Stone's Mailbag: Big Z and Sox pursuit of Dunn

Stone's Mailbag: Big Z and Sox pursuit of Dunn

Thursday, July 8, 2010
3:48 PM

Steve Stone dives into his mailbag to answer some of your questions about the White Sox being buyers, Andrew Cashner starting, what to do with Carlos Zambrano, and more!

Question from JJ S.--Oak Park, IL: J.J. Putz has undergone an interesting transformation, throwing his fastball significantly less and his splitter significantly more this year than he did in his heyday with Seattle. And yet, he's had about as good of success as he did in his dominant 2006-2007 seasons. Steve, did you or anybody you played with ever undergo such a drastic change in his pitch selection, and did you or he ever do it with as much success at Putz has had?

Steve Stone: Well before we anoint him as the next Mariano Rivera, lets wait a little and see what happens. Coming back form the arm problems he is coming back from, that necessitated the change in repertoire somewhat to take some pressure off the arm. The point remains, he has been most valuable; given the opportunity to close, there have been a lot of pitchers over the years who have transformed their repertoire. Sometimes its losing a pitch and gaining another, sometimes its coming back from a surgery or injury that necessitates a change. Baseball is littered with guys who have abandoned one or two pitches or refining another pitch they have. J.J. is no exception to that. I think the Sox and I both hope he continues with his resurgence. He was a dominant closer; he still remains as a useful and piece of the puzzle for the bullpen and Kenny is happy with him. No matter where he puts him, he will get an outstanding effort from him.

Question from David F--Wood Dale, IL: Steve, in regards to the White Sox, which areas do you think they can improve in? Do you feel they need to make trades to improve these areas?
Stone: I think the Sox would be the first to tell you that, a lot like the Cubs in this respect, they could use a left handed run producer. That being said, they are difficult to come by. When the cubs didnt make a specific offer to Bobby Abreu and allowed him to go to the Angels, only to try to fill that spot with first, Fukudome and second, Milton Bradley, it gives you some sort of an idea on how difficult it is to find that guy. Occasionally a player like Raul Ibanez will come onto the scene but not only his age and his position precludes some teams from acquiring him. Obviously the number one choice remains Adam Dunn; then it becomes, do you want to use him as a 2.5 or 3-month rental. If you do, its difficult to rationalize giving up one of your best young control and inexpensive major league players or giving them a couple very advanced but still young and controllable minor league players. That could be one of the sticking points as Washington looks to get rid of Dunn as others try to pursue him and see him as the missing piece of the puzzle. One area to look at is the bidding war for Seattle's Cliff Lee. He is probably the biggest prize as far as trade-ability is concerned. If you take a look at baseball standings, although things will clarify before the July 31st trade deadline, you can take a look at teams who are going to be sellers, looking to unload some players include Oakland, Seattle, Kansas City and Cleveland as well as Baltimore and quite possibly Toronto from the American league. In the national league, you have Arizona, Pittsburgh and Houston, certainly Washington and before its all over, the Cubs who at this writing are 10 under 500 and 9.5 games back in the central. They might find it advantageous if they fall a little deeper behind in the All-Star break to start to unload some of their higher salaried guys with or without the full no trade protection.

Question from Steven S--Orion, IL: With the turmoils and issues of Big Z and a no trade clause in his contract, what do you think are the Cubs best options to get this issue straightened out? Will they get him right or can they get some team to take him of the Cubs hands?

