'Phil'ing in: Humber the toast of Sox clubhouse

'Phil'ing in: Humber the toast of Sox clubhouse

Sunday, April 10, 2011Posted: 1:05 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

When Phil Humber woke up on Saturday morning, it was like any other day for the young righthanderaside from the jitters accompanying his third-ever major league start (first with the Chicago White Sox) and an incessantly-buzzing cell phone piling up with well-wishing texts from friends and family.

By the time he went to bed after a 4-2 triumph after some modest and heartfelt celebration, Humbers prospects on the South Side had leaped ahead by bounds.

READ: Humber makes his best pitch, hurls gem over Rays

It's exciting, Humber said. I was going out there trying to get the team a win. It wasn't about me, it was about the Chicago White Sox. I was thankful I was able to go six solid innings and continue from there.

I couldnt have been any happier for Phil in his first start here, catcher A.J. Pierzynski said. His first start with the White Sox, to come out in Chicago and to throw the way he did was awesome. Im so happy for him. Hes a great guy and has great stuff. He always just needed an opportunity, and hes going to get it here for a little while. So, we will see what he can do.

In a strange twist of fate, one of Humbers career starts came against the White Sox, in the first game of last years bizarro night doubleheader at Kansas City. He battled through a rough 5 23 innings in that game, giving up nine hits and five earned runs, but Kd six Chisox and earned the 6-5 win. In his one earlier start, a Sept. 26, 2007 start for the New York Mets vs. the Washington Nationals, Humber escaped without a loss but was scraped a bit, throwing four innings and giving up six hits, five earned runs, and two walks against no strikeouts. For his career heading into yesterdays effort, Humber was 1-0 with a 9.31 ERA and 2.17 WHIP.

I've had plenty of chances, said the former No. 3 overall pick (2004). It's just relaxing and allowing yourself to get out of the way. A lot of times, I put too much pressure on myself.

WATCH: Humber's reaction on the first start of his career for White Sox
So really, theres no real explanation for how the former first-rounder performed so beyond expectations with his gem of a win. In the spring, after all, Humber pitched mostly well enough not to lose, rather than going out and stealing the No. 5 rotation spot with a golden Cactus League.

His biggest thing is in spring training he has been behind in the count and having to pitch in, Pierzynski said. But today he was ahead of the count and he was able to use his curveball, which is one of the better curves Ive seen. He threw some good changeups to get some outs. He moved the ball around with his fastball. He established his fastball enough to make his curve ball effective.

There was only one righthander against me in the lineup, so I threw my changeup quite a bit and used the curveball when I needed to, Humber said. I located the fastball and didn't shake A. J. off but once or twice.

Now, the White Sox are left with the delightful proposition of slowing down Jake Peavys minor league rehabilitation if need beas well as having a sneak ace in the No. 5 hole of the rotation.

If they give me the ball, I'm going to go out there and do the best I can with it, take it one day at a time, Humber said, looking toward next Friday vs. the Los Angeles Angels. If I get another start, then I'll treat it the same way.

Suddenly, rather than being tucked away on a minor league bus, lucky to get a sentence-long mention on a major-league scoreboards Farm Report, Humber finds himself on sports highlights coast-to-coast and is the toast of the White Sox clubhouse. But in case you think Humber was happy with just a six-inning win, think againthe college ace has higher expectations.

You can go a complete game or something like that, he said, laughing over whether his win was as good a game as he could imagine having. It could have been better, pitch a shutout or something like that. But I wasnt thinking about results, other than I want to throw at least six or seven. Having A.J. back there helps you relaxhe knows what hes doing, hes been around a long time, and hes faced the same lineup two games already. It was fun.

If there was anything Humber was thinking of as he gritted his teeth and focused through the best game of his major league career, it was those people who were with him in the tough times, now around to celebrate the good.

Hopefully a lot of people got to see the game, on a weekend and everything, Humber said. Its been kind of a long road to this point, but its made me better as a person and a player. So Im thankful, basically.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

How Rick Renteria has tried to help White Sox players combat travel fatigue

How Rick Renteria has tried to help White Sox players combat travel fatigue

They’re finally at home and Rick Renteria has implored White Sox players to relax a little.

Take a nap. Go see a movie. Run some errands.

Basically, the White Sox manager has ordered his players to do anything but arrive early to Guaranteed Rate Field the past two games. For the third time already on the 10-game homestand, White Sox players were instructed to check into the clubhouse later than normal. Renteria is attempting to help his players catch up after a trying schedule that began with 44 road dates in the team’s first 71 games.

Though it won’t be a routine practice, Renteria is aware his players have to be feeling some of the effects of a schedule that has had them mostly away from Chicago before this week and wanted to correct it.

