Reinsdorf: Rebuilding would've been 'horrible'

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Reinsdorf: Rebuilding would've been 'horrible'

Thursday, March 17, 2011
Posted: Wednesday, March 16, 2011 3:48 PM Updated: 2:50 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. In a detailed and revealing chat with team beat writers, White Sox owner Jerry Reinsdorf opened up about a wide variety of topics, from his teams status as division favorites, the feisty White Sox fan base, the Ozzie-Kenny feud, even his own mortality. Naturally, Reinsdorf led off with his take on being all-In and just how close he came to tearing down and rebuilding his club for the 2011 season.

The 75-year-old owner spoke on his Camelback Ranch office patio, overlooking the ballpark complex he spurred the building of, prior to his ballclub taking on the defending champion San Francisco Giants on Wednesday afternoon.

Truly All-In?

As ballyhooed as the White Soxs effort to catch the Minnesota Twins by going All-In with a club-record 125 million payroll, Reinsdorf basically was backed into pushing all his chips to the middle of the table.

Last year, we finished second, six games out, Reinsdorf said with regard to going All-In for 2011. And the question really was how do we get better than Minnesota and stay ahead of Detroit. We didnt draw very well last year; essentially we broke even financially. So the first thing Kenny and I decided we were going to do was rebuild, because we just didnt feel we could count on the attendance supporting the level we had to get to spend to get better to beat Minnesota.

Reinsdorf didnt just want to lower the payroll and leave his team gutted, however. Further complicating matters: Team brass didnt figure the draft picks earned by losing Paul Konerko and A.J. Pierzynski would do enough to rebuild the team.

Taking into account opposing teams trying to buy low on talent the team made available, Reinsdorf was cornered: It didnt look like we could get enough back in trade, so all we would end up doing was having a worse team with a low payroll. We would make money, but we wouldnt be building for the future. I didnt mind taking a step back, because weve done it before. But I didnt want to take a step back without feeling really good that step back was going to help us going forward.

So if taking his team fully-out wasnt going to work, Reinsdorf flipped the script and started considering how his team could immediately catch the Twins.

What would we have to do to get better than Minnesota? We were going to have to spend more money, Reinsdorf said. We felt we could take a chanceit was a better alternative than getting bad for two or three years.

When he broke it all down, the direction of the team came crystal-clear to the longtime owner, delivered to his roundtable in typically precise fashion: The idea of being bad for two or three years is a horrible thought when youre 75 years old.

Division favorites?

Reinsdorf was demure when asked to pick the White Sox to win the AL Central in 2011, citing a prediction he made in 1991 where he tabbed the Twins as a seventh-place team, whereupon prompting Minnesota to go out and win a World Series.

We can compete with the Twins, Reinsdorf offered. Minnesota, Detroit, the White Sox, any one of those teams could win.

The owner does see one advantage the White Sox may have on their division rivals, however.

The nice thing, for us to win, we dont have to have guys with exceptional years, he said. All were asking or hoping for is everyone has his normal year. If everybody has his normal year, we should be in it all the way.

Jerry built it; will they come?

If the Chairman knows anything about White Sox fans in his 30 years helming the club, its that the fan base is a show-me groupblind faith comes in short supply on the South Side. So Reinsdorf knows that starting out strong is a key to turning a profit in 2011.

We know if we do get off to a good start and we do draw, well probably cover the payroll, he said. If we cant, we still have the resources where we could sustain a loss this year, if we had to.

Reinsdorf noted that there had been no overall increase in season ticket sales in 2011 compared with 2010: Were running right about where we were last year. Our fans are optimistic and enthusiastic but they want to see success out on the field.

But the headmaster bristled when the notion of the White Sox asking too much of fans was brought up.

We put the risk on ourselves. Were spending the money, Reinsdorf said. We never expected people to go wild and buy tickets like mad. We know we have to prove we have a team worthy of winning the division. If we do, well draw better. Last years attendance 2,194,378 was the lowest in a long time since 1,930,537 in 2004, so its obvious we have enough fans to come out and have us draw a break-even attendance of 2.6 million, 2.7, 2.8, if they like what they see.

