Quentin loses Little League, wins Player of Week


Quentin loses Little League, wins Player of Week

Monday, April 4, 2011Posted: 4:45 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini

KANSAS CITYHe may have lost the video game battle with fellow Chicago White Sox slugger Adam Dunn, but Carlos Quentin edged out his brawny teammate on the field, being named the first American League Player of the Week this season for his opening weekend outburst vs. the Cleveland Indians.

Quentin went 6-11 in three starts over the weekend, getting on base at a .583 clip and slugging 1.091 for an outrageous 1.674 OPS. While the White Sox mostly pummeled Wahoos pitching, slugging at a .459 clip, only Dunns eight total bases approach Quentins tidy dozen in Cleveland. Through three games, Quentin leads the AL in batting average (.545) and is tied for the lead in doubles (three) and RBI (seven).

Like that of many of his teammates, Quentins hitting approach to start the season has been ideal, driving the ball deep into the opposite-field gap.

His five RBI on Opening Day were the most by a White Sox player since Sammy Sosa also tapped in five in 1991, while Quentins seven RBI in the first two games of the season were the most for the White Sox since Minnie Minoso also had seven, in 1960.

After his Opening Day slugging, Quentin was typically low-key and sober, noting that he was just trying to keep his groove going and not over-thinka key impediment to his success in the past: Hitting is a thing you dont talk about too much because when its going well, you want to leave it as it is.

In winding up his brief remarks on Friday, Quentin rather hilariously noted, as only Q can, in unintentionally deadpan fashion: Im ecstatic. We won.

After a 2-4, two-double, two-RBI chaser on Saturday, Quentin opted out of a postgame interview, instead competing with Dunn on the visiting clubhouses classic Nintendo system. First up was Super Mario Kart, in which Quentin severely underperformed, immediately burning all of his speed boosters and spending more than one race driving counterclockwise (the wrong way). White Sox teammates Dunn, Matt Thornton, and John Danks had several laughs at Quentins expense, while the Cleveland clubhouse attendants were in near-tears listening to the clubs running commentary on Qs prowess behind the wheel.

After the massacre, Quentin opted for a game I can win, Little League Baseball. Dunnpossibly playing possumclaimed to be unfamiliar with the workings (how do I bunt? What, no bunting?) but, according to Dunn the next day and corroborated by the chuckling of Brent Lillibridge, the new White Sox slugger upset Quentin in their Little League game, 4-2.

On Sunday, Quentin was a mere 1-3 off of Justin Masterson, with an infield hit to third in his first at-bat. His second time up, Quentin walked and advanced to second on an A.J. Pierzynski single. When Alexei Ramirez popped out on his sacrifice bunt attempt, both Quentin and Pierzynski were caught far off base and became victims of the first triple play turned vs. the White Sox in 33 seasons.

Both general manager Ken Williams and manager Ozzie Guillen have called a successful year by Quentin as the most important component to a White Sox playoff appearance. After several attempts by both men to get Quentin to stop over-thinking and ease up on himself, Guillen finally gave up in spring training, saying he will just let Carlos be Carlos and stop trying to change him. So far, so good.

The weekly honor is the second of Quentins career. He was named the AL Player of the week for June 21-27, 2010 as well.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”

White Sox name Chris Getz Director of Player Development

White Sox name Chris Getz Director of Player Development

The White Sox announced on Friday they have named former MLB infielder Chris Getz as Director of Player Development.

Getz replaces Nick Capra, who after five seasons in his position was named the White Sox third base coach on Oct. 14.

The 33-year-old Getz has spent the last two years with the Kansas City Royals as a baseball operations assistant/player development in which he assisted in minor-league operations and player personnel decisions.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

“I'm excited about the opportunity to help teach and develop young talent in the organization where my professional career began,” Getz said in a press release. “I was drafted twice, worked through the minor leagues, and reached the major leagues with the White Sox. Through this journey, I was able to gain an understanding of the individuals within this organization, who I respect greatly.  The director of player development is an important role, and the health of the minor-league system is vital for major-league success.  I look forward to putting my all into making the White Sox a strong and winning organization.”
White Sox Senior VP/general manager Rick Hahn added: “We are pleased to add Chris’ intellect, background and energy to our front office. He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago.”

Getz, originally a fourth-round selection by the White Sox in the 2005 MLB Draft out of Michigan, played in seven MLB seasons with the White Sox (2008-09), Royals (2010-13) and Blue Jays (2014).

Getz had a career slash line of .250/.309/.307 with three home runs, 111 RBI and 89 stolen bases.