[VIVID SEATS: Get your White Sox tickets here]

“We have been traveling a lot,” Renteria said. “The reality is the body's fatigued, you're getting up early, you're packing every three days. I just thought (Tuesday) would be an appropriate time to give them a little breath. And then after the victory last night, going in they were talking a little bit about maybe doing it again today. Honestly, they're the ones that are playing the game. It's not something I'll probably do every single day, that would be impossible. We still have to get our work in. But I thought it kind of fit the moment and we allowed them to do it again (Wednesday).”

Though he’s unaccustomed to the practice, Todd Frazier doesn’t mind it. White Sox players have been allowed to arrive at the park on consecutive days at 5 p.m. for the 7:10 p.m. starts.

Even so, many players were already in the building by the time media access to the clubhouse began at 4:30 p.m. Frazier said players simply have to be a little more efficient in preparing for the game.

“It’s good,” Frazier said. “You get to spend more time with the family. If you can get a nap in there, that helps too. Getting to the ballpark, you feel like you have more time than you really have, but you work in the cage, get warmed up and away you go. It’s like high school. You get to the field an hour before the game, get a quick stretch, talked to the guys about what did you do last night, how’s what’s her name doing, hang around and then we go to work.”

White Sox catcher Kevan Smith has a ball after drawing first career walk

White Sox catcher Kevan Smith has a ball after drawing first career walk

Rookie Kevan Smith wanted his first career walk in the worst possible way on Tuesday night.

The White Sox catcher was so intent upon ending a lengthy walk drought to start his career that he determined to lean in against one of the hardest throwers in the league.

Ahead 3-0 in the count with one out in the ninth inning against New York Yankees reliever Dellin Betances, Smith inched closer to the plate. The four-pitch walk Smith drew in career plate appearance No. 130 not only ended the second longest walk-less streak to start a career since 1990, it also jumpstarted a game-winning White Sox rally. Smith was afforded plenty of time to enjoy the moment, too, as manager Rick Renteria immediately pulled him for a pinch runner.

“Oh yeah (I knew),” Smith said. “One hundred percent. I got way on the plate and was like, ‘You’re either going to hit me or walk me’ because I’m not letting this one slide. I’ve been to a few 3-0 counts, but finally got the first one out of the way. Everybody was laughing at me.

“It was a celebratory thing. I got to come off the field on my first one.”

Smith’s moment was worthy of a celebration.

Whereas Tim Anderson’s base on balls-free stretch to start his career got a ton of notoriety in 2016, Smith’s received almost none despite the fact that he soared past Anderson. A highly touted rookie known for his aggressive approach at the plate, people kept close tabs on Anderson’s stretch when he went 85 plate appearances without a walk to start his career. But Smith eclipsed that mark with a strikeout in his lone trip to the plate on June 9. It wasn’t until 44 plate appearances later that Smith could walk the walk.

Since 1990, only Jeff Francouer had gone longer among all major leaguers when he didn’t draw a free pass until his 131 plate appearance in 2005. Smith tied the Yankees’ Oscar Azocar (who walked in his 130th trip in 1990) when he ended the seventh inning with a strikeout against New York starting pitcher Luis Severino.

Other notable White Sox players with lengthy walk-less streaks to start their careers include: Jeff Abbott (84, 1997-98), Dayan Viciedo (83, 2010) and Josh Phegley (83, 2013).

“Dang,” Anderson said with a smile. “Nobody made a big deal about his though.”

[VIVID SEATS: Get your White Sox tickets here]

Similar to Anderson, Smith has always been fairly aggressive at the plate. His career walk-rate in the minor leagues is 8.7 percent (195 in 2,229 plate appearances). But that aggression hasn’t prevented Smith from finding offensive success during his third stint in the majors. After going 5-for-42 to start his career, Smith has heated up, hitting .313/.322/.422 with six doubles, one home run and eight RBIs in his last 87 plate appearances.

“The more at-bats he gets up here it's natural to start getting a little more comfortable,” manager Rick Renteria said. “He's certainly showing that he's able to do a few things at the plate. He's handling at-bats more a little more calmly.”

The calmer demeanor has helped Smith stick to an approach in which he has confidence. In seven minor league seasons, Smith carried a .285/.361/.449 slash line. He believes staying with what works will be the key to whether or not he can continue to perform.

“I think what makes guys successful up here is they stick to their approach,” Smith said. “I always use (Joe) Mauer as an example. He stays so true to his approach and looks for what he wants to hit that it’s almost frustrating as a catcher and a pitcher. But there’s a reason he’s been around for so long and I’m envious of what he does in the box. I’m just going to keep trying to get as comfortable as I can and strive for that approach each game and each at-bat.”