Sox Drawer: Sox best in giving Twins their worst

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Sox Drawer: Sox best in giving Twins their worst

Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2010
12:26 PM

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com

Frank Thomas was driving into the city before the game on Tuesday when he suddenly heard a booming sound coming from his luxury automobile, stopping his car dead in its tracks off the Kennedy Expressway.

Little did Frank know that he was living the perfect metaphor of the Minnesota Twins, a team notorious for putting sugar in the Sox gas tank, taking the nuts off their wheels, the air out of their tires, stalling their playoff hopes with the delicate touch of a jack-hammer.

Frank would need a tow truck. The White Sox need something more, like a brand new car, one that can drive around (or over) the likes of Mauer, Kubel, Liriano, and even mans best friend, Jim Thome, who when I told him before Tuesdays game to take it easy on his former team, he laughed and replied, But this has been good for me.

Yeah, we know.

Tuesdays crushing 9-3 defeat makes the White Sox 5-and-11 against the Twins this season. When the season is over, and youre looking for a reason why your team didnt win the division, look no further than that.

The Twins seem to get up for the White Sox every time, Thomas said last night on a spirited U.S. Cellular White Sox Postgame Live. Were their biggest rival. They come to play us like its the World Series every time.

The rivalry officially took shape in 2004 when Torii Hunter famously barreled into Sox catcher Jamie Burke at home plate. Bill Melton has done about 600 White Sox postgame shows since then, and there is nothing on the planet that irks the former South Side slugger more than the pesky Twins.

Maybe because theres nothing Bill can do about it. But the Sox sure can.

Playing the Minnesota Twins is tough, and youll never turn it around until you start to beat them like they beat you, said Melton, who explained that you need to play better defense, with fewer errors, less walks, and make their hitters feel like they are being squeezed in a 7-foot vise whenever they come to the plate.

Thats not happening. Instead, its the White Sox who are feeling the pressure, as well as the pain. Theyve been hit eight times by Minnesota pitchers this season, while the Sox have only hit the Twins three times. In fact, no team in the American League has gotten hit more (71), and no team has hit batters less (30) than the White Sox.

Theres something wrong there. And when the Twins see that, they find a way to make it a right, which annoys Melton to no end.

You look at their averages, you go Well, theyre good, Melton said. But why is this guy not hitting .320? They hit .350 off of us. A lot of it is they just feel relaxed at the plate. They feel good. Theres no pressure on them. You know why? Because they know the White Sox will throw it away.

Manny Ramirez is one of the most clutch hitters in baseball history.
But give him a White Sox uniform, send him to the plate against the Twins, and watch him fold under pressure. Tuesday, Ramirez struck out three times and left six men on base.

Thomas, a former first baseman who became a DH, has one theory:

This is the first time he has ever been a designated hitter full-time. Going down the stretch hes used to playing left field. That has a lot to do with timing also. Its really tough. For the first time, hes not out in left field relaxing, goofing off in the outfield and not thinking about hitting as much.

Manny has to be Manny.

That could have something to do with him, not swinging the bat as well, Thomas said.

Melton has another idea. It might have something to do with the drinking water inside the Sox clubhouse, or more likely, inside the Sox noggins.

The Twins beat the White Sox every year. That becomes a mental thing after a while. I dont care how many times you change your lineups and your players, thats something you always take with you on the field. You wish you could forget it, but you cant.

Nor can Bill, who when I asked him what it will take for the Sox to win the division replied:

It would be a miracle. Its not so much the White Sox, its about the Twins. They just dont lose.

Hes right. One of these days the Sox need to make that a wrong.

Chuck Garfien hosts White Sox Pregame and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet with former Sox sluggers Frank Thomas and Bill Melton. Follow Chuck @ChuckGarfien on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox news and views.

White Sox trio lands on MLB.com's Top 10 RHP prospects list

White Sox trio lands on MLB.com's Top 10 RHP prospects list

The White Sox farm system has taken a complete 180 over the past calendar year.

Gone are the days where the White Sox would be lucky to land a single prospect in Top 100 prospects lists.