Despite the fact that White Sox fans traditionally take on a show-me stance with regard to catching Sox fever, Reinsdorf noted that team sponsorships running ahead of expectations, a key element of team revenue.

There are some good signs, he said. The White Sox fans really break into two categoriesprobably all teams fans do. Hardcore fans are going to come out no matter what you dothey want to see the White Sox. But you have to also draw the front-runners If they hear were playing well, then theyll come out.

Ozzie-Kenny bromance

As the White Sox father figure to bother GM Ken Williams and manager Ozzie Guillen, Reinsdorf felt a unique sense of responsibility to see that fences were mended after last years he-saidhe-said war of words and chin-jutted posturing. But that mending wasnt as difficult as people think.

That was foolishness that grew out of Oney Guillens Twitters or Tweets or whatever they are called. Thats not going to happen again, Reinsdorf said. Ozzie and Ken have too much of a history of getting along and working. Theres a natural tension between managers and general managers; it always exists and it will flare up from time to time. Right now, they are on the same page.

Reinsdorf also feels that the extent of the relationship being damaged has been overblown by media and the fans.

I dont think they have ever not been on the same page as far as the team is concerned, he said. This was just personal bickering, and they got it behind them.

As for a recurrence of the so-called foolishness, the owner was supremely confident there would be no relapse.

They both realized that there was a certain childishness, Reinsdorf said. I didnt have any long conversations with these guys. I didnt sit them down and say, You guys have to get along. I didnt beat either up individually. I just said to each of them, You guys really need to work together, and they both agreed in like 10 seconds and said Youre right.

I would be surprised if the two of them are not here for a long time.
The Guillen trade

Reinsdorf was also clear about the non-existence of any trade with the Florida Marlins involving Guillen.

There wasnt going to be a trade, he said. The Marlins approached us about wanting to talk to Ozzie. OK. We couldnt trade Ozziehe has a contract to manage the White Sox. If he asked we could let him out of his contractI love Ozzie, but if Ozzie didnt want to be here, I would consider letting him out of his contract. But not for nothing.

With the understanding that talks would only move forward at a cost, Reinsdorf drew upon his pristine negotiating skills and turned up the heat on South Florida.

I said to the Marlins, If you want to talk to him, we have to agree on what we get if he decides to leave, Reinsdorf said. We couldnt agree on that. If we had been able to agree, Ozzie probably still wouldnt have left. We couldnt have traded himand we would have tried to keep him. I would have gone to Ozzie and said, OK, the Marlins want to talk to you and weve given them permission to talk to you, but I hope to God you dont leave. It would have been his decision, not our decision.

Reinsdorf is also just as enamored of his young manager as ever.

Ive known Ozzie since he was 21 years old, and I remember thinking at the time acquiring him from the San Diego Padres, his rookie year, that Ive never seen somebody this young with the baseball instincts he had, the Chairman said. He always had a brilliant baseball mind, and as he got older, it just got better. He knows how to run a game He just understands baseball. He knows not to ask a guy to do something he cant do.

Tony LaRussa told me years ago that the biggest thing a manager has to do is put players in a position where they can do what they are capable of doing and never ask them to do things they cant do, and Ozzie is real good at that. Hes up there with what I would consider the really good managers in the game.

Pale Hose future is bright

Reinsdorf was bullish on the future and was clearly delighted that going all-in wasnt going to compromise the long-term health of his South Side club.

I feel very good, he said. Weve got some talent thats coming. Paulie is tied up for a few years, A.J. a couple years, Adam Dunn, Gordon Beckhams young, Alexei Ramirezs young.

Reinsdorf also tipped his hand about the kind of scouting reports hes been getting, citing Jordan Danks by name in saying he has looked very good this spring, and probably a year from now we will see him.

Of course, Reinsdorf has been giddy about his team before and been burned.

