Chicago White Sox

Poetry in Pros: Guillen stays, Williams goes

Poetry in Pros: Guillen stays, Williams goes

Thursday, Aug. 26, 2010
8:46 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

Given the controversies that have hounded Chicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen almost from the beginning of the season, he cant be blamed for wondering whether he will always be welcome at U.S. Cellular Field.

But the feisty skipper currently piloting the second-place club in the American League Central once again made it clear on Thursday that for as much bravado as he packs in his belief that if he ever was fired, he wouldnt be out of work long, he didnt plan to manage elsewhere anytime soon.

I was looking for a house in Chicago this morning. People think Im lying, Guillen said. I have a beautiful house back in Miami and in Caracas Venezuela, but Chicago is the place I live the most.

Guillen is currently signed to manage the White Sox through the 2011 season, and the team holds an option to extend him to 2012. While Guillen doesnt claim hed pout over an extension, clearly hed like to be rewarded for his consistently good work in the managers chair, emphasizing today how happy he was that his team had bounced back from a 9.5 games deficit to reach first place and remain in close contention3.5 gamesin the American League Central.

I like competition. I like to compete, Guillen said. I like people to ask me questions and second-guess me. I like people to hate me. I like that. Why not? Im not a perfect guy. Some people love me, some people hate me. I like that. I like to compete and make those players compete.

Guillens tardy pregame sessionwhich found media members waiting for a good half-hour in the dugout, then herded into his managers office, then back out to the dugout after the managers meeting with GM Ken Williams went overtimequickly took on a bit of a dissertational direction.

Asked how was feeling in a season that seemed especially trying both on and off the field, the Chisox jefe again replied with total honesty.

My energy, its good, Guillen said. It could be worse. Right now, Im fighting through it the dog days, and Im fine. Sometimes you leave this ballpark like, My God, wow, Im bad and tired of it, but then you go to sleep and come back and come back with the same energy.

The day I dont want to come here, I will retire. Ill send you media a note: Thank you for the support, Ill see you guys later. You know when I feel bad? When I walk from the car to the ballpark and you see those guys, the vendorsthey are pulling for us because the only way they make money is when we win.

Youre in this game for two reasonsto put a ring on your finger and get players to play well for you.

While Guillen again reiterated that he didnt need any new players to take the AL Central away from the Minnesota Twins (Im very happy with this ballclub I dont want anybody else), Williams is charged with examining every possible acquisition that could spell the difference between first and second place at seasons end.

To wit, the GM was less giddy than Guillen over the White Sox, saying before Thursdays game that, Theyll give me confidence when they string together some wins.

Williams also expressed a bit of exasperation at the consistent questioning about X or Y player, saying, People dont understand, but everybody goes through waivers, every year. If youre in the major leagues, youre put on waivers.

The GM acknowledged that while an ideal waiver claim would be of the Alex Rios 2009 variety, a player who could help both now and in the long term, such now-and-later players are rare on the wire.

And as for the concern that a certain playerdont just think Manny Ramirezmight be out of Chicagos range money-wise (a Rios concern in 2009 as well), Williams said, its less about money. Were looking at walk-up ticket sales every day, but owner Jerry Reinsdorf hasnt given me any monetary restrictions.

However, in case you think Williams took any joy getting out into the soothing, open air of the ballpark only to be hounded with questions about this and that waiver claim, well, the genial GM concluded his session thusly: And these are my waiver wire answers for tomorrow, too.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

How Nicky Delmonico's ability to bunt for a hit has played a role in his hot start

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USA TODAY

How Nicky Delmonico's ability to bunt for a hit has played a role in his hot start

Put the shift on against Nicky Delmonico and he’s going to drop down a bunt to beat you.

The White Sox rookie has tried his solution for shift-happy defenses already three times this season and it’s worked in each instance.

And while its undoubtedly the long ball -- he’s hit five home runs -- that has caught everyone’s attention during the White Sox rookie’s unbelievable start, don’t overlook the little things, especially Delmonico’s ability to bunt for a hit and the impact it’s had on opposing defenses.

Whenever opponents try to employ a shift, and they’ve done it more often this season, Delmonico has shown no fear in trying to beat them with a bunt down the third-base line.

He bunted for a single in Sunday’s win when he reached base three times to bring his on-base percentage to .451 through 71 plate appearances. There’s no question that forcing defenses to play him straight up is partly responsible for Delmonico reaching base safely in 15 of 17 games to start his major league career.

“It opens up a hole,” Delmonico said. “There’s been a lot of times in Charlotte where you hit a hard ground ball through the four hole and think it’s a hit, but then there’s a guy deep in right field. You want those (to be hits). Any time you can take advantage of bunting and show you can bunt they’ll move out of the shift.”

