Chicago White Sox

SoxFest notes: Konerko supports MLB's new HGH testing

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SoxFest notes: Konerko supports MLB's new HGH testing

Paul Konerko said hes in favor of Major League Baseballs new policy, in which players will be tested for HGH. Earlier this month, MLB implemented a policy which requires players to available for in-season testing after the plan was approved by the players union.

MLB officials have indicated players will be randomly selected for HGH tests at least once every season, but not during the postseason, according to media reports.

This is just about the right progression, Konerko said at SoxFest on Friday. As soon as there was testing there was going to be testing as soon as the science was up to doing it. This should be the way to test because now that the science is there, you can test guys from all angles and test for everything you want to test for.

The only issue Konerko can foresee is how some players react to blood tests. Players previously submitted blood tests in spring training last season.

I dont have a problem having blood drawn, Konerko said. I can see that might be the issue for some guys. Some guys, if they get blood drawn in the afternoon, they are done for the day. They are a mess. As for me I have never had a problem giving blood. The issue about how it is done will have to be figured out.

-- Dan Hayes

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Peavy: Detroit's the team to beat

White Sox starter Jake Peavy is confident in his team's chances of unseating Detroit atop the AL Central, but he's not going to make any bombastic statements about his squad in relation to the Tigers.

"I'm not going to say the White Sox are the team to beat because we're not," Peavy said. "The Tigers are the team to beat. They're the AL Central champions, they're the American League champions. They're the team to beat."

Detroit will return the core of its 2012 team along with catcher Victor Martinez, who missed all of last season following an ACL injury in the offseason. Until Peavy's White Sox are able to unseat the Tigers, the right-hander feels his team has plenty to prove.

"Are we sitting here that we're conceding? Absolutely not," Peavy said. "This team won't concede anything until we're mathematically eliminated. And we all believe right now that that's not going to happen. We know that we have enough talent, as we did last year, to play with the Detroit Tigers, who were the American League champions. There's not a player in this room who was on this team last year who doesn't believe we can beat that team."

- JJ Stankevitz

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No WBC for Santiago

Pitcher Hector Santiago confirmed Sunday he wont to play in the World Baseball Classic in March. Santiago (Puerto Rico) was one of five White Sox players listed on provisional WBC rosters. Jesse Crain (Canada) and Alex Rios (Puerto Rico) are expected to participate as are minor-leaguers Andre Rienzo (Brazil) and Andy Gonzales (Puerto Rico).

-- Dan Hayes

Mitchell primed to turn the corner?

Jared Mitchell hit .237.358.420 between Double-A Birmingham and Triple-A Charlotte last season, which represented a step in the right direction for the team's 2009 first-round draft pick. His trikeout total was still high -- 179 in 549 plate appearances -- but White Sox assistant GM Buddy Bell feels the 24-year-old is starting to put everything together.

"I saw a guy who's starting to look like a baseball player," Bell, who's raved about Mitchell since seeing him play in the Instructional League last fall, said. "(He's) a guy who looks like a baseball player that's athletic as opposed to an athlete trying to play baseball."

-- JJ Stankevitz

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Reed working to avoid another slow finish

Addison Reed's offseason has consisted of plenty of cardio in an effort to avoid another late-season letdown.

As a rookie, Reed allowed 13 hits, two walks and eight runs in nine September innings. The right-hander said he didn't feel tired -- his fastball velocity in September was consistent with the rest of his season -- but the issue may have bee a little more latent.

"It might have been a combination of the hitters seeing me a couple times around," Reed said. " Physically, I didn't feel tired, but that didn't mean I didn't get tired."

-- JJ Stankevitz

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Oh those fans

Pitcher John Danks elicited plenty of laughs in a Sunday afternoon seminar when he was asked about his habits when he watches University of Texas sporting events.

I become one of the fans I hate, Danks said.

-- Dan Hayes

Avisail Garcia's 'big head' isn't getting in the way of defensive improvements

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USA TODAY

Avisail Garcia's 'big head' isn't getting in the way of defensive improvements

Avisail Garcia's "big head" almost cost the White Sox on Friday night. At least, that's Reynaldo Lopez's humorous theory. 