There is a lot of talent coming, but its a crazy game, he said. Its hard to plan for more than one year at a time, although the talent is in place now for the future.
Gut-punch to Scott Boras

Asked about how he determines when to commit to a young player, as the White Sox did this offseason in extending Ramirez for at least four years, Reinsdorf was honest in saying, First, Kenny and assistant GM Rick Hahn have to say they want to commit to a guy. Its different for each player as to when is the right time. And you can be wrong. You can obviously make a mistake.

Then, he cited a onetime fan favorite.

Sometimes, the agent makes a mistake. We were ready to commit to Joe Crede, and Scott Boras didnt want to talk about it. Look what thats cost Crede.
F-you money

Clearly, the owner is no different from many White Sox fans, in that one of Reinsdorfs favorite players is his routine Opening Day starter.

I love Mark Buehrle, Reinsdorf said. Hes just a fun guy. He knows hes made a lot of money, and the way he lives, there is no way he will spend all the money that hes made.

When I was younger, when I sold my business and friends sold theirs, we said now we have f-you money. Buehrles got f-you money.

Asked to clarify, Reinsdorf laughed and said, Lets say he has enough money to be independent.

Translated into baseball termsespecially in light of Buehrles inability to stop answering questions about retirementthe owner was clear.

Mark Buehrle is not going to want to play if he cant pitch up to his standards, Reinsdorf said. Hes not going to want to be a 5-12 guy. As long as he enjoys playing, hell want to keep playing. When he wants to quit, he knows hes got enough money.
Mortality

With his boyhood idol Duke Snider passing away recently and with a number of close friends passing away recently, the delicate topic of mortality did come up in our conversation. But the 75-year-old owner was in great spirits after getting some good news from his annual physical at the Mayo Clinic.

Youre catching me on a really good day, Reinsdorf smiled. I had my stress test and they told me the amount of time I was on the treadmill was normal for a 52-year-old. So Im feeling real good today.

Reinsdorfs dry humor was on full display, however, continuing, Now Ill probably get killed in an accident on the way home. But as Los Angeles Dodgers broadcaster Vin Scully says about guys being day-to-day, Arent we all? But at least I know my health is very good right now.

Roland Hemond and the Buck ONeil Award

Last month, longtime White Sox executive (and current Arizona Diamondbacks exec) Roland Hemond won the prestigious Buck ONeil Award for his overall service to the sport. Hemond became just the second winner of the honor, after the late ONeil himself. Reinsdorf was instrumental Hemonds win.

Im on the Hall of Fame board, so I was one of the voters, he said. Its a secret ballot, so you dont know who won. But based on the conversation before you vote it was pretty obvious Roland was going to win.

Having a good sense of Hemonds win, Reinsdorf wanted to be sure he could witness the moment the emotional Hemond would get the call from the Hall, so the owner made up a reason to meet together.

Im sitting there, and I had it all in my mind the bull---- I was going to give him about why I was there, Reinsdorf continued. Then his cell phone rang. He looked at his cell phone and said he was going to return the call. I said urgently, No, answer the phone. So he answered the phone and immediately started crying.

Hemond, still in tears, tried to call his wife, Margo, to give her the news, but couldnt find the words. So it was Reinsdorf who broke the terrific news of the Buck ONeil Award to Hemonds wife.

If you look at the criteria of the Buck ONeil Award it fits Roland in every respect, Reinsdorf said. There wasnt, I dont think, anybody close to deserving as Roland.

Jerry for the Hall?

A question about Reinsdorfs own worthiness for Hall of Fame induction was met with a dismissive, Nah.

Unfortunately, he may have a point. Look at a Hall of Fame worthy basketball center like Artis Gilmoreunquestioningly Hall-worthy, but with a career spread across three teams, without a single one retiring his jersey. Reinsdorf, having delivered seven titles to the city of Chicagoall but two of the citys total over the past 48 yearsis caught between two teams and sports, making the honor more likely for him in basketballs Naismith Hall of Fame than Cooperstown.

Weve only won one World Series and that seems to be a significant thing, adding still with a trace of bitterness that the man who moved his boyhood team to the West Coast, Walter OMalley, is enshrined, I havent moved a team out of Brooklyn. I dont know.

