Chicago White Sox

Poetry in Pros: Revolving Bullpen, Threets to DL

Poetry in Pros: Revolving Bullpen, Threets to DL

Saturday, Aug. 28, 2010
7:56 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

With all the talk surrounding Manny Ramirez, the Chicago White Sox and GM Ken Williams may want to shift the focus to the left-field space behind where Manny Ramirez soon could be roaming at U.S. Cellular Field.

Indeed, with Fridays season-ending injury to Erick Threets, who will be undergoing Tommy John surgery on his left elbow after tearing his ulnar collateral ligament, the need for bullpen help has seemingly leaped past the so-called shortcomings of Chicagos resurgent offense.

Wanting bullpen help and finding it are two different things, as White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen indicated before Saturdays game.

Its not easy, Guillen said. If Kenny wants to bring in somebody, thats up to Kenny.

The White Sox already have J.J. Putz (knee) and Matt Thornton (forearm) on the disabled list and need to be cautious with both Bobby Jenks, who has battled back spasms, and Chris Sale, who has a hard innings cap in his first professional season. Sale is currently the only left-hander in the bullpen, flanked by two other rookies, Lucas Harrell and Carlos Torres, who was called up from Charlotte on Saturday to replace Threets.

It was a very, very sad moment. He was throwing the ball very well, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen said, adding that he sensed that something was very wrong. He knew he was hurt badly. He didnt know what to say.

Guillen indicated that with a short, delicate, inexperienced bullpen, he had one recourse in the short term.

When you have trouble in the bullpen, theres one thing youve got to do: Get the starters to go long, he said. If the starters go long, we are all right.

The skipper indicated he was hoping that Saturdays starter John Danks could pitch a complete game, but with six runs allowed by the lefty in the games first three innings, the southpaws pitches piled up and he was removed after just 4.1 innings, trailing 6-5.

The 28-year-old Threets had yet to allow an earned run in 2010, over 11.1 innings in 12 games. His 0.973 WHIP spoke to how well he had rectified the control issues that had plagued him in the past.

Torres will pitch in long relief for the White Sox after being a mainstay of the Knights rotation all season long. Hes 9-9 with a 3.52 ERA on the season and was 7-4 with a 3.12 ERA over his past 16 starts. Torres has held AAA opponents to a .221 batting average, striking out an International League second-best 138 batters in the process. The righty was named International League Pitcher of the Week in April, May and June, becoming the ninth player in IL history to be so honored three times in a season. He started for the White Sox on August 3 at the Detroit Tigers, pitching six innings and allowing five runs on nine hits. Torres also pitched in eight games for Chicago in 2009, going 1-2 with a 6.04 ERA.

Guillen put a smile on the circumstances regarding three Charlotte rookies (Sale, Harrell, Torres) in his bullpen.

We have two long relievers: Torres and Harrell, he said. That can save you. I still have confidence in the guys we have there. Hopefully well get through any problems, and I think we will.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

White Sox continue dealing, trade Dan Jennings to Rays for prospect

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White Sox continue dealing, trade Dan Jennings to Rays for prospect

The White Sox continued their run of trades on Thursday morning, dealing relief pitcher Dan Jennings to the Tampa Bay Rays in exchange for Casey Gillaspie.

Gillaspie, 24, was rated by MLB.com as the No. 10 prospect in the Rays organization. The switch-hitting first baseman batted .227 with nine homers, 44 RBIs and 45 runs scored in 95 games for AAA Durham.

The 6-foot-4, 240-pound left-hander began the year ranked as the No. 74 prospect in baseball by Baseball America and was a Southern League All-Star in 2016.  The first-round pick in 2014 was a New York-Penn League All-Star that year and a Midwest League All-Star in 2015.

“Casey is a recent first-round pick who has shown a quality approach at the plate with some power throughout his minor-league career,” general manager Rick Hahn said. “He gives us yet another highly touted hitter who has stood out at every level in the Rays system and increases our organizational depth as we continue to add prospects to the system.”

