Poetry in Pros: Sale starts... eventually


Poetry in Pros: Sale starts... eventually

Thursday, Jan. 20, 2011
11:51 PM

By Brett Ballantini

CHICAGO If Chicago White Sox rookie Chris Sale watches The Office, he got a taste of a 9-to-5 life hell likely never know on Thursday, when his cubicled phone calls to White Sox season ticketholders were bookended by a short media session held in Director of Ticket Sales Tom Sheridans corner office at U.S. Cellular Field.

Sources say Sale left with no surreptitiously-lifted highlighters or post-it notepads, but as imagined, he handled his time under the office fluorescents just as smoothly as he does ninth-inning pitches under the floodlights illuminating the diamond.

Nonplussed doesnt begin to describe the beyond-his-years cool Sale brought to Sheridans desk on Thursday, swatting away potentially tricky questions about his 2011 role with the White Sox with aplomb.

To be totally honest, to me when I pitch doesnt really matter, Sale said when asked for the first of a few times about his upcoming role, which could range anywhere from the teams fifth starter to its closer, with any number of hybrid startingrelief roles in between. I just want to pitch. Ive played baseball my entire life, and my role doesnt matter, whether its starting, middle, long or closing.

Any of those scenarios could be in the offing for Sale, although with starter Jake Peavy working well ahead of schedule as he rehabilitates from latissimus dorsi surgery last July, it appears that Sale is destined for a shorter role with the team, which would almost certainly come down to occupying Matt Thorntons old role as primary lefty setup man or succeeding Bobby Jenks as the clubs closer.

WATCH: Thornton wants closer job

While a lot of worry about an undefined role for Sale swirls around him, from coaches and fans alike, the 21-year-old is completely composed.

Sale is a hurler whose relatively innocent, videogamer-next-door looks are utterly betrayed by fearlessness and badassity on the mound. Not yet three weeks in the bigs he failed to shake off a single call from catcher A.J. Pierzynski, improbably whiffing Minnesota Twins uberhitter Joe Mauer with three straight sliders and later shrugging off the immaculate nature of such an achievement with a simple A.J. called em, I threw em explanation.

Three days later, he rapped on manager Ozzie Guillens door and asked to start a game during an ill-timed twinight doubleheader in Kansas City, offering to rescue the staff at a time when the Chisox pitching corps was beyond strapped.

So, shifting from a starting role in, say, April to short relief later in the season? Been there, done that, says the kid.

I was a starter in college and when the White Sox signed me, they put me in the pen, Sale said with a shrug. It was something to adapt to, but not that big of a transition.

Sale would have had a remarkable 2010 even if he failed in the majors, as the first and only 2010 draft choice to play in the big leagues. But Sale thrived with the White Sox, going 2-1 with a 1.93 ERA, four saves in four chances and 12.3 K9.

Keep in mind that Sale was merely adding to an immaculate 2010 season that began 11-0 in 15 starts for Florida Gulf Coast College, melted through an accelerated tutorial of 11 games with the White Soxs Single-A and Triple-A clubs, and culminated in the bigs, where Sale almost immediately resumed his dominant pitching.

Guillen recounts the story of seeing just a short bit of tape of Sale at the time of the draft in June and remarking that hes better than some of the guys he had on the major-league roster at the time now to laughter, but the managers eye has proven astute. There simply arent many better than Sale.

READ: Ozzie talks lineup, wishes Jenks well

The lefty has a good read on two things regarding his career. First, theres a healthy likelihood that hes headed to the bullpen for a second straight season, perhaps as his clubs closer. Second, as soon as 2012, hell be penciled into the White Sox rotation and will finally get to trot out and show off perhaps his best out pitch, his changeup.

Sale is optimistic about both options, in whatever order they come.

Last year was unbelievable because I got experience pitching in the big leagues, he said. If I go back to the bullpen, Thornton and Sergio Santos are there, and they can help me. I kind of know the basics already.

Sale admitted theres an adjustment to being prepared to pitch on an everyday basis vs. the longer and less frequent outings of a starter. Likewise he confessed last fall that initially, his energy would pin when the call came to the pen, rousting him into warm-ups.

All offseason, Sale has prepared to start, and he knows that the rotation is his ultimate pitching destination.

Pitching coach Don Cooper said I will eventually be a starter, whether its this year or next, or whenever, that long-term Ill be a starter, the 65 fireballer said. Im not trying to make too much of my 2011 role. Whatever they want me to do in 2011, Ill give it 100 percent.

One thing Sale hasnt put 100 percent into is the popular pastime of picking out bullpen entry music. Whether its a nod to his preference to start games or simply aw-shucks awe at being counted on as a key staff member for a ballclub with playoff aspirations, Sale claims to not have put any thought into a replacement for the misappropriated Come Sail Away Styx ditty that welcomed him to the mound in his Chicago relief appearances.

Ive gotten that question of entry music a lot, believe it or not, Sale said with a laugh. But I havent thought much about it. Whatever they play, they play, and Ill go out there and be excited to pitch no matter whats on the P.A.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs


White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs

Chuck Garfien, Slavko Bekovic and Chris Kamka react to the national media blunders that failed to recognize the White Sox as 2005 World Series champions. 

Later, the guys discuss Jerry Reinsdorf's comments about cheering for the Cubs and break down what it takes to beat the Indians. 

Check out the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast below: 

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”