This season's moves could top 2004's for White Sox

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This season's moves could top 2004's for White Sox

In the weeks leading up to this season's non-waiver trading deadline, Kenny Williams acquired Kevin Youkilis, Brett Myers and Francisco Liriano for two utility players and four expendable minor-league pitchers. In other words, he addressed three key needs on the White Sox without subtracting much of anything.

When Brent Lillibridge and Eduardo Escobar -- both of whom, it should be noted, we well-liked in the White Sox clubhouse -- are your two biggest losses at the deadline, that's pretty impressive.

In 2004, Williams made a pair of moves that wound up being important for the White Sox World Series run in 2005. Like in 2012, Williams didn't wind up giving up much, although it didn't look like it at the time.

Freddy Garcia and Ben Davis cost the White Sox Jeremy Reed, then a blue-chip outfield prospect, Miguel Olivo, an up-and-coming catcher with great defensive skills, and Michael Morse, a powerful Double-A infielder. At the time, it looked like Seattle had made out well in the deal -- Reed was ranked as Baseball America's preseason No. 25 prospect, while Baseball Prospectus had him at No. 2.

But after playing a full season in 2005, Reed was relegated to a backup role for most of his eight-year career, in which he's posted a .309 OBP at the major-league level. Olivo bounced around and has since landed back with Seattle, but he has a career OBP of just .275. And Morse never broke through with Seattle, but seven years after the trade hit 31 home runs for Washington.

Garcia went on to throw 228 innings with a 3.87 ERA for the 2005 White Sox and compiled 8.4 WAR in 2 12 years with the team. Reed, Olivo and Morse have combined to be worth 9.4 WAR in the eight years since the trade, mainly buoyed by Morse's fantastic 2011 season.

When the White Sox traded for Garcia on June 27, they sat one game back of Minnesota. With Garcia in tow, the Sox went through an up-and-down month and led the division as late as July 24. But on July 25, the wheels began to come off, and by July 31, when the Sox suffered an extra-inning loss to Detroit, they were five games out of first place.

Esteban Loaiza was struggling to tread water in 2004, a year after a brilliant season nearly garnered him the AL Cy Young. Jose Contreras, the most-hyped Cuban pitcher to come to the United States at the time, had a 5.64 ERA in 18 starts with the Yankees.

The White Sox and Yankees swapped struggling starters on July 31. The team was in a much different place than they were on June 27, and hoped newly-accredited Dr. Cooper could fix Contreras' woes.

That didn't happen in 2004, as Contreras limped to the finish with a 5.30 ERA for the White Sox. Loaiza was worse off in New York, though, and was blasted to the tune of an ERA over 8 after his move to the Yankees.

Contreras started off 2005 strong, posting a 3.30 ERA through the end of May. But by the end of July, Contreras' ERA had risen to 4.58. Luckily, the Sox weren't worse off, as they entered August with a seemingly-insurmountable lead in the AL Central.

But as the White Sox struggled and the Indians caught fire, it was Conteras who helped hold things together in the rotation. In his final 11 starts of the season, the White Sox went 10-1, which included three key victories in late September to help hold off Cleveland. When the playoffs began, Contreras anchored a rotation that put together an all-time great postseason performance.

The moves Williams made leading up to the 2004 deadline didn't help the White Sox immediately. It was a year later when they finally paid off in the form of banners, rings, and a massive parade.

In 2012, Williams' moves were designed to pay off immediately. Liriano is a free agent after the season, while Myers and Youkilis both have options for 2013. There exists the possibility that none of those three players return next season.

But if Youkilis, Myers and Liriano help push the White Sox deep into the playoffs this year, it won't matter. And Williams will have pulled off his most successful string of pre-deadline deals in eight years.

'It's possible, absolutely' that Carlos Rodon's next start could be with White Sox

'It's possible, absolutely' that Carlos Rodon's next start could be with White Sox

Help may be on the horizon for the White Sox starting rotation. 

Carlos Rodon, who threw 4 1/3 innings for the Charlotte Knights on Friday night, could make his next start for the big league club.

Before the Mark Buehrle Day ceremony on Saturday, Rick Renteria discussed whether the 24-year-old would need another start in Triple-A Charlotte as he rehabs from bursitis in his left shoulder. 

"I don't," Renteria said. "I think our plans are probably to get him back with us." 

Despite being tagged for seven earned runs Friday, Renteria was encouraged by Rodon's sharp off-speed pitches. He also extended for 91 pitches, but the Knights' defense struggled, stretching innings with two throwing errors.

"Actually, in talking to everybody, he threw pretty well," Renteria said. "Had a couple miscues in the field that were probably limited his outing. He felt good, pain-free, we’re very happy with that. According to the reports, the slider was working very well. He’s on track to come on back.”

His return could boost a rotation that has labored over the past month. In the last 30 games, the starters' ERA is a combined 5.63 with just six quality starts. They also set a franchise record for consecutive games without a quality start, tallying up 13 in a row. 

Renteria didn't level any specific expectations for Rodon, but stretching him out in Charlotte eases the transition. 

“I have to monitor everything he’s doing," Renteria said. "It’d be foolish for me to say I’m not going to be mindful of what he’s gone through. Obviously, we’re very happy that he’s healthy. He’s gotten up to I think 91 pitches yesterday, so we’re not concerned about his pitch count.”

In Triple-A Charlotte rehab starts, Rodon is 0-3 with a 9.22 ERA. He did whiff seven batters Friday, though, for a season high. 

As for Miguel Gonzalez, his timetable for a return is still up in the air, but he will throw a bullpen session Sunday or Monday, according to Renteria.

In the bullpen, Nate Jones got clearance to start throwing on Saturday. Infielder Tyler Saladino was also cleared, but Renteria said the team will "progress slowly" with him. 

 

 

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

On his 24th birthday, Tim Anderson’s present from home plate umpire Jim Wolf was his first major-league ejection.

In the fifth inning of the White Sox 3-0 loss to the Oakland Athletics, Anderson fouled off a pitch that landed in the opposing batter’s box. But A’s catcher Bruce Maxwell picked it up in what was ruled to be fair territory and threw the ball to first for the out.

Anderson pleaded his case saying the ball went foul. Wolf agreed, according to Anderson, which only further confused the White Sox shortstop.

“I told him that was BS,” Anderson said. “And he tossed me.”

Anderson said that he was surprised to be ejected so fast. So was manager Rick Renteria, who was thrown out moments after Anderson.

“I don’t want to get in trouble,” Renteria said. “The players having emotion, they are battling. I just think we need to grow a little thicker skin.”

Anderson said that he was appreciative of his manager coming to his defense.

“He kinda had a point and let me know he had my back,” Anderson said of Renteria. “Speaks a lot of him.”

A day after scoring nine runs on 18 hits, the White Sox failed to generate any offense on Friday. The team’s best chance came in the ninth inning.

But with runners at the corners and two outs, Matt Davidson put a good rip on the ball to center field, only to fly out at the warning track.

Anderson and Renteria were watching the game together in the clubhouse, and both believed the White Sox had tied the ballgame.

“We all jumped up and were excited but it kind of fell short,” Anderson said.