With another tip to his own mortality, Reinsdorf did allow for enshrinement, with a caveat: Not in my lifetime. Maybe after I die.

And that other team

Reinsdorf backtracked from quotes that had him expecting four championships from his Chicago Bulls, part of the reason he is a bit hesitant to do many interviews at all.

I didnt make any predictions for the Bulls, he explained. I said, chance, I used the word chance. It wasnt a prediction The Bulls havent won one title yet.

So, the owner was unwilling to predict how well his now top-seeded Bulls will fare in the postseason? Said Reinsdorf: Im not going to make any predictions other than I think we are going to be very competitive.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

Nick Delmonico takes advantage of fresh start with White Sox

Nick Delmonico takes advantage of fresh start with White Sox

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Given he was almost out of baseball just two years ago, White Sox farmhand Nick Delmonico never imagined he’d be where he is now.

But the former Baltimore Orioles/Milwaukee Brewers prospect feels like he has rid himself of the off-the-field issues that stunted development early in his career.

In 2014, Delmonico served a suspension for unauthorized use of Adderall and later asked for and was granted his release by Milwaukee. Now with a fresh start with the White Sox, he heads into the final week of camp with an outside shot at the roster. Though he’s likely to start the season at Triple-A Charlotte, Delmonico knows he has made tremendous progress both on and off the field the past two years.

“I definitely did not see this,” Delmonico said. “I’m very blessed to be here.

“It feels awesome. It feels like I’ve accomplished a lot just in my life to get here. Just being around my teammates is one of the biggest things I enjoy every day, just coming to the ballpark. I’m very happy and honored to be able to come here everyday.”

The White Sox weren’t sure what to expect when they signed Delmonico, 24, to a minor league deal on Feb. 11, 2015. A sixth-round pick by the Orioles in 2011, Delmonico received a $1.525 million signing bonus. He was traded to Milwaukee in July 2013 in exchange for closer Francisco Rodriguez.

Delmonico received a 50-game suspension for Adderall in 2014, which he told the Charlotte News Observer he’d used since high school for attention deficit disorder (ADD). Delmonico told the Observer he informed Milwaukee that he no longer wanted to play baseball, changed his phone number and asked for his release. He was placed on the restricted list on July 28 and never played in the Brewers farm system again.

The White Sox signed Delmonico seven months after his final game with Milwaukee and he returned to the field that June.

Delmonico requested privacy when asked about switching teams but acknowledged, “I had some past issues with some stuff that I’d like to keep to myself,” he said.

Delmonico started the 2015 season at Single-A Kannapolis and was promoted a week later to Double-A Birmingham. He finished the season with a .733 OPS and made an additional 76 plate appearances at the Arizona Fall League.

[WHITE SOX TICKETS: Get your seats right here]

Last season, Delmonico combined to hit .279/.347/.490 with 17 homers between Double-A Birmingham and Triple-A Charlotte in 110 games. That earned him an invite to big league camp, where Delmonico has displayed a swing refined the past two seasons.

Current third-base coach and former director of player development Nick Capra said Delmonico has worked hard to go from a pull hitter to one who uses the entire field. He entered Sunday hitting .268/.328/.589 with nine extra-base hits this spring in a team-high 61 plate appearance this spring.

“This kid has made a complete turnaround from when we first got him in camp,” Capra said. “He’s done everything. He’s done probably more than we expected him to do. He’s in a really great place. He has a personality that people kind of gravitate to and it’s been a blessing to have him around and see the smile on his face when he comes to work every day.”

Originally a third baseman, the White Sox have moved Delmonico around this spring. He’s logged time at first base and also in the outfield as they try to improve his versatility. If Delmonico performs well at Charlotte, there’s no reason he couldn’t eventually find his way to Chicago and succeed in the big leagues.

“We’re continuing to try to explore his ability to play third base,” manager Rick Renteria said. “He can obviously play first. We’ve started using him in left field. He’s a young man that has a bat to carry. Can hit the ball out of the ballpark. Gives you good at-bats. There’s something to him about his personality and the way he carries himself, which is infectious, which we like.”

