Chicago White Sox

Sox Drawer: For starters, Peavy will... Sale won't

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Sox Drawer: For starters, Peavy will... Sale won't

Thursday, Feb. 17, 2011
Posted 9:05 p.m.

By Chuck Garfien
CSNChicago.com

Glendale, Ariz. - When Jake Peavy arrived for his physical Thursday at Camelback Ranch a towering figure hovered a few feet away, anxiously hoping the doctors wouldnt find any snags in the comeback of his 55 million dollar pitcher.

Fortunately for White Sox GM Kenny Williams, Peavy received a clean bill of health, and Day One of White Sox spring training was underway.

Peavy went to his locker and spoke to the media about patience, a word that had never existed in the mans vocabulary until reality struck his body like a lightning bolt last July when the former Cy Young winner tore the lat muscle in the back of his shoulder - a clean rip off the bone.

His season over. His career? Still to be determined.

And yet there was Peavy taking the mound, throwing 40 pitches to catcher A.J. Pierzynski, a session Peavy described as free and easy, and added, Were going ahead and feel like Im one of the guys.

Good sign. And then came another.

WATCH: Thornton wants to close

Chris Sale is going to be in the bullpen. That was Williams, around five minutes into his media session, announcing that Sale (the perceived Peavy insurance policy), would not be needed in the rotation after all.

Why the quick and sudden turnaround? Heres one reason:

I wanted three lefties (in the bullpen) because there are a few players in the division that get on my nerves, and Im tired of watching them run around the bases, Williams said.

Oh, you mean Joe Mauer, Justin Morneau, and Shin-Soo Choo? Got it.

And heres the other reason: The Sox are quietly and cautiously optimistic that Peavy will be able to return sooner rather than later. Williams even mentioned the possibility of Peavy taking the mound when his first start comes up April 10th... if things went his way.

But considering the severity of the injury and the Sox priority to be very cautious with him, Peavy will more than likely miss the first month of the season (2 or 3 starts), and hopefully be ready by May.

It's our job to make sure that competitive nature doesn't get the best of him, and get him to point where he's doing something more premature than he should," Williams said. "We will watch him closely and be very cautious dealing with him as I explained to him today. Whenever he gets out there we want him at 100 percent. We don't want him to start at 80 percent and then stay at 80 percent because he hasn't given himself that extra three weeks or a month."

Williams cautioned that there could be some blips along the way in Peavys recovery.

"That's obviously not what you want to hear, but I'm going to listen to my body, Peavy said. At the same time, I'm going to push it as hard as I can push it to get back out there. But at the same time, I have to be honest with myself and the staff. I'm excited. I really don't think I'm going to be that far behind."

For a competitor like Peavy, talking over and over again about injuries and not victories has burned the fire inside him even more. But it's also changed his perspective about his baseball career.

"The last few years have been tough for me," Peavy admitted. "To be healthy for eight years in your career and never miss any significant time, and then be traded and miss all the time that I've missed here, it's been frustrating. But at the same time, I have a greater appreciation to be here, to play the game and be healthy when you are healthy."

So White Sox fans, keep your fingers crossed, and believe in the power of healing.

"I have a lot of motivation to get back out there and play, and be who I can be."

He's not close. But closer.

Chuck Garfien hosts White Sox Pregame and Postgame Live on Comcast SportsNet with former Sox sluggers Frank Thomas and Bill Melton. Follow Chuck @ChuckGarfien on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox news and views.

Tim Anderson wanted chance to lift White Sox to victory

Tim Anderson wanted chance to lift White Sox to victory

Tim Anderson has dealt with so many teachable moments this season that an enjoyable one was long overdue.

It arrived in the form of several freezing cold Gatorade showers late Wednesday night following the first walkoff hit of the White Sox shortstop’s career. Grinding through the final six weeks of a sophomore slump, Anderson shook off three hitless at-bats to single in the game-winning run and set off a raucous celebration as the White Sox topped the Minnesota Twins 4-3 at Guaranteed Rate Field.

Anderson’s game-winner off Twins reliever Trevor Hildenberger was set up an inning earlier when rookie Yoan Moncada doubled in the tying run while batting right-handed against Taylor Rogers.

