Chicago White Sox

Sox Drawer: The Ozzie Guillen Show

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Sox Drawer: The Ozzie Guillen Show

Tuesday, October 27th
When Emile Berliner invented the microphone in 1876, I imagine he had no idea the kind of words man would say one day into his little creation.

So it is with great excitement (for us), and extreme fear for others (the FCC, Fox executives) that Ozzie Guillen has been hired to be a pre- and postgame analyst for the World Series starting on Wednesday.

Youve heard about Must-See TV. Could this become Must-Bleep TV?

Ozzie has been known to say (and swear about) some crazy things as manager of the White Sox. In fact, there are times when his sentences contain more cuss words than clean words.

Its one of his many talents.

But honestly, unless former Sun-Times columnist Jay Mariotti sneaks onto the set and challenges him to a verbal duel, I dont see Guillen turning into Sam Kinison when the red light goes on, forcing censors to beep out the broadcast as if it was a test from the Emergency Broadcast System.

Still, Ozzie will be Ozzie. What will he do? What will he say? Who knows??

But if I know this White Sox manager, here are 10 things I am confident that Ozzie will not say during his World Series appearances:

10. Nick Swisher? I was totally wrong about that guy. The two of us should have been best friends, yoga partners, baseballs version of Laverne and Shirley. I miss him. Every. Single. Day.

9. Is it me or does C.C. Sabathia look a whole lot slimmer?

8. Sorry guys, I have to leave early tonight. I made plans to see the new Michael Jackson movie with Bartolo Colon.

7. I knew that Jimmy Rollins was going to lay down that squeeze bunt in the 9th, because we talked about it this morning on Facebook.

6. Speaking of Facebook, I cant believe Robinson Cano unfriended me! He says I update my status too often. I mean, I only do it like 15-20 times a day. Is there something wrong with that?

6. Dont stop belieeeeeevin!

5. Did you see Curb Your Enthusiasm last night? How about Mad Men?

4. Ozzie: I think Jerry Yang is one of the greatest bluffers of all-time. He always senses weakness. Hell raise and raise again even if hes only got a pair of threes. What a great competitor!

Chris Rose: Um, Ozzie. This isnt the World Series of Poker. This is the actual World Series.

Ozzie: @&!

3. I hate Wrigley Field. (actually, Ozzie might find a way to say this. He always does.)

2. Can we stop for a second and give a standing ovation for the umpires? What an incredible job they have done during the playoffs. They havent missed a THING.

1. Wheres Bill Melton?

By the numbers: Lucas Giolito showed impressive control in White Sox debut

By the numbers: Lucas Giolito showed impressive control in White Sox debut

Lucas Giolito didn't pick up a win in his White Sox debut, but there were plenty of encouraging signs. 

At the top of that list has to be his control, which was an issue that plagued the Sox No. 6 prospect in the past

Here's a closer look at his precision last night against the Twins: 

0 - Maybe the most important number of all. Giolito did not walk a single batter. 

- Giolito hit one Twin. It was Brian Dozier on the first at-bat of the game. First-game nerves? We'll chalk it up to that. 

64 - Giolito hurled 64 strikes out of 99 pitches, resulting in a strike percentage above league average

[MORE: Lucas Giolito's White Sox debut drew rave reviews

A fair number of those strikes the 23-year-old threw were hit hard, though. CSN's Dan Hayes noted the exit velocities against Giolito in the first inning: 

Although he got out of that inning unscathed, Minnesota did get to the right-hander: 

- The number of dingers slammed off Giolitio. 

The exit velocities on those, according to MLB Exit Velocity

98.9 - Jorge Polanco's fourth inning homer.

105.5 - Kennys Vargas' fifth inning homer.

104.3 - Eddie Rosario's sixth inning homer. 

All of the homers hit were on fastballs, which was his go-to pitch according to Hayes. Here's a look at his pitch selection: 

69 - Fastballs

16 - Changeups

12 - Curveballs

The bottom line: 

4 - Earned runs Giolito gave up. 