Delmonico praised the family-feel that has been prominent in the White Sox clubhouse this spring. He had some jitters coming into his first big league camp but hasn’t allowed them to hinder anything.

He likes how Renteria and his staff have brought a young group of players together. And best of all, he’s happy to be in the right place to enjoy the experience.

“It definitely gives you confidence what you do here,” Delmonico said. “You’ve got to keep moving forward. The biggest thing for big league camp for me is learning as much as I can from everybody. And learning from myself, I’ve been able to handle things and try to pick up as much as I can.”

Rule 5 pick Dylan Covey takes advantage of showcase as White Sox down Indians

Rule 5 pick Dylan Covey takes advantage of showcase as White Sox down Indians

GOODYEAR, Ariz. — If Carlos Rodon starts on the disabled list as expected, the White Sox won't turn to any of their vaunted top prospects in the interim.

The news on Rodon has been encouraging so far as no structural damage has been discovered. Still, the White Sox won't clear Rodon until after he receives a second opinion on Monday. While the length of Rodon's absence won't be determined for several days, the White Sox are certain of one route they won't take — they don't want to disrupt the development of their young starting pitchers. Were a DL trip for Rodon necessary, the White Sox would likely select either Saturday's starter, Dylan Covey, or minor leaguer David Holmberg over their top prospects. Covey made a strong impression on Saturday afternoon with 3 2/3 scoreless innings pitched and the White Sox rallied for a 10-7 victory over the Cleveland Indians at Goodyear Ballpark.

"When you have an opportunity to stabilize action or movement for players it serves them better," White Sox manager Rick Renteria said. "They get a little more comfortable where they're at. They get comfortable with the staffs they're working with and the information they're gathering, being in a routine. It is a little disruptive going from team to team to team. It happens, but it's not the most conducive (to learning)."

The White Sox are all about development this season. Therefore, they have no plans to call upon Lucas Giolito, Reynaldo Lopez, Carson Fulmer or Michael Kopech unless they're A) ready and B) throwing every fifth day in Chicago. Renteria's comments Saturday reiterated Rick Hahn's earlier message, saying the club doesn't want to disrupt the development path.

That puts Covey, a Rule 5 draft pick in December, with a decent opportunity to make the club out of camp. Covey commanded the strike zone on Saturday only hours after Renteria said he hoped to see the young right-hander replicate an Arizona Fall League performance that initially warmed the White Sox up to him.

Aside from a two-out walk in his final inning, Covey was sharp the whole way. He allowed three hits and struck out three.

"My last couple of outings I was definitely feeling the stress," Covey said. "I was kind of pitching a little passive, pitching to not make a mistake instead of just going right after guys. So today and yesterday I just thought I'm just going to throw every pitch with conviction and see what happens. I got a lot of weak contact today and some swings and misses, so I felt good."

Covey threw 44 pitches, 27 for strikes. He potentially could stay in Arizona on Thursday and make an additional minor league start to build arm strength, which would get him to roughly 60 pitches before the regular seasons started.

The White Sox don't officially need a fifth starter until April 9 and they're off the following day. That break could allow the White Sox to start Covey as part of a bullpen day. Covey said he recently changed his mindset after lackluster results in relief this spring. The right-hander has a 6.94 ERA this spring in 11 2/3 innings.

"Obviously my last two outings out of the pen I wasn't getting crushed, but I just wasn't commanding the ball or commanding the count as much as I would like to be," Covey said. "The mistakes get hit a little harder when you're falling behind in the count. Today I wanted to have the mindset of attacking hitters, throwing everything down in the zone and going right after them, and it worked out."

The White Sox blasted six home runs in the contest, including a majestic, go-ahead grand slam by first baseman Danny Hayes in the top of the ninth inning. Hayes is hitting .351/.400/.595 with two homers and is tied for the team lead with 13 RBIs this spring. Jose Abreu, Nick Delmonico, Cody Asche, Everth Cabrera and Jacob May also homered for the White Sox.