“I think it’s a big lift,” Renteria said. “We were talking about how they were trying to be able to do something with the secondary pitches. Obviously, they did both. Obviously, it’s a confidence builder, both of them getting big hits, one to tie and one to go ahead. We were sitting in there today in the last at-bat going, ‘Man, we really want this for Timmy right here.’ Big situation, see how he does and fortunately he was able to get it through the infield.”

Renteria and the coaching staff weren’t the only ones who wanted to see how Anderson would fare in the moment. The second-year player had a sense from the dugout how it all would play out after Avisail Garcia led off the inning with a single to right field. Renteria had Kevan Smith bunt Garcia into scoring position, which led to an intentional walk of Yolmer Sanchez. Sanchez’s free pass brought up Anderson, who had one hit in his last 20 at-bats, including a bases-loaded strikeout in Tuesday’s loss.

“I wanted that moment,” Anderson said.

Before the game, Anderson had a lengthy conversation in the tunnel between the clubhouse and the dugout with hitting coach Todd Steverson. Anderson said much of the discussion surrounded his season and the ways he could benefit from everything he has endured.

Anderson struggled early this season and then battled some more as he dealt with the sudden death of close friend Branden Moss, who was killed in May while trying to help an assault victim. With the help of a counselor, Anderson began to rebound in August, posting a .976 OPS in the first 16 games of the month.

He followed that with another downturn that carried into Wednesday’s game.

“We really were just figuring out who I am and kind of learning from this year,” Anderson said of his discussion with Steverson. “Talking overall about everything that has been going on this year and kind of how I’m maturing as a hitter, just to really get better.”

Anderson shook off three hitless at-bats when he stepped up in the ninth. He had struck out on three pitches in the third inning before, grounded out in the fifth and popped out on the first pitch he saw with the tying run aboard in the seventh.

But Anderson made sure none of that mattered in the ninth.

After he took a first-pitch changeup for a ball, Anderson ripped Hildenberger’s next offering, which caught too much of the plate, into the hole. Running all the way, Garcia raced home and scored when Eddie Rosario’s throw went offline. White Sox players then chased down Anderson and Jose Abreu dropped a full bucket of Gatorade on Anderson’s head with the help of Sanchez, who held him in place.

“I put the first three at-bats behind me and came up big,” Anderson said. “It was an exciting moment. I’m going to enjoy it and wear it until tomorrow.”

Ditto for Moncada, who produced only his second extra-base hit from the right side all season long. While Moncada entered the contest with an .886 OPS against right-handed pitching, he had just a .327 OPS against southpaws. But Moncada took advantage of Leury Garcia’s one-out double even after he fell behind in the count 0-2. Moncada worked the count even, fouled off a fastball and then ripped a curve from Rogers inside the third-base line to tie the game.

“I like the pressure,” Moncada said through an interpreter. “I like being in some at-bats with the game on the line, because that’s something that you can change the course of the game. I like to be that guy, and I like to be the guy to help to win games. I like to get those chances.”

WATCH: Tim Anderson records first career walk-off hit in White Sox win over Twins

WATCH: Tim Anderson records first career walk-off hit in White Sox win over Twins

Wednesday night featured another edition of #RICKYSBOYSDONTQUIT, and a rally unicorn!

Tim Anderson completed the White Sox comeback by recording his first career walk-off hit — a single — in a 4-3 win over the Minnesota Twins at Guaranteed Rate Field.

With the White Sox trailing 3-2 in the eighth inning, Yoan Moncada tied the game with an RBI double.

In the ninth, Avisail Garcia opened the inning with a single. Kevan Smith's sac bunt moved Garcia to second and Yolmer Sanchez was intentionally walked. 

With two on and one out, Anderson hit a grounder past the shortstop and the 26-year-old All-Star got on his high horse to come around and score, securing the White Sox 49th win of the season.

The comeback actually started with the presence of a rally unicorn, when the South Siders were down 3-2 in the eighth.

Hands down, the rally unicorn beats any rally animal.

And get that girl some season tickets, White Sox.