SuperJuan: Uribe comes up clutch in World Series

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SuperJuan: Uribe comes up clutch in World Series

Thursday, Oct. 28, 2010
6:12 PM

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

Some fellas just know when to step up and make an impact, and Juan Uribe - author of the three-run clout that sprinkled the last bit of dirt over Texas Rangers ace Cliff Lee in Game 1 of the World Series on Wednesday - is one such fella.

Scour all you wish, but you wont find Uribe on the list of top 10 game-changing plays of the Chicago White Soxs 2005 World Series run. He came close, with his heroic defensive efforts to clinch the Series for the White Sox (sprinting into the right-field stands to snag Chris Burkes foul pop for the second out and his super-quick catch-and-fire retirement of Orlando Palmeiro to end the game) both adding 14 percent to the White Sox win probability.

But in contrast to his budding reputation as a playoff hero, Uribe has been a fairly lousy postseason performer. The sleeping Giant simply knows when to pick his spots and when he picks one, he doesnt miss.

For his career, Uribe carries just a .660 OPS into Thursdays Game 2 - thats downright bad, perhaps even duck-and-cover awful. The then-shortstop batted and slugged .800 in the American League Division Series vs. the Boston Red Sox in 2005, but his main clout was a homer in the runaway Game 1 win. He put up an .806 OPS in the 2005 World Series courtesy of three doubles in 16 at-bats, but his offensive output in that series - along with every other hitter on both the White Sox and Houston Astros - was underwhelming.

But overall, you could say Uribe was consistent in the 2005 playoffs, hitting in 10 of 12 games - and one of the games where he went hitless was Game 4 of the World Series, and we all know his ninth-inning defense helped make up for that.

In 2008, Uribe was horrible for the White Sox in the ALDS vs. the Tampa Bay Rays - two hits in 12 at-bats, with five strikeouts. Coupled with his .682 OPS in the 2008 regular season, Uribes work in the 2008 playoffs helped earn him his bus ticket out of town.

This year with the San Francisco Giants, Uribe kicked off the playoffs with his worst series ever - a .205 OPS, with just one hit in 14 at-bats and five strikeouts in the National League Division Series against the Atlanta Braves. Uribe was looking just as bad in this seasons National League Championship Series, heading into Game 5 vs. the Philadelphia Phillies just 1-for-11.

But then came Game 5, when Uribe went 2-for-3 with a home run and reached base three times in four plate appearances. It was unquestionably his greatest playoff game (his .306 Win Probability Added means Uribe alone can claim about one-third of San Franciscos win). In fact, Uribes impact in Game 5 was almost twice as great as any playoff game hed ever played in.

And Wednesday, Uribe had the ultimate all-or-nothing day, chasing his greatest playoff game by maximizing his impact in the World Series opener. The burgeoning Bay Area folk hero offset three strikeouts with that three-run homer that put the game away. It wasnt his second-best playoff game, not even close - but it did wonders to expand his legend.

Uribes hustle that ended the 2005 World Series is very likely the greatest succession of defensive plays to end a Fall Classic, rightfully earning the manic Dominican a place atop the World Series monument in Champions Plaza outside of U.S. Cellular Field. But it takes nothing away from the man that not a soul in Chicago would ever have expected him to be impacting another World Series so positively, some five seasons later.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.coms White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

Carlos Rodon, White Sox shut down Mariners in series finale

Carlos Rodon, White Sox shut down Mariners in series finale

Carlos Rodon continued his best stretch of the season on Sunday afternoon.

The White Sox pitcher earned his fifth consecutive quality start in the team's 4-1 win over the Seattle Mariners at U.S. Cellular Field.

Rodon had another impressive day, finishing the game with six innings pitched while allowing one run on five hits and one walk. He also struck out six.

In his last five starts, Rodon is 3-0 and has allowed only six runs (five earned) while tacking on 26 strikeouts. He lowered his season ERA to 3.91.

"Carlos is really evolving. As he goes along he just seems to be getting better, there's more confidence there," manager Robin Ventura said. "He's learning a lot about himself as well, going through these. He gets extended somewhat, he's in there for a while, he's seeing these guys the third time around, which is good for him.