Stone: Fortunately that tricky bit of negotiation lands squarely in the lap of Jim Hendry who did manage to sign him to a long-term 91 million full no trade clause contract. I think it all comes down to, of the 45 million owed to the formerly Big Z, Jim is going to have to go to his owner Tom Ricketts and the Ricketts family and figure just how much he would be willing to ear of this contract. Already out there trying to trade Fukudome and eat as much as 12 million of his remaining guarantee dollars, one can only wonder just exactly how much of the contract or Big Z will they be able to move. It has been clearly illustrated before the blowup and after the blowup that at this point in his career; Tom Gorzelanny can actually out pitch Carlos Zambrano. And so, if Z does come back and is accepted on to the Cubs, the option of putting him back in the semi-limbo in the bullpen does not sound particularly appealing. Far be it for me to suggest to the boys on the North side on just how to get themselves out of this position, but I do know if you have some assets that are fairly valuable, it would be wise to move those assets before perhaps something happen that renders them unmovable. I of course am referring to the immediate attempt to trade Silva. They owe him 18 million for the remainder of this year and next year, and he is throwing the ball exceptionally well. However an occasional leg problem will lead to occasional back problems and I would be rushing onto the trade market to see if I can dump his contract, eliminate some salary for this year and next and perhaps get something of value before a guy who weighs what he does, eventually and inevitably starts to break down.

Question from Larry S--Chicago, IL: Do you see Andrew Cashner eventually ending up as a reliever or starter for the Cubs?
Stone: I think Andrew has the chance to be an exceptional pitcher. He has picked up some losses and the opposition has gotten to him but the Cubs envision him as a starter. I believe he has a very good speaking disposition; I had an opportunity to speak to him during CubsSox series. I think he would like to start, and Cashner being a young pitcher, an inexpensive pitcher, a controllable for a long time pitcher as far as the organization goes, I believe he will find his way into the starting rotation. He will certainly get the chance after this season, but could very well start in 2010 as an opportunity to stretch him out if they fall out of this race. If they do put together a hot streak and get back in the race, there is a good chance he stays in the bullpen for the remainder of this year.

Question from John S--Elmwood Park, IL: With two no-hitters, two perfect games, and one should've-been-perfect game, is this the year of the pitcher?

Stone: It certainly appears to be the year of the pitcher. Occasionally you have that which shows you a couple different things. One is that there are a lot of very good young pitchers coming up tot he Major Leagues and two, a lot of pitchers find themselves with quality bullpens behind them which on days when they dont have their great stuff, come in handy. I look at Felix Hernandez of Seattle and I see a guy despite a 6-5 record, has a 3.03 era, he just went and shut out the New York Yankees in New York. You look at baseball and you see some really good pitchers, Cincinnatis Johnny Cueto, the Yankees have Phil Hughes, Tampa Bay has David Price, Washington has Stephen Strasburg (though he hasnt had much of an opportunity to this point). You could probably go on and on with young pitchers around baseball that have suddenly burst on the scene and done a terrific job. No one can understand why one-year pitchers dominate. Hopefully there wont be any knee jerk reactions like in 1968. As a result of that year, the mound was lowered from its height of I believe 13 inches to 10 inches high where it still stays today. I would hope that baseball would not make any such tinkering with the mound again in a way to let the hitters resurge. I believe there is enough hitting and there is always going to be good pitchers, but now because of economics, they are giving younger pitchers with great arms a chance to get to the big leagues faster.

Carlos Rodon, White Sox shut down Mariners in series finale

Carlos Rodon, White Sox shut down Mariners in series finale

Carlos Rodon continued his best stretch of the season on Sunday afternoon.

The White Sox pitcher earned his fifth consecutive quality start in the team's 4-1 win over the Seattle Mariners at U.S. Cellular Field.

Rodon had another impressive day, finishing the game with six innings pitched while allowing one run on five hits and one walk. He also struck out six.

In his last five starts, Rodon is 3-0 and has allowed only six runs (five earned) while tacking on 26 strikeouts. He lowered his season ERA to 3.91.

"Carlos is really evolving. As he goes along he just seems to be getting better, there's more confidence there," manager Robin Ventura said. "He's learning a lot about himself as well, going through these. He gets extended somewhat, he's in there for a while, he's seeing these guys the third time around, which is good for him.

"He has the stuff to be able to do that and continue to do that, really. The future's really bright for him."

Though four runs were scored, it was mostly a quiet night for the White Sox offense, which finished the game with five hits. The team had two hits in the first seven innings and the remaining three came in the eighth.

