Chicago White Sox

Poetry in Pros: Guillen stays, Williams goes

Poetry in Pros: Guillen stays, Williams goes

Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010
8:46 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

Given the controversies that have hounded Chicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen almost from the beginning of the season, he cant be blamed for wondering whether he will always be welcome at U.S. Cellular Field.

But the feisty skipper currently piloting the second-place club in the American League Central once again made it clear on Thursday that for as much bravado as he packs in his belief that if he ever was fired, he wouldnt be out of work long, he didnt plan to manage elsewhere anytime soon.

I was looking for a house in Chicago this morning. People think Im lying, Guillen said. I have a beautiful house back in Miami and in Caracas Venezuela, but Chicago is the place I live the most.

Guillen is currently signed to manage the White Sox through the 2011 season, and the team holds an option to extend him to 2012. While Guillen doesnt claim hed pout over an extension, clearly hed like to be rewarded for his consistently good work in the managers chair, emphasizing today how happy he was that his team had bounced back from a 9.5 games deficit to reach first place and remain in close contention3.5 gamesin the American League Central.

I like competition. I like to compete, Guillen said. I like people to ask me questions and second-guess me. I like people to hate me. I like that. Why not? Im not a perfect guy. Some people love me, some people hate me. I like that. I like to compete and make those players compete.

Guillens tardy pregame sessionwhich found media members waiting for a good half-hour in the dugout, then herded into his managers office, then back out to the dugout after the managers meeting with GM Ken Williams went overtimequickly took on a bit of a dissertational direction.

Asked how was feeling in a season that seemed especially trying both on and off the field, the Chisox jefe again replied with total honesty.

My energy, its good, Guillen said. It could be worse. Right now, Im fighting through it the dog days, and Im fine. Sometimes you leave this ballpark like, My God, wow, Im bad and tired of it, but then you go to sleep and come back and come back with the same energy.

The day I dont want to come here, I will retire. Ill send you media a note: Thank you for the support, Ill see you guys later. You know when I feel bad? When I walk from the car to the ballpark and you see those guys, the vendorsthey are pulling for us because the only way they make money is when we win.

Youre in this game for two reasonsto put a ring on your finger and get players to play well for you.

While Guillen again reiterated that he didnt need any new players to take the AL Central away from the Minnesota Twins (Im very happy with this ballclub I dont want anybody else), Williams is charged with examining every possible acquisition that could spell the difference between first and second place at seasons end.

To wit, the GM was less giddy than Guillen over the White Sox, saying before Thursdays game that, Theyll give me confidence when they string together some wins.

Williams also expressed a bit of exasperation at the consistent questioning about X or Y player, saying, People dont understand, but everybody goes through waivers, every year. If youre in the major leagues, youre put on waivers.

The GM acknowledged that while an ideal waiver claim would be of the Alex Rios 2009 variety, a player who could help both now and in the long term, such now-and-later players are rare on the wire.

And as for the concern that a certain playerdont just think Manny Ramirezmight be out of Chicagos range money-wise (a Rios concern in 2009 as well), Williams said, its less about money. Were looking at walk-up ticket sales every day, but owner Jerry Reinsdorf hasnt given me any monetary restrictions.

However, in case you think Williams took any joy getting out into the soothing, open air of the ballpark only to be hounded with questions about this and that waiver claim, well, the genial GM concluded his session thusly: And these are my waiver wire answers for tomorrow, too.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Bill Melton tells all about his life in baseball

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AP

White Sox Talk Podcast: Bill Melton tells all about his life in baseball

Bill Melton's baseball career is the stuff of legend — some for what happened on the field, but also for what happened off of it.

On the latest White Sox Talk Podcast, the former White Sox slugger speaks with Chuck Garfien about winning the 1971 home run crown on the final day of the regular season after partying on Rush Street into the wee hours the night before. Melton also describes his huge public battle with then White Sox play-by-play announcer Harry Caray, partying at Hugh Hefner's Playboy Club, hanging out with Frank Sinatra, fighting with former Angels manager Dick Williams.

Melton tells these stories and many more about the wild days of playing major league baseball in the 1970s. Plus, you'll hear a lost interview from 1971 when Brent Musburger interviewed Melton right after he became the home run king.

Listen to the latest episode below:

Top 10 storylines from the White Sox minor league season

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USA TODAY

Top 10 storylines from the White Sox minor league season

White Sox prospects received more attention from fans and media this year and on Sunday the White Sox minor league season concluded with rookie level Great Falls dropping the decisive game in the Pioneer League Championship.

Here's a look at some of the standout players, storylines and moments from the season that was, from Yoan to Eloy to Robert.

1. Yoan Moncada gets called up to make his White Sox debut after seven-player trade with Yankees

Yoan Moncada wasn't only the top White Sox prospect but the top prospect in baseball according to some, so when he was the first big prospect in the club's rebuild to get called up, it was a significant moment. Moncada mania began with a standing ovation from the home fans in his debut. He drew a walk in his first plate appearance and later said his White Sox debut had a similar feeling to his major league debut with the Red Sox.

2. Eloy Jimenez’s arrival and immediate hot streak

Trading Jose Quintana to the Cubs wasn't an easy pill for White Sox fans to swallow. With that in mind, it's a good thing that Eloy Jimenez quickly turned public perception of the trade in the White Sox favor. Jimenez had good, but not great numbers with the Cubs' Carolina League affiliate Myrtle Beach (.271/.351/.490) when he was traded. Jimenez had missed some time due to injury, but staying in the same league, he erupted with the Winston-Salem Dash. In 29 games with the Dash, Jimenez hit .345/.410/.682 and blasted eight home runs.

