Sox Drawer: Let it snow

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Sox Drawer: Let it snow

Thursday, March 31, 2011
Posted: 3:30 p.m. Updated: 4:56 p.m.

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Indians head groundskeeper Brandon Koehnke knew he had quite a mess on his hands when he arrived at Progressive Field this morning at 6:30 a.m.

Two inches of snow had fallen in Cleveland, and the field hes responsible for, which just had brand new grass installed this past winter, suddenly looked ready for Christmas Day, certainly not Opening Day.

The White Sox were supposed to hold a workout here. Instead, the session began with Juan Pierre, Mark Buehrle, Ramon Castro, and 3rd base coach Jeff Cox building a snowman.
Buehrle, who will extend his White Sox record by making his 9th Opening Day start, loves the Midwest. Hes just not sure why the White Sox always start each season playing in it.

It makes no sense, Buehrle said. Why start on the East coast or the Midwest where theres snow and its 30 degrees? Theres no reason not to be in Anaheim where its 80 degrees right now.

For the record, it was 84 degrees today in Anaheim. It will be 80 there tomorrow. Where are the Angels beginning the season? Kansas City. Buehrles right. It makes no sense.

As for being in Cleveland for Opening Day, Ozzie Guillen your thoughts?

Very stupid to play in Cleveland right now, Guillen said. Nothing against Cleveland. We expect that. When you play in Cleveland on Opening Day...a couple years ago they canceled like 30 games here. But were here, and have to play through snow.

Speaking of which:

Hey, you ever been hit by a snowball? Matt Thornton said to Chris Sale as he walked out of the dugout. Sale proceeded to get pelted by a 97-mile-per-hour fastball.

Sale, a Florida native, was definitely at a disadvantage, which might be the same for hitters on Friday, even if the temps rise into the 40s, which has been forecasted.

The hitters are going to be cold up there, Thornton said. I honestly think its an advantage for the pitcher because youre out there and feeling warm and pretty much in constant motion. Hitters dont like hitting in the cold either."

Maybe so, but how about posing for a picture in the cold in shorts and no shirt? Thats what 43-year-old Omar Vizquel did on the field for a Cleveland newspaper. The former Indian is set to begin his 23rd season in the major leagues. Friday will be a memorable day for Vizquel, assuming hes not in the hospital suffering from frostbite and pneumonia.

This one in particular is really special because my best years were here in Cleveland and how special everything went when we had those teams, Vizquel said. Its going to be really, really great. An emotional moment for me.

By the afternoon, the snow had been removed from the Progressive Field tarp. Groundskeepers were blow drying the outfield grass. Yes, blow drying.

Thats April baseball. The White Sox are used to it. And even though hed rather be starting the season somewhere much more tropical, Guillen doesnt want to hear any excuses.

A lot of players this time of year have to prepare mentally to play in cold weather. Thats no excuse, the White Sox manager said. You want to play in nice weather, sign with the NBA. You play indoors and youre fine.

Last year the White Sox opened in Chicago. This year Cleveland.

As Thornton said, It is what it is.

Next year? On to Detroit!!

I'll be sure to bring my snowsuit.

Chuck Garfien hosts White Sox Pregame and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet with former Sox sluggers Frank Thomas and Bill Melton. Follow Chuck @ChuckGarfien on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox news and views.

White Sox prospect Zack Collins takes a major step toward making it as a big-league catcher

White Sox prospect Zack Collins takes a major step toward making it as a big-league catcher

Single-A Winston-Salem's Zack Collins is experiencing some newfound confidence when it comes to the catch and throw.

He should.

After he made a minor technical adjustment this spring, the White Sox first-rounder has dramatically improved his results in throwing out base runners early this season. The catcher has consistently reduced his throw time to second base by a tenth of a second. After he only threw out three of 21 stolen-base attempts in 2016, Collins has nailed 10 of 14 would-be thieves early this season.

Collins' correction is due in large part to a small change he and White Sox catching coordinator John Orton made in how the catcher positions himself as he releases the ball.

"What we noticed was when he tried to be quick throwing, his ball would seem to kind of die," said. "We looked at some video compared to some other guys that throw well and he wasn't using his front side, he wasn't on his legs enough to where he could use his lower half. 

"We saw it, he made the adjustment the next day and he felt it right away. He's basically carried that into the season. He's throwing great right now. 

"It doesn't normally work that way."

It's more than just a repositioning that has helped Collins. The No. 10 overall pick of the 2016 draft changed his dietary habits in the offseason and dropped 15 pounds. Collins also did Pilates to improve his mobility behind the plate.

Those aspects along with a strong attention to detail and quiet presence behind the plate had the White Sox pleased with how Collins showed in big league camp this spring. Early in camp, Orton said it didn't matter if Collins ever grew into a standout thrower because there are so many other important aspects of catching. He listed receiving/blocking, game-calling/handling the staff and hitting ahead of throwing in terms of importance.

But then Collins added a wrinkle and made what could be a significant adjustment. Prior to making the change, Collins' glove and front shoulder were pointed toward shortstop when he released to second base on a stolen-base attempt. Orton changed Collins' positioning and now has him throwing directly at the base. Collins instantly could feel a difference and his throws have been on target more often.

"I kind of closed myself off to second base," Collins said. "I get a lot more behind my throws and a lot better accuracy. That's the biggest thing.

"It feels great. It kind of feels normal now. Before it was a little weird, like I was closing myself off too much. But it kind of feels normal now and I get a lot of pressure off my arm and obviously the throw percentage is there."

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More important, the drastically-reduced times are there. 

Prior to making the change, Collins' throws to second base were somewhere around 2.08 to 2.10 seconds. In the first week of the season, Collins had reduced the time to 1.97 seconds and registered a 1.92 on one throw. He even posted several 1.87s in between innings.

"If you're under 2 and accurate you'll get most guys for sure," Orton said.

Collins has eliminated many attempts in the early going. He's throwing with confidence, too.
 
Recently, late in a tied game, Collins threw out a man headed to second base with a runner on third for the final out of the inning.

Winston-Salem manager Willie Harris was stunned to learn that Collins had improved from throwing out 14 percent of all base runners last season to 71 percent so far.

"Hell no I wouldn't even believe that," Harris said. "He's made some serious adjustments behind the plate.

"Collins is definitely a pro. He's going to have a very long career at the major league level. He does a lot of things right. He runs the staff. He knows when to make mound visits. He picks runners off at first, third, second."

The confidence the University of Miami product feels has carried over to social media. After Collins threw out another runner on Sunday, the team's Twitter account made a plea to Carolina League opponents to #KeepRunningOnZack. Colorado Rockies farmhand Willie Abreu, a former teammate of Collins at Miami, chimed in to inform the catcher he'd run on him all day.

Collins fired back: "You'd run on the other Zack Collins. Not the new one."

"It definitely helps and kind of gives me a little confidence behind my back knowing that I've found something that has helped me catch and throw," Collins said. "Obviously last year the numbers really weren't there during my first pro season. At the same time, I was kind of tired last year and didn't have as much behind my arm as I do now. I feel a lot better now."

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