Thornton wants to be a lifetime White Sox

404267.jpg

Thornton wants to be a lifetime White Sox

Sunday, March 6, 2011
Posted: 11:31 a.m. Updated: 3:00 p.m.
By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. Matt Thornton has signed a two-year extension with the Chicago White Sox, with a team option for the 2014 season, the club announced Sunday morning.

White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen grabbed me this morning when it was official and said, Hey, I really appreciate you being one of the core guys, Thornton said. It means a lot to them that I want to stay here and be a part of this.

The news came as a bit of a surprise here, on a sleepy Cactus League Sunday.

We started talks a couple of weeks ago, and it went quickly, Thornton said. Im more than satisfied. It's an exciting situation, a substantial amount of money for my family and hopefully their children and on and on with my family.

According to Thornton, there was little question of leaving the White Sox.

It was an easy choice with an organization like this, with what they've done the last five months or so, retaining the core guys, adding the pieces, and expecting to win, he said. That's my goal, to win at least one World Series.

The extension will pay Thornton .5.5 million in both 2012 and 2013. The 2014 club option is worth 6 million, otherwise Thornton will earn a 1 million buyout. Thornton will be paid 3 million in 2011, as the White Sox exercised their option on the lefty fireballer last fall.

To a man, Thorntons teammates were thrilled for him.

Obviously he deserved it, hes one of the best, said fellow bullpen lefty Chris Sale. I come in here and see what he does, pay attention to him, see how he goes about his business, especially because since Ive been out in spring training because Ive never been here before. If Im following him, Im going in the right direction.

His preparation and what he does to stay healthy shows you that theres no shortcut, echoed reliever Sergio Santos. Matts got his plan and he does it every single day. He doesnt deviate from it. He has his schedule and he sticks with it from April to October, and thats impressive.

Im happy hes gonna be here, said catcher A.J. Pierzynski, making it clear he wasnt worried about facing Thornton in the future because he owns him to the tune of a career zero-of-one batting record). Hes another piece of the puzzle: Him, Jesse Crain, Will Ohman, Sale, Santos the extension pretty much just solidifies the bullpen and takes the question marks out of it. Its a big thingit means a lot to him personally but also to the organization because we know what we have and can build around those guys.

Pitching coach Don Cooper takes personal pride in Thorntons career, having made his reputation as one of the games greatest pitching doctors on his work with the towering lefthander. A converted starter acquired from the Seattle Mariners for onetime top White Sox prospect Joe Borchard, Thornton has excelled in his five seasons on the South Side under Coopers tutelage, posting a 3.14 ERA and 10.1 K9. He made his first All-Star appearance in 2010, when he also posted a career-best 2.14 Fielder Independent Pitching (FIP, which is a truer ERA measurement, based solely pitcher performance). Thorntons FIP has decreased in five consecutive seasons, from 6.20 in 2005 with Seattle to last years mark.

Its nice to see guys being successful and making money, and its well deserved, Cooper said. This is not a gift, obviously, its deserved, through his work, and effort, and all that stuff. I backtrack it to how hes prepared: Every single day hes here early, and its nice to see hard work rewarded at the end of the day.

Impressionable young pitchers Sale, Santos, and John Danks all attested to the impact Thorntons hard-nosed attitude has had on them.

If theres anybody deserving, its definitely Matt, Santos said. Just being with him all last year, his work ethic speaks volumes. Its nice to see when you see a guy who does all the things right way and busts his tail.

He comes in every single day and is one of the first guys here. He works his tail off, Sale said. Thats why hes had the success hes had, because he prepares the way he prepares. I watch the way he goes about his businessyou come in here at any given time and hes always doing something: In the training room doing the shoulder program, being in the weight room working out. Thats why he is who he is and why hes had the success hes had.

He gets here, gets his work done, doesnt have to make a big deal of it and let everyone know, said the laid-back Danks, who appreciates the value of working hard on the down low.

Pierzynski, who has caught many of the biggest moments of Thorntons career, also attests to the veterans work ethic: Hes worked his tail off since hes been here. Matt takes the ball every time we ask him, doesnt complain.