After undergoing an overhaul that saw franchise cornerstones Chris Sale and Adam Eaton shipped out for a bundle of prospects, the White Sox are soaring up MLB farm system rankings.

As they will each day until the end of the January, MLBPipeline will release baseball's Top 10 prospects at each position.

To kick off the countdown, the Top 10 right-handed pitching prospects were released on Tuesday, and to no surprise the list is White Sox heavy.

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Lucas Giolito (No. 3) and Reynaldo Lopez (No. 10), sent to the White Sox from the Nationals in a blockbuster deal for Eaton, both cracked the Top 10 list. 

Michael Kopech, who was a key piece along with MLB.com's 2016 top overall prospect Yoan Moncada in the White Sox haul from the Boston Red Sox for Sale, came in at No. 4 on MLBPipeline's rankings.

Check out what MLB.com's Mike Rosenbaum had to say about each White Sox pitcher below:

3. Lucas Giolito, White Sox
The prized right-hander of last year's class, Giolito saw his stock wane over the course of the season and especially in the big leagues, where apparent mechanical issues resulted in diminished velocity and hindered his control. He's shown the ceiling of an ace in the past, with the ability to command a mid-to-upper 90s heater, a knee-buckling curveball and a fading changeup, and now has renowned pitching coach Don Cooper on his side after joining the White Sox as part of the offseason Adam Eaton blockbuster deal.

4. Michael Kopech, White Sox
Kopech began the year on the disabled list with a broken hand but made up for the time lost with dazzling performances in the Class A Advanced Carolina League and, later, in the Arizona Fall League. Acquired in the Chris Sale trade in December, the 20-year-old hits triple digits with ease and backs it up with a plus slider and a promising changeup. As he continues to make developmental strides, Kopech will move quickly in 2017.

10. Reynaldo Lopez, White Sox
Overshadowed by Giolito headed into last season, Lopez proved the more effective of the duo in the big leagues before joining him in the offseason trade to Chicago. A more consistent and linear delivery resulted in improved strike-throwing ability for the 23-year-old righty, who can miss bats with his well above-average fastball, excellent curve and improved changeup.

Ironically, Pittsburgh Pirates pitcher Tyler Glasnow and Houston Astros pitcher Francis Martes, two players who have been rumored to be involved in their respective team's talks with the White Sox for starter Jose Quintana, made the Top 10 list on Tuesday.

Heading into the 2016 season, shortstop Tim Anderson (No. 38) and pitcher Carson Fulmer (No. 42) were the only two White Sox prospects on MLBPipeline's Top 100 list.

At the very least the White Sox will double that number in 2017 with the three aforementioned pitchers and Moncada.

White Sox avoid arbitration with Todd Frazier, four pitchers

White Sox avoid arbitration with Todd Frazier, four pitchers

The White Sox agreed to one-year contracts with five players on Friday, including a $12-million deal for Todd Frazier.

Frazier established a franchise record for home runs by a third baseman in 2016 when he blasted 40 in his first season with the White Sox. A free agent after the 2017 season, Frazier hit .225/.302/.464 in 666 plate appearances, drove in a career high 98 runs and produced 2.4 Wins Above Replacement, according to fangraphs.com. 

Starting pitcher Miguel Gonzalez is set to earn $5.9 million this season. The team also agreed to deals with relievers Dan Jennings ($1.4 million), Zach Putnam ($1.1175 million) and Jake Petricka ($825,000).

The White Sox acquired Frazier in a three-player trade from the Cincinnati Reds in December 2015. It's expected they would try to trade Frazier, who has hit 104 homers since 2014 and participated in the All-Star Game Home Run Derby three consecutive years, before the Aug 1 non-waiver trade deadline as part of the club's rebuilding efforts. 

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Gonzalez went 5-8 with a 3.73 ERA in 24 games (23 starts) after he was signed to a minor-league deal in early April. 

Jennings posted a 2.08 ERA in 60 2/3 innings. 

Putnam had a 2.30 ERA in 27 1/3 innings with 30 strikeouts before he had surgery to remove bone chips from his right elbow. 

Petricka was limited to nine appearances before his season was ended by hip surgery.

Both Petricka and Putnam are expected to be ready for spring training.