Chicago White Sox

Sox believe long-term payoff worth starting Stewart

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Sox believe long-term payoff worth starting Stewart

In the big picture, the White Sox may be better off because Zach Stewart started on Monday against the Cubs. The 25-year-old righty acquired from Toronto in last year's Edwin Jackson trade was given the start in the first game of the BP Crosstown Cup's second leg in an effort to give Chris Sale and Jake Peavy extra rest.

"We've basically had Peavy and Sale on a college schedule, pitching once every six days, once every seven days on occasion," general manager Kenny Williams explained prior to the game. "The reason why Stewart's pitching tonight, for instance, is so we can continue that and we're not taxing them."

Peavy and Sale have kept the White Sox rotation afloat for most of the season, with Jose Quintana and Gavin Floyd contributing spurts of success. Keeping the former pair fresh is a top priority, hence the decision to push both starters back.

But the short-term outcome of the decision came back to bite the Sox. Stewart gave up four homers in 5 23 innings as the White Sox lost 12-3 to the Cubs, although the Sox bullpen was responsible for half of those runs crossing the plate. The loss was the ninth the Sox have suffered in their last 13 games.

With winds gusting to 41 miles per hour during the game, Stewart had trouble keeping the ball in the park. That's been a problem for him all season, as he's allowed 10 home runs in 30 innings.

Stewart has made spot starts in the past, so he refused to use the short preparation time as a reason for his struggles.

"I've done it before. It's nothing that should have phased me too much or anything," Stewart said. "A few opportunities came about and I didn't make the pitch. They did what they were supposed to do with it."

Stewart was booed off the field, and plenty of fans took to twitter to not-so-subtly state their belief the righty should be shipped off to Triple-A. Ventura said after the game the Sox would take a look at their available pitchers tomorrow and discuss any potential roster moves then. But it may be worth noting Dylan Axelrod, who's posted a 3.18 ERA with Charlotte, made his last start June 14 and is fully rested.

One game of 162 is just a small blip on the White Sox 2012 radar. And while getting throttled by the team with the worst record in baseball certainly won't leave a good taste in anyone's mouth, it was much easier for Ventura and the Sox to stomach when looking long-term.

"That was the plan, anyway," Ventura said of getting Peavy and Sale more rest. "We weren't planning on John Danks not being able to make this start. But things happen as far as some guys being available, some guys aren't, you just gotta make it through.

"The goal is all the way through the year, keeping them as strong as they can be all the way through the year."

Forget about it: Yoan Moncada's ability to play through mistakes

Forget about it: Yoan Moncada's ability to play through mistakes

Yoan Moncada could have mentally taken himself out of Friday’s game in the third inning.

The White Sox prized prospect booted a routine groundball in the frame, contributing to a long, damaging Royals rally. A few singles, a Tim Anderson error and five runs later, it seemed as if the inning would never end on the South Side.

Mercifully, the Sox were finally able to return to their dugout because Moncada refocused and refused to allow one physical error to compound. 

The skilled second baseman ranged up the middle to scoop a hard-hit Brandon Moss grounder, preventing any further damage. One inning later, he pummeled a two-run blast to center to give the White Sox the lead for good.

It’s that type of short-term memory that has impressed the Sox in his first major league showing with the club.

"I don't think he consumes himself too much in the mistake,” Rick Renteria said after the 7-6 win. “Maybe he's just thinking about what he's trying to do the next time."

Moncada’s quite polished for a 22-year-old infielder who hasn’t even played a full season in the majors. His athletic ability allows him to make the highlight-reel plays frequently, so now it's about continuing to work on his fundamentals. 

“He's really improved significantly since he's gotten here,” Renteria said. “Not trying to be too flashy. The great plays that he makes just take care of themselves. He's got tremendous ability.” 

Since being called up, Moncada has added value to what is the arguably the best second base fielding team in the MLB. Although no defensive metric is perfect, between Moncada, Tyler Saladino and Yolmer Sanchez, the White Sox second basemen lead the league with 19 defensive runs saved above average. The Pirates have the next highest amount of runs saved by second basemen with 10, according to Baseball-Reference. 

With the enormous range, though, comes the inexperience. In just 46 games, Moncada has tallied eight errors. 

"It happens to the best of them," Renteria said. "He's one of the young men, along with (Anderson) and even (Jose Abreu), who are looking to improve a particular skill, which is defending."

It serves as a reminder that the likely infield of the future still has a ways to go. 

Geovany Soto details ‘total destruction’ of Puerto Rico after speaking with family

Geovany Soto details ‘total destruction’ of Puerto Rico after speaking with family

Geovany Soto’s family in Puerto Rico is safe after Hurricane Maria slammed into the island, leaving at least 24 people dead and virtually all residents without power.

The White Sox catcher said he spoke to his family Wednesday on the phone and they were in good spirits. Soto’s mom, dad and in-laws are in San Juan, Puerto Rico, while his wife and kids are with him in the U.S.

Soto said it’s “total destruction” on the island right now, and the best thing he can do to assist is sending necessary items.

“It’s really tough,” Soto said. “I talked to my parents and the toughest part is you have the money, you can buy batteries but there’s nothing left. So, the best thing I could probably do is kind of from over here is sending batteries, sending anything that I can think of that’s valuable for them right now.” 

Puerto Rico is still in emergency protocol as rescue efforts continue two days after the storm plowed onto land as a Category 4 hurricane. Just seeing the images was hard for Soto. 

"It was unbelievable," he said "You know it’s coming. It’s an island. It’s not like you can evacuate and go where? We don’t have a road that goes to Florida. It is what it is. We try to do the best that we can do with the preparation that they gave us. After you’ve done everything you just kind of brace yourself and keep good spirits and hope for the best."

Soto usually travels to Puerto Rico after the season, but because of the damage, he has yet to make a decision on when, or if, he'll go. 

The veteran catcher is the only Puerto Rican player on the Sox, but manager Rick Renteria's wife also has family on the island. 

"They're doing fine, thankfully," Renteria said. "I think that we expect to hear a little bit more in the next couple days."