Sale fine with not pitching in All-Star Game

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Sale fine with not pitching in All-Star Game

NEW YORK -- The White Sox' plans call for Chris Sale to start on Tuesday and again on Sunday, which may jeopardize a potential All-Star Game appearance.

But Sale said on Friday afternoon he has no issue with the schedule and thinks it would be selfish for him to think otherwise. Sale, who improved to 9-2 on Wednesday and leads the America League with a 2.27 ERA, should be a shoe-in when All-Star rosters are announced Sunday.

"I've got to pitch here before I pitch anywhere else," Sale said. "I'd hate for them to have to rearrange things for that to happen. That would be very selfish I think to do. This is important to me. This is my team. This our team. I have to do what's best for us and if that means, if I even make it, not pitching in the All-Star Game, then so be it. It would be cool, but I know we've got more important things going on."

White Sox manager Robin Ventura won't commit to his rotation as being set in stone, but didn't see any reason it would change, either. He has the ability to push Sale back another day --- the team is off Monday --- to Wednesday, which would leave Sale available for the July 10 game in Kansas City. But that appears unlikely to happen.

Even if Sale were to pitch Sunday, however, a new provision in the new Collective Bargaining Agreement leaves him available to pitch in the All-Star Game. Ventura knows what an All-Star Game appearance would mean to Sale and seems open to discussing an appearance if the left-hander is selected.

"(The All-Star Game) is a big thing for him," Ventura said. "For where he started out in spring training and going through it, it's a big deal. It's important and it's fun too for him to actually make the All-Star team and play in it. We'll kind of weigh how he's feeling and how it's going for him."

Second on the team with 95 1 3 innings pitched, Sale -- who had a precautionary MRI on his elbow on May 10 -- said he feels great. He believes the club's plan to spot him extra rest in between starts has helped him to weather any potential health issues. Even if he wouldn't pitch in Kansas City, Sale has no reservations about making the trip.

"I'd probably show up," Sale said with a smile. "Obviously I've got to talk with these guys and figure out what their plan is, and if they'd rather me have a rest, then I'd take the rest. This is what is important to me and something I want to do for the whole season. Like I said, it'd be nice if I do get selected. If I do have the opportunity to pitch, that'd be awesome. But I don't want to deviate from what we have got going on here."

White Sox will retire Mark Buehrle's number in June

White Sox will retire Mark Buehrle's number in June

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Mark Buehrle apparently has retired after all.

The longtime White Sox pitcher, who never officially called it quits, will have his No. 56 retired on June 24.

Buehrle, who won 161 games and completed at least 200 innings in 11 straight seasons for the White Sox, last pitched for the Toronto Blue Jays in 2015. The White Sox will honor their former ace — he's the 12th player in franchise history to have his number retired — before they host the Oakland A's at 1:10 p.m. in June.

Buehrle was a human highlight reel over his 12 seasons with the White Sox. Whether it was his fancy glovework, a perfect game, his no-hitter or recording a save in the 14th inning of Game 3 of the 2005 World Series, Buehrle was a South Side legend.

"Mark Buehrle is one of the most accomplished pitchers in franchise history," White Sox chairman Jerry Reinsdorf said in a statement. "Mark carried himself with class and professionalism throughout his career, and his popularity with staff, teammates and Sox fans is very well deserved. Although a very humble person, he certainly showed a flair for the dramatic on the mound, from a no-hitter to an unforgettable perfect game to a World Series title. A standout on the field and a standup teammate in the clubhouse, it is our honor to retire Mark Buehrle’s No. 56 and to welcome him into the legendary class of all-time White Sox greats."

The White Sox selected Buehrle in the 38th round of the 1998 amateur draft and he debuted in 2000, going 4-1 in 28 games (three starts). Buehrle also earned four All-Star nods while with the team (five overall) and was a three-time Rawlings Gold Glove winner (four overall). He also won two of three starts during the team's 2005 World Series run as the team snapped an 88-year championship drought.

Buehrle signed a four-year, $58-million deal with the Miami Marlins ahead of the 2012 season and was later traded to the Toronto Blue Jays. He pitched 200 innings in 14 consecutive seasons before falling four outs shy of the feat in his final campaign (2015). Though Buehrle never officially retired, he hasn’t pursued pitching for another team since.

Ex-White Sox Jesse Crain hosting charity event featuring Paul Konerko, George Brett

Ex-White Sox Jesse Crain hosting charity event featuring Paul Konerko, George Brett

GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Ex-White Sox pitcher Jesse Crain is hosting a local charity golfing event featuring Paul Konerko, Matt Thornton and Hall of Famer George Brett among others.

Crain, who pitched for the White Sox for three seasons and was an All-Star in 2013, and his wife, Becky, recently created the Crain Family Foundation to benefit children. 

The couple is hosting the Swing into Spring event at Top Golf in Scottsdale, Ariz. on Monday night, which is designed to benefit the Tandem Resource Center, Arizona RBI Baseball and Autism Speaks. Crain expects between 25-30 current and former players will participate in the event, which is open to the public.

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"Me and my wife had wanted to start a foundation for a long time with the platform that we'd give back to kids any way possible," Crain said. "We just want to be able to help kids in whatever capacity, whether through medical, hardships or whatever it may be."

Crain, who was at Camelback Ranch on Wednesday, said planning for the event began in October. Though he had wanted to begin a foundation during his playing career, Crain said after planning the event he knows he wouldn't have had the appropriate amount of time while he was an active player.

Among those scheduled to attend are Cody Ross, David Aardsma, Jonny Gomes, Nick Punto, JJ Putz, Brandon Webb, Justin Morneau, Matt Lindstrom, Scott Feldman, Nate Jones, Mark Melancon, Denard Span and Chad Qualls. Crain also hopes to convince a few more current White Sox players. He said reservations for the event or donations can be made through Crainfamilyfoundation.org.