Lucas Giolito's White Sox debut drew rave reviews

Lucas Giolito's White Sox debut drew rave reviews

Lucas Giolito’s first outing may not have netted the outcome the White Sox hoped for, but the look and feel was most definitely there.

The team’s sixth-ranked prospect showed just how much progress he’s made the over the entire season and in particular the last six weeks in his White Sox debut on Tuesday night.

Giolito was promoted from Triple-A Charlotte early Tuesday and looked poised and confident for six innings despite a heavy reliance on the fastball because his curve wasn’t where he wanted. While he yielded three home runs in a 4-1 loss to the Minnesota Twins, Giolito and the White Sox liked what they saw.

“Excellent,” manager Rick Renteria said. “I thought it was a very positive outing.

“Lucas I thought threw the ball very, very well. Fastball was very good. He was using his breaking ball. He threw some that were a little short. But all and all, I thought his mound presence, his attack of the strike zone -- I don’t think he walked anybody, he threw a lot of strikes -- he looked very, very good to me. Very pleased.”

Once the top pitching prospect in baseball, Giolito had lost a little bit of the shine even by the time he was traded to the White Sox last December in the Adam Eaton deal. He struggled at times during a nomadic 2016 campaign with the Nationals -- he was moved seven times in all -- and saw a dip in fastball velocity as his mechanics got out of whack.

Though excited by the trade to the White Sox, Giolito admitted in spring training he wasn’t quite where he yet wanted to be. He struggled early this season at Triple-A Charlotte, posting a 5.40 ERA in his first 16 starts and often failed to pitch deep into games.

But along the way Giolito found his confidence, rediscovered his curveball and began to pitch more consistently. That was the pitcher the White Sox saw on Tuesday night, the one who despite not having his entire arsenal didn’t panic.

Working almost entirely with his fastball -- 69 of his 99 pitchers were four-seamers -- Giolito pitched at a quick pace and got into a rhythm. Giolito got 10 swings and misses, including eight with the fastball, and didn’t walk anyone.

“I felt relaxed,” Giolito said. “I felt confident the whole time.

“I feel like tonight I was able to control the game a lot better. Last year my time in the big leagues the game would speed up on me a lot. I’d walk a guy, give up a couple of base hits and start to kind of get out of control. Tonight, I felt under control, I was able to trust my stuff, it was just those mistakes.”

Giolito’s outing wasn’t perfect. He tried to go inside with fastballs three times and left them over the middle. Jorge Polanco blasted a game-tying solo homer off Giolito in the fourth, Kennys Vargas hit one off him in the fifth and Eddie Rosario hit a two-run, opposite-field shot in the sixth.

[MORE: White Sox may have discovered 'diamond in the rough' in Juan Minaya

But that he was effective enough to keep the White Sox in the game in spite of his offense, which blew bases-loaded opportunities in the second and third innings, and minus all of his pitches wasn’t lost on Omar Narvaez. Narvaez liked how Giolito competed and the way he spotted his fastball in and out, up and down.

“I think he’s going to be one of our best pitchers,” Narvaez said. “His fastball is kind of sneaky and he has a great changeup. He uses it whenever he wants to and he has a really, really good curveball.

“He made a lot of good pitches (with the fastball). Every time we worked behind he just came back with the fastball.”

Giolito threw his curveball 12 times and used the changeup 16. While he induced a few groundballs with his curve, Giolito wasn’t as effective in two-strike situations, spiking the pitch in front of the plate. Even so, Giolito felt good about what he accomplished and that’s great for the White Sox.

“I feel like I belong,” Giolito said. “I feel like my stuff plays. I’m happy I didn’t walk anyone tonight. I was able to command the fastball pretty well, but fastball-changeup was pretty much all I had. I wasn’t throwing the curveball as well as I would have liked, but I’m going to work on that for the next start and hopefully be able to command that pitch a little better.”