With the game on the line and the Royals' tying run dashing for the plate, Garcia slipped a bit before making a clutch recovery to nail Whit Merrifield. The craziness continued after the tag as Narvaez caught Lorenzo Cain drifting off first base to seal a win. 

"I was watching the game on the TV here," Lopez said, "and then when I saw the hit from Cain, and I saw that Avi fell down because he has a big head, I was concerned but at the same time I saw that his throw, he has a good arm and he made a very good throw." 

Just your average 9-2-4-6 double play to end a game on the South Side, right? 

"Obviously, when he slipped we took a little gasp," Renteria said. "But we were talking about his body control to be able to maintain himself enough to get up and make the throw that he did. Unbelievable. It's pretty exciting finish to a ballgame that kind of got a little ugly early on."

Ugly is an apt way to describe the first few innings. Tim Anderson and Yoan Moncada both made errors in the Royals' six-run third inning, and Lopez capped it off with a wild pitch that allowed Eric Hosmer to score. But it went from an eyesore loss to an overzealous "we could make noise in 2019" rebuild win from there, and Garcia's defense -- of all things -- played a significant role. 

Garcia's outfield assist in the ninth was his second of the game. The first, an absolute strike to cut down Alex Gordon in the sixth, didn't involve a slip, though. 

And while much has been made of Garcia's breakout year with the bat, he believes his defense is hugely improved, too. 

"I think 100 percent," he said. "I just try to get better every day with hitting and defense. That’s baseball so get better in everything."

He has 12 outfield assists on the season, up from five a year ago. And despite his overall fielding percentage being down, his strong arm may give him a stronger defensive reputation. 

"Since last year, he's always had an excellent arm," Renteria said. "I think his accuracy is something to be pointed out too because as off balance as he was, he's made some throws to the plate that have been really spot on."

Renteria attributes Garcia's accuracy to the outfielder putting in extra time with Daryl Boston. 

"(Boston) has those guys throwing, and none of you guys are out there watching them work, but they'll throw quite a bit to the bases, especially second base," Renteria said. "They'll get deep and they'll work on doing that, so that's just a part of their routine."

The evolution of Avi carries on. 

Forget about it: Yoan Moncada's ability to play through mistakes

Forget about it: Yoan Moncada's ability to play through mistakes

Yoan Moncada could have mentally taken himself out of Friday’s game in the third inning.

The White Sox prized prospect booted a routine groundball in the frame, contributing to a long, damaging Royals rally. A few singles, a Tim Anderson error and five runs later, it seemed as if the inning would never end on the South Side.

Mercifully, the Sox were finally able to return to their dugout because Moncada refocused and refused to allow one physical error to compound. 

The skilled second baseman ranged up the middle to scoop a hard-hit Brandon Moss grounder, preventing any further damage. One inning later, he pummeled a two-run blast to center to give the White Sox the lead for good.

It’s that type of short-term memory that has impressed the Sox in his first major league showing with the club.

"I don't think he consumes himself too much in the mistake,” Rick Renteria said after the 7-6 win. “Maybe he's just thinking about what he's trying to do the next time."

Moncada’s quite polished for a 22-year-old infielder who hasn’t even played a full season in the majors. His athletic ability allows him to make the highlight-reel plays frequently, so now it's about continuing to work on his fundamentals. 

“He's really improved significantly since he's gotten here,” Renteria said. “Not trying to be too flashy. The great plays that he makes just take care of themselves. He's got tremendous ability.” 

Since being called up, Moncada has added value to what is the arguably the best second base fielding team in the MLB. Although no defensive metric is perfect, between Moncada, Tyler Saladino and Yolmer Sanchez, the White Sox second basemen lead the league with 19 defensive runs saved above average. The Pirates have the next highest amount of runs saved by second basemen with 10, according to Baseball-Reference. 

With the enormous range, though, comes the inexperience. In just 46 games, Moncada has tallied eight errors. 

"It happens to the best of them," Renteria said. "He's one of the young men, along with (Anderson) and even (Jose Abreu), who are looking to improve a particular skill, which is defending."

It serves as a reminder that the likely infield of the future still has a ways to go.