Take a look at Delmonico’s spray chart and it’ll tell you he’s pull-happy. He’s pulled 47.9 percent of all balls put in play since reaching the majors, according to Fangraphs.com. Were he to be qualified for a batting title, Delmonico would currently be 15th in pull percentage in baseball, easily within range of leader Salvador Perez’s 54.6 percent.

Either way, Delmonico’s spray chart is the type that often leads defenses to load up three gloves on the right side of the infield no matter the count (teams tend to shift to a hitter’s pull side most often with two strikes).

But Delmonico has made them think twice --- at least early in the count.

“Any time I see them all over that’s when it’s the best time to lay one down,” Delmonico said. “You’ve just got to get it past the pitcher and fair.”

You also have to catch the attention of advance scouts. Based on the way he’s been defended so far, hitting coach Todd Steverson thinks opponents have taken notice of Delmonico’s skills.

“It’s got to be in their notes,” Steverson said. “It’s got to be in their data: “This guy will bunt.” Even just the words “he will bunt” keeps somebody close for a minute before they move to another spot. If you have none, then they don’t have to do nothing.

“They want to play him in the full shift. That’s what they did to him from the get-go. He dropped two bunts down on them and said ‘Ok.’ ”

Delmonico said he’s seen an increased number of shifts since reached Triple-A two years ago.

“But it was all different kinds of shifts,” Delmonico said. “Very rarely I would see them all over until two strikes.”

Delmonico works on bunting the same as anyone else. There’s the round he takes each day at the start of batting practice each day. And every few weeks or so, Charlotte brought out the pitching machine.

But what may make him standout are his confidence and conviction. While Delmonico realizes he may be taking the potential for extra bases out of his hands for one at-bat, he’s knows he’s still giving himself a chance to jumpstart a rally and he’s creating a world of opportunities for the rest of his trips to the plate.

“I feel like they’re pretty good,” Delmonico said. “I’ve worked a lot on it the last two years because I know eventually they will shift and to get that hole open you’ve got to prove to them that you will bunt.

“Overall it helps you out and two, it gives you a chance to get on base and get going. That’s the biggest thing for me.”

White Sox Road Ahead: Lucas Giolito, Carson Fulmer set for first White Sox starts

White Sox Road Ahead: Lucas Giolito, Carson Fulmer set for first White Sox starts

On this week's Honda Road Ahead, sponsored by Chicagoland and Northwest Indiana Honda dealers, Bill Melton and Chuck Garfien talk about the upcoming starts for young pitchers Carson Fulmer and Lucas Giolito.

With the White Sox rebuild sucking up all the attention from fans of the team this year, Lucas Giolito and Carson Fulmer have been names in any conversation about the future of the team.

Fulmer, the first-round pick of the White Sox in 2015, made his big league debut with the White Sox last year, but it was as a reliever. This time Fulmer will get the start in the second game of Monday's doubleheader against the Twins.

In eight relief appearances with the White Sox last season, he walked seven in 11 2/3 innings with 10 strikeouts and an 8.49 ERA. This season Fulmer has returned to starting with Triple-A Charlotte and has a 5.61 ERA with 95 strikeouts and 63 walks in 122 innings.

"I'd like to see Carson Fulmer throw more strikes," Melton said. "Maybe that's all I want to see because I remember when he was here last year he had a tough time coming out of the pen because he was a starter and he wasn't throwing a lot of strikes. So I think the key for me to watch him is, just forget about guys getting hits or hitting balls out of the park, I want to see if he's getting it over the plate, how many times he's ahead of the hitters."

Giolito will make his White Sox debut on Tuesday. Like Fulmer, the 23-year-old has some major league experience. Giolito pitched 21 1/3 innings in four starts and two relief appearances last year with the Nationals. He posted a 6.75 ERA with 11 strikeouts and 12 walks.

The White Sox acquired Giolito in the Adam Eaton trade in the offseason and he hasn't had the smoothest of seasons as a teammate of Fulmer's in Charlotte. The 6-foot-6 right-hander has a 4.48 ERA with 134 strikeouts and 59 walks in 128 2/3 innings for the Knights.

Those numbers aren't going to excite fans, but he has been pitching better lately. In his last five starts, Giolito has a 1.71 ERA (six earned runs in 31 2/3 innings) with 28 strikeouts and 11 walks.

"This is a tall guy, he's a velocity guy, he's a strikeout guy so I'm going to be watching that," Melton said. "And again, nerves. There's nothing wrong with that. First time in front of a Chicago fan base and stuff like that. But a guy that big, I'm more interested in seeing how his breaking ball is. If he starts bouncing it in the dirt, a little nervous. He's got such a good one. I want to see him get ahead of the hitters and see how he puts them away."

Watch the video above to see Garfien and Melton talk about the two White Sox pitching prospects.