manager Rick Renteria delivered on Friday, when he announced Quintana would pitch the April 3 opener.

With Chris Sale gone to Boston, Quintana, a first-time All-Star in 2016, has been the odds-on favorite to take over as the team's ace. The only question seemed to be whether or not he'd still be in a White Sox uniform when the season began. But the club made it clear Friday that Quintana is their guy and he'll face the Detroit Tigers in the first game of 2017. The only one who seemed a little taken aback about the news is Quintana.

"I was surprised," Quintana said. "I knew I may get the ball for that day, but they didn't say nothing, so you didn't know. I just kept going and doing my workouts and all my stuff. I'm really, really happy with this opportunity. It's huge for me. I can't wait for that day to come.

"I'm excited to have this opportunity. It's a huge honor for me to have the ball for Opening Day the first time in my life. And I think it's a once-in-a-life opportunity."

Asked about the announcement earlier in the week, Renteria said he needed more time. Many speculated that it meant the White Sox were continuing to listen to offers for Quintana, who has drawn constant interest since the team began its rebuild in December.

[WHITE SOX TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

Quintana, who went 13-12 with a 3.20 ERA and 181 strikeouts in 208 innings last season, has looked fantastic all spring. Pitching in front of more than a dozen scouts on Thursday, Quintana made his first Cactus League appearance in a month and allowed two hits over seven scoreless innings. The left-hander also put on a brilliant performance for Colombia in the World Baseball Classic on March 10 as he retired the first 17 Team USA hitters he faced before allowing a hit.

"He's very happy about it," Renteria said. "He has obviously earned it.

"I don't know if he was surprised as much as he was elated and proud to be given the opportunity to be the Opening Day starter. It's a privilege."

Quintana's resume of consistency made him a clear-cut choice for the nod. He heads into 2017 having pitched at least 200 innings in each of the past four seasons. In that span, he's produced a 3.32 ERA and 18.1 Wins Above Replacement, according to fangraphs.com. That figure represents the seventh-highest WAR total among all big league pitchers in that span.

Even though he's viewed as the staff ace, Quintana — who potentially has four years and $36.85 million left on his current contract — said he was surprised by the news because the club hadn't yet informed him of the honor.

"It means a lot for me, especially after last year when you make the All-Star team and this year the opportunity to play in the WBC and now you have the opportunity to pitch on Opening Day," Quintana said. "That's a lot of things happening for me now and I'm happy. And really blessed. You just try to do all my things every time.

"Maybe they don't know what it means for me, but it's a big thing."

Carlos Rodon slated for MRI, could start season on disabled list with bicep tightness

Carlos Rodon slated for MRI, could start season on disabled list with bicep tightness

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Carlos Rodon was scratched from a Friday start with tightness in his upper left bicep, and it could land him on the disabled list to start the 2017 season.

General manager Rick Hahn said on Friday that the team's initial exam of their third-year starter was "positive." But the White Sox intend to be extremely cautious with Rodon, who is headed to have an MRI instead of starting against the Oakland A's in Mesa. Hahn said Rodon also is likely to have a second opinion early next week.

"We're going to err on the side of caution here, even if it winds up costing him his first couple starts because we're slowing down the schedule now by scratching him," Hahn said. "It's too early to speculate how long we're going to be without Carlos. I hate to speculate, but since we are slowing down his schedule by having him miss the start today, the odds are probably that he starts the season on the DL. But again we'll know more after he takes his further exams."

Rodon informed the White Sox he felt some tightness in his bicep on Thursday, at which point they examined him. The team's exam suggested Rodon has no structural damage, Hahn said.

[WHITE SOX TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

Free of worry, Rodon requested to make his start against Oakland, but the team declined and opted for a second opinion. Zach Putnam will start and pitch one inning instead.

With the intent of helping him reach the 200-inning mark this season, the White Sox took a slower route with Rodon this spring, similar to the way they handled Chris Sale last year.

Rodon went 9-10 with a 4.04 ERA in 28 starts last season, striking out 168 batters in 165 innings.

Rodon has done most of his work this February and March on back fields and in simulated games. He made his first Cactus League appearance against the Los Angeles Angels on Sunday and struck out five in four scoreless innings. He allowed one hit and walked one.

Hahn said the injury could land Rodon on the DL to start the season as the White Sox intend to make sure the left-hander is healthy and prepared to return.