The White Sox opened the scoring in the fourth inning with a single by Justin Morneau, which scored two.

Adam Eaton left the game in the fifth inning with a bruised right forearm after the White Sox outfielder was hit by a pitch in the fourth inning. X-rays were negative and he remains day-to-day. J.B. Shuck replaced him in center field.

"He got hit in the forearm and he couldn't hold on to the bat," Ventura said. "As of right now, he's just day to day."

The Mariners got on the board in the sixth thanks to a solo homer by Robinson Cano, his 30th of the year, to cut the lead in half.

On his 100th pitch of the day, Rodon was removed in the seventh after allowing back-to-back singles to lead off the inning.

"As a competitor, I want to be in that situation," Rodon said. "I didn’t want to come out. But when you’ve got a manager who has done it for awhile, he knows the game of baseball, he knows what he’s doing, obviously it worked out there. You put your trust in him and leave it to your teammates, let them do it.

"You’re up 2-1, you want a quick inning, you want another hold in that seventh. Didn’t really want to dip into the pen that early. I’ve been trying to stay in the game longer. Just a little frustrated. I want to be competitive, I still want to be out there. But hats off to my teammates once again for digging me out."

The White Sox bullpen shut down the Mariners the rest of the way in the final three innings. Chris Beck, Dan Jennings and Nate Jones combined for two scoreless innings.

In the eighth, Melky Cabrera legged out an RBI triple for the White Sox to pull ahead, 3-1. An RBI single from Jose Abreu, who was hit by a pitch twice, made it 4-1.

David Robertson closed out the ninth and earned his 33rd save of the season, which ranks third in the American League.

The White Sox are 63-66 on the season and have won six of their last eight. As it stands, the White Sox are 7.5 games out of a wild card spot and 10.5 behind the division-leading Cleveland Indians.

The White Sox picked the perfect time to heat up if there's any shot of them playing October baseball, with 27 of their last 33 games being against division opponents. 

"Anything’s possible," Morneau said. "It’ll take a lot but we do it one day at a time one game at a time. If we kind of prepare the way we need to prepare and go out there and do everything we can to win that day. If you look at the big picture it seems pretty overwhelming, but if you go out there and just try and do what you can everyday I think we’re still alive.

"We kind of control our own destiny."

White Sox: Adam Eaton is day-to-day with bruised right forearm

White Sox: Adam Eaton is day-to-day with bruised right forearm

Adam Eaton left Sunday's White Sox-Seattle Mariners series finale early with a bruised right forearm.

The White Sox outfielder was hit by a pitch to lead off the fourth inning in his second time at the plate. X-rays were negative.

"He got hit in the forearm and he couldn't hold on to the bat," manager Robin Ventura said after the game. "As of right now, he's just day to day."

Eaton remained in the game to field in the top of the fifth, but was replaced by J.B. Shuck for his next at-bat in the bottom of the inning.

White Sox Top Prospects: Jameson Fisher faring well with transition to outfield

White Sox Top Prospects: Jameson Fisher faring well with transition to outfield

Jameson Fisher entered the 2016 MLB Draft with experience at only catcher and first base.

When the White Sox drafted him in the fourth round (116th overall), little did he know he wasn’t going to start off his professional career at either of those positions.

The White Sox transitioned the Southeastern Louisiana product to outfielder. Fisher has a .953 field percentage in 35 games played at left field in the Advanced Rookie Class.

The 22-year-old credits outfield instructor Aaron Rowand and Great Falls hitting coach Willie Harris for helping him with the switch.

Fisher is batting .335/.425/.466 with three homers and 21 RBI this season with the Great Falls Voyagers. His .335 average ranks second on the team and his 12 stolen bases ranks third.

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This season at Southeastern Louisiana, Fisher had the best batting average (.449) and on-base percentage (.577) in college baseball.

Fisher played catcher in 2014 but transitioned to first base following a shoulder injury, which cause him to miss the entire 2015 season.

The White Sox signed Fisher for $485,000 on June 16.