"He has the stuff to be able to do that and continue to do that, really. The future's really bright for him."

Though four runs were scored, it was mostly a quiet night for the White Sox offense, which finished the game with five hits. The team had two hits in the first seven innings and the remaining three came in the eighth.

The White Sox opened the scoring in the fourth inning with a single by Justin Morneau, which scored two.

Adam Eaton left the game in the fifth inning with a bruised right forearm after the White Sox outfielder was hit by a pitch in the fourth inning. X-rays were negative and he remains day-to-day. J.B. Shuck replaced him in center field.

"He got hit in the forearm and he couldn't hold on to the bat," Ventura said. "As of right now, he's just day to day."

The Mariners got on the board in the sixth thanks to a solo homer by Robinson Cano, his 30th of the year, to cut the lead in half.

On his 100th pitch of the day, Rodon was removed in the seventh after allowing back-to-back singles to lead off the inning.

"As a competitor, I want to be in that situation," Rodon said. "I didn’t want to come out. But when you’ve got a manager who has done it for awhile, he knows the game of baseball, he knows what he’s doing, obviously it worked out there. You put your trust in him and leave it to your teammates, let them do it.

"You’re up 2-1, you want a quick inning, you want another hold in that seventh. Didn’t really want to dip into the pen that early. I’ve been trying to stay in the game longer. Just a little frustrated. I want to be competitive, I still want to be out there. But hats off to my teammates once again for digging me out."

The White Sox bullpen shut down the Mariners the rest of the way in the final three innings. Chris Beck, Dan Jennings and Nate Jones combined for two scoreless innings.

In the eighth, Melky Cabrera legged out an RBI triple for the White Sox to pull ahead, 3-1. An RBI single from Jose Abreu, who was hit by a pitch twice, made it 4-1.

David Robertson closed out the ninth and earned his 33rd save of the season, which ranks third in the American League.

The White Sox are 63-66 on the season and have won six of their last eight. As it stands, the White Sox are 7.5 games out of a wild card spot and 10.5 behind the division-leading Cleveland Indians.

The White Sox picked the perfect time to heat up if there's any shot of them playing October baseball, with 27 of their last 33 games being against division opponents. 

"Anything’s possible," Morneau said. "It’ll take a lot but we do it one day at a time one game at a time. If we kind of prepare the way we need to prepare and go out there and do everything we can to win that day. If you look at the big picture it seems pretty overwhelming, but if you go out there and just try and do what you can everyday I think we’re still alive.

"We kind of control our own destiny."

White Sox: Adam Eaton is day-to-day with bruised right forearm

White Sox: Adam Eaton is day-to-day with bruised right forearm

Adam Eaton left Sunday's White Sox-Seattle Mariners series finale early with a bruised right forearm.

The White Sox outfielder was hit by a pitch to lead off the fourth inning in his second time at the plate. X-rays were negative.

"He got hit in the forearm and he couldn't hold on to the bat," manager Robin Ventura said after the game. "As of right now, he's just day to day."

Eaton remained in the game to field in the top of the fifth, but was replaced by J.B. Shuck for his next at-bat in the bottom of the inning.

White Sox Top Prospects: Jameson Fisher faring well with transition to outfield

White Sox Top Prospects: Jameson Fisher faring well with transition to outfield

Jameson Fisher entered the 2016 MLB Draft with experience at only catcher and first base.

When the White Sox drafted him in the fourth round (116th overall), little did he know he wasn’t going to start off his professional career at either of those positions.

The White Sox transitioned the Southeastern Louisiana product to outfielder. Fisher has a .953 field percentage in 35 games played at left field in the Advanced Rookie Class.

The 22-year-old credits outfield instructor Aaron Rowand and Great Falls hitting coach Willie Harris for helping him with the switch.

Fisher is batting .335/.425/.466 with three homers and 21 RBI this season with the Great Falls Voyagers. His .335 average ranks second on the team and his 12 stolen bases ranks third.

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This season at Southeastern Louisiana, Fisher had the best batting average (.449) and on-base percentage (.577) in college baseball.

Fisher played catcher in 2014 but transitioned to first base following a shoulder injury, which cause him to miss the entire 2015 season.

The White Sox signed Fisher for $485,000 on June 16.