Postponement, doubleheader a problem for Sox

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Postponement, doubleheader a problem for Sox

Friday, Aug. 20, 2010Updated 11:38 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

KANSAS CITY -- Back on May 26, in a game against the Cleveland Indians, umpire Joe West cost Chicago White Sox starter Mark Buehrle some innings and both Buehrle and manager Ozzie Guillen some cash when he ejected both after they protested Wests balk calls.

On Friday, he may have taken an even bigger toll on the team, choosing to start a game that was destined to be flooded out, thus preventing Chicagos starter from throwing more than seven pitches in the contest.

The storms that hit Kansas City caused power outages outside of Kauffman Stadium and also blew out the JumboTron screen inside the park.

Weather has cheated everyone before, Jackson said after facing just two Royals before the game was called, at 8:49 p.m. Unless you really just started playing baseball, Im sure youve been cheated by the weather.

As for whether Wests misjudgment of the weather angered him, Jackson demurred.

Thats Wests decision -- theres no reason to get mad over something you cant control, he said. Not to make a decision on if we start a game or not, thats his decision. Thats his call -- ask him how he feels about it.

Guillen had no comment about the postponement, literally left speechless by the circumstances. Meanwhile, the White Sox are now forced to scramble through a series theyd hope would play out a little easier than their last sets against the Detroit Tigers and Minnesota Twins.

Freddy Garcia will start Game 1 of a doubleheader that will begin at 6:10 p.m. Saturday. The starter for Game 2, estimated to start at approximately 9:30 p.m. (a half-hour after the conclusion of Game 1), has not been announced by the White Sox.

Royals starter Sean OSullivan set down all three White Sox to begin the game. As rain started falling and quickly came faster, Jackson walked Royals leadoff man Gregor Blanco and was facing Jason Kendall when the game was delayed.

Kansas City officials could have chosen to play a daynight doubleheader on Saturday, providing Game 1 started before 12:10 p.m. and Game 2 began after 6:05, due to FOXs national broadcasting blackout on Saturday afternoons. Its a fair speculation that continuing bad weather into early Saturday ruled out a split doubleheader.

Now the White Sox are faced with chasing their weakest starter of late (Garcia) with an X-factor (a minor-league callup, or a patchwork effort starting with long reliever Tony Pena) on what shapes up to be a lost day of pitching for Chicago. Consider that the White Sox will be facing K.C. ace Zack Greinke on a Sunday afternoon turnaround game (1:10 p.m.), and the Royals could well steamroll a Sox club eager to build on the momentum of Thursdays 11-0 drubbing of the Twins.

Meanwhile Jackson, who was 1-0 with a 1.35 ERA in his first three starts with the White Sox, gets robbed of a start at a time when the club desperately needs him.

A week and a half between starts? Pretty much thats what it is, Jackson said. No need to get mad, theres nothing you can do about it. You just have to take it as is, I guess. You can get mad all you want, but its not going to change the fact that all you can do is get ready for the next start.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

White Sox agree to one-year deals with Brett Lawrie, Avisail Garcia

White Sox agree to one-year deals with Brett Lawrie, Avisail Garcia

Brett Lawrie and Avisail Garcia will both return to the White Sox in 2017.

The team announced it reached deals with both players shortly before Friday’s 7 p.m. CST nontender deadline. Lawrie will earn $3.5 million next season and Garcia received a one-year deal for $3 million.

The club didn’t tender a contract to right-handed pitcher Blake Smith, which leaves its 40-man roster at 38.

Acquired last December for a pair of minor leaguers, Lawrie hit .248/.310/.413 with 12 home runs, 22 doubles and 36 RBIs in 94 games before he suffered a season-ending injury.

Lawrie produced 0.9 f-WAR when he suffered what then-manager Robin Ventura described a “tricky” injury on July 21. Despite numerous tests and a lengthy rehab, Lawrie never returned to the field and was frustrated by the experience. Last month, Lawrie tweeted that he believes the cause of his injury was wearing orthotics for the first time in his career.

He was projected to earn $5.1 million, according to MLBTraderumors.com and earned $4.125 million in 2016.

Garcia hit .245/.307/.385 with 12 homers and 51 RBIs in 453 plate appearances over 120 games. The projected salary for Garcia, arb-eligible for the first time, was $3.4 million.

The team also offered contracts to Miguel Gonzalez and Todd Frazier, who are eligible for free agency in 2018, first baseman Jose Abreu and relievers Dan Jennings, Zach Putnam and Jake Petricka, among others.

The White Sox have until mid-January to reach an agreement with their arbitration-eligible players. If they haven’t, both sides submit figures for arbitration cases, which are then heard throughout February.

White Sox announcer Jason Benetti cracks Crain's 40 under 40

White Sox announcer Jason Benetti cracks Crain's 40 under 40

Crain's Chicago Business released its latest 40 under 40 project and White Sox announcer Jason Benetti made this year's list.

The 33-year-old just finished his first season with the White Sox as play-by-play announcer, working the home games at U.S. Cellular Field (before it was renamed Guaranteed Rate Field last month) alongside Steve Stone as longtime broadcaster Hawk Harrelson saw his workload reduced to mostly road games.

Benetti quickly became a fan favorite among Chicagoans on CSN and other networks in 2016 and his cerebral palsy became more of a backstory, with his work alongside Stone and his affable sense of humor taking center stage instead.

Among other topics, Benetti discussed how he approaches his job of broadcasting for the team he grew up rooting for:

Law school taught me that there are always two sides of the argument. I see it from the Sox prism, but I can’t believe in my heart of hearts that, if the Sox lose, the world’s over anymore. That first game, I was like, “All right, it’s just a game.” And then Avi Garcia hits a homer late in the game against the Indians and I call it like I would call it with a little more. And as the ball cleared the fence, when it was rolling around, I got a slight tear in my eye. And I was like, “What’s that?”

Check out the entire interview with Benetti and the full list at ChicagoBusiness.com.