Casey is the young brother of Conor Gillaspie, who spent three seasons with the White Sox from 2013 to 2015.

Jennings went 3-1 with a 3.45 ERA in 48 appearances for the White Sox this season, his 48 appearances are tied for second in the American League.

Jennings tweeted a farewell to the White Sox following the trade.

It's the fourth trade the White Sox have made in July. They began by dealing starter Jose Quintana to the crosstown rival Cubs for four prospects, including 20-year old phenom Eloy Jimenez.

Hahn and the White Sox bundled David Robertson, Todd Frazier and Tommy Kahnle to the Yankees for a prospect package that included 2016 first-round pick Blake Rutherford.

The White Sox also dealt reliever Anthony Swarzak to the Brewers and received 25-year-old Ryan Cordell in return.

In a corresponding roster move to replace Jennings on the 25-man roster, the White Sox are calling up left-handed reliever Aaron Bummer, according to MLB.com's Scott Merkin.

Bummer, 23, was selected  by the White Sox in 19th round of the 2014 MLB Draft. In 28 appearances across three levels in 2017, Bummer has a 3.31 ERA and a 1.306 WHIP.

The White Sox now have just one reliever on their current roster who was also on the Opening Day roster is Jake Petricka.

Yoan Moncada predicts home run is 'first one of many that are coming'

Yoan Moncada predicts home run is 'first one of many that are coming'

Wednesday’s homer may only have been Yoan Moncada’s first, but he predicts plenty more are headed this way.

The White Sox second baseman and baseball’s top prospect crossed off another first when he blasted a solo home run in Wednesday’s loss to the Cubs. Moncada’s 417-foot drive to center field sent Cubs starter Jake Arrieta to the showers, but it wasn’t enough as the White Sox fell to the Cubs 8-3 at Guaranteed Rate Field. The round-tripper came in the 47th plate appearance of Moncada’s young career and 27 th this season.

Acquired from the Red Sox in December, Moncada made his White Sox debut on July 18 and picked up his first hit on Friday.

“It means a lot because it was the first one of many that are coming, and I’m happy,” Moncada said through an interpreter. “It has been a nice week for me.”

Moncada had already walked and struck out looking by the time he faced Arrieta in the seventh inning. The rookie fell behind Arrieta 0-2 in the count but didn’t panic and belted an 0-2 curveball on the outside corner for a solo shot to center. The drive left Moncada’s bat at 105 mph and bounced off the green tin roof in straightaway center.

“He really put a good charge into that ball,” manager Rick Renteria said. “Right off the bat, too. I mean the ball really jumped off his bat. I think it was a breaking ball, too. Stayed on it, really good swing. I think his at-bats in general were pretty good. I think both sides probably got squeezed a little bit, but I think most of the guys put together some pretty good at-bats.”

Moncada has managed to put together a nice little memorabilia package in his first eight days in the big leagues. He received the lineup card from Renteria after he debuted against the Los Angeles Dodgers last Wednesday. Moncada also retrieved his first home run ball and hoped to get the lineup card from Renteria, too.

Arrieta was satisfied with his pitch but not the location. Still, the Cubs pitcher sounded impressed by the swing Moncada put on it and the result.

“It was a good breaking ball, but not in an 0-2 count where a guy’s in swing mode,” Arrieta said. “And he put a good swing on it, especially to hit it to dead center. Pretty balanced swing. You can tell that that guy is going to have a lot of potential. He’s pretty balanced in the box, but the pitch wasn’t supposed to be there.”

The offensive production hasn’t been there as much as Moncada would like early in the season. But, he suspects that will change.

“The results are going to come step by step,” Moncada said. “I’m just trying to enjoy the moment and try to take advantage of the experience and the opportunity to play here. I’m just happy I’m having this opportunity here.”