Sox Drawer: Please stop now boys!


Sox Drawer: Please stop now boys!

Tuesday, Sept. 7, 2010
4:36 PM

By Chuck Garfien

We interrupt this pennant race to bring you the following announcement:

The Minnesota Twins will eventually lose a baseball game. We dont know how, we dont know where, we dont know when, but at some point (hopefully in the near future) that thing known as a defeat will rear its ugly head and hit the Twins right between the eyes.We hope.

Yes, the White Sox number-one menace is at it again, doing its best to make life miserable for the South Siders. It just might be the Twins greatest strength. Hopefully it wont become the Sox greatest weakness.

After finishing one of their best weeks on the road in years, seven straight wins, most of them ranging from dramatic to improbable, closing the stretch by beating Clay Buchholz, John Lackey, Jonathan Papelbon, and Jose Valverde, the Sox looked up at the standings and noticed how much ground they had gained on Minnesota.

One measly game.

While the Sox were exhausting every ounce of their bodies and minds, scoring 24 runs after the 6th inning to keep their playoffs hopes alive, the Twins just went out and took six of seven from the Tigers and first-place Rangers, five of their wins decided by a single run, and one by a trigger-happy 3rd base umpire who called the Rangers Michael Young out for interference with two outs in the top of the 9th inning, ending a furious Texas rally.

But whos complaining? Me, I guess.

If the team Ozzie Guillen famously called the piranhas happen to be getting in the White Sox heads, the Twins are doing everything in their power to keep the Sox out of theirs.

Sunday while the Sox were mounting their late-inning comeback in Boston, someone operating the Target Field scoreboard decided to show highlights of the rally on the Jumbotron.

Twins manager Ron Gardenhire didnt like it one bit.

Scoreboard watching is one thing; having White Sox highlights during our game is a joke, Gardenhire told reporters. It brought everybody down. The crowd got deflated. We dont need that. This is our game. We dont care what the White Sox do until we play them. Theyve never done that, and I hope they never do it again.

And to be sure, Gardenhire spoke to the Twins front office about it. Monday, they showed highlights of the CardinalsBrewers game instead.

One week from tonight scoreboard watching wont be necessary. The White Sox and Twins will be sharing the same field for three games at U.S. Cellular Field, easily the biggest series of the season.

Will the Twins cool off by then? Anythings possible. But judging by history, not probable. Guillen knows it.

Its nice when the Twins lose, but the way things are going for themI expect to be close enough when we face them, said the White Sox manager. I dont expect anybody to go out there and do us a favor. In the meanwhile, we wish theyd lose. But we just have to continue to play the way we are and take it for the best.

White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs


White Sox Talk Podcast: National media fails to recognize White Sox as 2005 champs

Chuck Garfien, Slavko Bekovic and Chris Kamka react to the national media blunders that failed to recognize the White Sox as 2005 World Series champions. 

Later, the guys discuss Jerry Reinsdorf's comments about cheering for the Cubs and break down what it takes to beat the Indians. 

Check out the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast below: 

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

White Sox: Chris Getz's new player development role is to carry out 'vision of the scouts'

He may be limited on experience, but Chris Getz already has a strong idea about player development.

Getz -- who on Friday was named the White Sox director of player development -- worked the past two seasons as an assistant to baseball operations in player development for the Kansas City Royals. A fourth-round pick of the White Sox in the 2005 amateur draft, Getz replaces Nick Capra, who earlier this month was named the team’s third-base coach. A quick learner whom a baseball source said the Royals hoped to retain, Getz described his new position as being “very task oriented.”

“(The job) is carrying out the vision of the scouts,” Getz said. “The players identified by the scouts and then they are brought in and it’s a commitment by both the player and staff members to create an environment for that player to reach their ceiling.

“It’s a daily process.”

Getz, a University of Michigan product, played for the White Sox in 2008 and 2009 before he was traded to the Royals in a package for Mark Teahen in 2010. Previously drafted by the White Sox in 2002, he described the organization as “something that always will be in my DNA.”

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]​

Getz stayed in Kansas City through 2013 and began to consider a front-office career as his playing career wound down. His final season in the majors was with the Toronto Blue Jays in 2014.

Royals general manager Dayton Moore hired Getz as an assistant to baseball operations in January 2015 and he quickly developed a reputation as both highly intelligent and likeable, according to a club source.

“He is extremely well-regarded throughout the game, and we believe he is going to have a positive impact on the quality of play from rookie ball through Chicago,” GM Rick Hahn said.

Getz had as many as four assistant GMs ahead of him with the Royals, who couldn’t offer the same kind of position as the White Sox did. Getz spent the past week meeting with other members of the White Sox player development staff and soon will head to the team’s Dominican Republic academy. After that he’ll head to the Arizona Fall League as he becomes familiar with the department. Though he’s still relatively new, Getz knows what’s expected of his position.

“It’s focused on what’s in front of you,” Getz said. “Player development people are trying to get the player better every single day.”

“With that being said, the staff members need to be creative in their thinking. They need to be innovative at times. They need to know when to press the gas or pump the brakes. They need to be versatile in all these different areas.”