One of the highlights was when Jimenez told teammate Ian Clarkin, who arrived from the Yankees just days after the Quintana-Jimenez trade, that he was going to hit a home run. After Jimenez did in fact go yard that game, Clarkin shared Jimenez's prescient call on Twitter.

Jimenez provided more magic by blasting a home run in his first at-bat for Double-A Birmingham. In 18 games with the Barons, Jimenez hit .353/.397/.559 and solidified his spot as one of the best hitting prospects in the game. He has impressed the White Sox and Jimenez thinks he is ready to play in the majors.

3. The Luis Robert saga

With the major league team struggling on the field, the off the field moves attracted most of the attention. The chase for Cuban free agent Luis Robert riled up Sox fans, who were eating up the latest news and rumors about the then-teenage prospect.

When the Sox landed Robert, it was another big move for a quickly improving farm system. The outfielder has received high praise from around baseball.

After signing Robert played in the Dominican Summer League. He missed some time with minor injuries, but finished hitting .310/.491/.536.

4. Michael Kopech dominates in Double-A

Along with Moncada, Kopech was a big part of the Chris Sale trade. When the White Sox got him he was a hard-throwing 20-year-old who had plenty of strikeouts, but also plenty of walks.

After continuing that trend for the first three months of this season, something appeared to click for Kopech. The former first-round pick walked 11 batters in 44 1/3 innings in his final eights starts with Birmingham. He struck out a whopping 58 during that stretch and earned a late-season promotion to Triple-A Charlotte.

When he was in Birmingham, Kopech created buzz the Barons hadn't seen since Michael Jordan. He finished tied for fifth in the minors with 172 strikeouts on the season, which impressed the White Sox front office and earned him Southern League Most Outstanding Pitcher.

5. Lucas Giolito and Reynaldo Lopez make White Sox debuts

Moncada was the first major prospect to get promoted in the White Sox rebuild, but Reynaldo Lopez and Lucas Giolito represented the first pitching prospects to join the big league club. Both joined the White Sox in the Adam Eaton trade in the offseason, had major league experience and began the year in Triple-A.

Lopez's debut came first. After rolling off a hot July in which he posted a 2.10 ERA, Lopez pitched a quality start on Aug. 11 in his White Sox debut.

Meanwhile, Giolito waited a little bit longer after struggling for much of the year in Charlotte. He had a 5.40 ERA in his first 16 starts for the Knights, but found some consistency later in the year and drew rave reviews when he made his Sox debut on Aug. 22.

6. Breakout years for Alec Hansen and Dane Dunning

Lopez and Giolito received most of the attention in the Eaton trade, but in the early part of the season it was Dunning who was making the most noise in the minor leagues. The 2016 first-round pick utterly dominated the opposition in Single-A Kannapolis with a 0.35 ERA and 33 strikeouts against just two walks in 26 innings. Dunning got promoted to Winston-Salem and finished tied for 11th in all of the minors with 168 strikeouts, capping off a stellar first full season in pro ball.

Amazingly, Dunning may have been outshined by his own teammate. Alec Hansen, who the White Sox drafted in the second round last year, didn't get promoted out of Kannapolis as quickly, but dominated in Winston-Salem and finished the year in Birmingham. He ended up leading all of minor league baseball with 191 strikeouts and he thinks 2018 could be even better.

7. White Sox draft Jake Burger in the first round and he hits for a cycle

The White Sox will have a higher draft pick next year, but this year the Sox picked up Missouri State third baseman Jake Burger with the No. 11 pick.

Burger began his pro career hot by hitting .358 in Kannapolis, but slumped the rest of way. Burger hit .219 in August and September, but did hit for a cycle on Aug. 24.

8. Zack Collins struggles at the plate, but shows defensive improvements

When Zack Collins was drafted by the White Sox with the 10th pick in 2016, he was thought of as a sure-thing bat with question marks about his ability to play catcher. So naturally, his 2017 played out in exactly the opposite way.

He hit .223 in Winston-Salem while striking out 118 times in 426 plate appearances, but got promoted to Double-A Birmingham anyway. He got promoted the same day as Eloy Jimenez and both homered in their Birmingham debuts. Collins posted an .893 OPS in Birmingham, but still hit just .235.

Collins received better reviews about his defense, which he owes partially due to training with Dodgers catcher Yasmani Grandal, a fellow University of Miami product.

9. Zack Burdi’s Tommy John Surgery

When Zack Burdi was with the White Sox in spring training, he was trying to act like he belonged in big league camp. The fire-balling relief prospect was in line to be the White Sox closer of the future.

After beginning the season in Triple-A Charlotte and producing uneven, but promising results, the White Sox learned in July that Burdi would need Tommy John Surgery. A look at the White Sox bullpen now shows a lot of young, unproven pitchers and Burdi likely would be among them had he stayed healthy.

Now, it's all about the recovery for the 22-year-old, whose upside combined with the lack of proven arms in the White Sox bullpen means he remains a potentially key part of the team's future.

10. Micker Adolfo flashes power potential

Micker Adolfo wasn't a high-profile prospect at the start of the year, but had a breakout season. The 21-year-old was a big international signing back in 2013, coming with a $1.6 million signing bonus.

He was named the White Sox minor league player of the month for both May and June. He began to show his power potential with Kannapolis and helped the team make it to the South Atlantic League Championship Series. Adolfo slowed in the second half, but finished with 16 home runs, tied for fifth in the league.

Bonus: Nicky Delmonico shines in short big league stint

It wasn't a big deal at the time, but Nicky Delmonico's promotion has looked like a potentially significant moment for the White Sox rebuild. He has had a breakout performance in the majors and has made a strong case that he could be a significant part of the team's future.