Thornton had a career-high eight saves last season, taking over the balance of closer duties in the last month of the season, as Bobby Jenks was sidelined by injury. In 61 games, Thornton led all American League relievers in K9 (12.02), strikeouts (81), and inherited runners scoring percentage (.129). The lefthander was eighth in the A.L. in KBB (4.05) and holds (21) and was ninth in opponents batting average (.191). Thornton held lefties to a .175 average with 44 punchouts. He is one of four relievers (former Seattle teammate Arthur Rhodes, Pedro Feliciano, and Matt Guerrier) to record at least 20 holds in each of the last four seasons. He is the all-time White Sox leader in holds (100) and ranks fifth in club history with 336 relief appearances.

No decision has been made yet on whether Thornton will take the closers reins from the departed Jenks in 2011, but an extension that nearly doubles his 2010 salary indicates it is his position to lose this spring.

No, no, were still trying to work on what we need to get right with each guy, Cooper said when asked on Sunday whether Thornton is cemented as the teams closer. I dont believe thats going to be talked about at least until our next meeting, and I dont even know when thats scheduled. Our bullpen looks like its strength is flexibility; we feel like anybody can go out there and close a game on a given day.

As for Thornton, hes not hung up on any particular role with the White Sox. Hes simply happy to renew his return address labels.

I have no idea about closing. Im not worried about that at all. I don't care, whatever you want me to do, Thornton said, laughing. Ive made it clear I will do what they want, even before the deal. They gave me security and they trust me. My goal is to stay in Chicago the rest of my career.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

How Tim Anderson's new glasses could benefit him at the plate

How Tim Anderson's new glasses could benefit him at the plate

Though he only has worn them for one game, Tim Anderson had been preparing to break in his new glasses for several weeks.

White Sox manager Rick Renteria said Tuesday evening that Anderson recently purchased new corrective lenses after he asked for additional testing beyond what teams normally offer. Though he’d recently worn the glasses around the clubhouse and in batting practice, Anderson didn’t break them in until Monday night. The second-year shortstop homered for the first time in nearly a month Monday and finished 2-for-5 with three RBIs in the club’s loss to the New York Yankees.

If the glasses help Anderson’s vision at the plate, the White Sox are all for it. Anderson entered Tuesday’s game hitting .253/.278/.377 with seven home runs and 24 RBIs in 285 plate appearances.

“The ball can travel anywhere from Shields' 69 miles per hour curveball to Chapman's 100 miles per hour fastball,” Renteria said. “It's very important to be able to see the baseball. It's obviously a split-second decision. It's very dangerous to be in there and not be able to see the ball. If that helps him, if that's a part of continuing to move forward, I hope that's part of what helps clear him up.”

[VIVID SEATS: Buy you White Sox tickets here]

Anderson said after Monday’s game he plans to wear the lenses the rest of the season, though he didn’t think the glasses make a huge difference. Still, the fact he homered after going 96 plate appearances in between round-trippers didn’t escape third baseman Todd Frazier, who made a joke suggesting Anderson downplayed the significance. Anderson said he’s spent several days recently adjusting to the glasses in preparation for the game and wears them at bat and in the field.

“I’ve been using them in BP,” Anderson said. “Trying to get used to them.”

Renteria said players get their vision checked every spring. Anderson’s request for additional screening isn’t out of the ordinary, Renteria said.

“Timmy just told us he wanted to get his eyes checked, so he did,” Renteria said. “Obviously, he's wearing the glasses that he wears now. He's trying to get comfortable with them. He'd had them for at least 2 1/2 weeks, 3 weeks. But he's kind of been hesitant to put them on. I know (Todd Steverson) spoke to him. He's going to use them, feel comfortable with them, start using them in the workouts and BP.”

Last-place White Sox ready to trade, but only if the right offer arises

Last-place White Sox ready to trade, but only if the right offer arises

That the White Sox lost their fourth consecutive game doesn’t change the big picture plans of the franchise, which probably — but not definitely — will involve making at least one trade before the end of July.

Before the White Sox lost, 6-5, to the New York Yankees Monday at Guaranteed Rate Field, general manager Rick Hahn met with the media and delivered the same message he’s had since trading away Chris Sale and Adam Eaton in December. The White Sox are open for business, and would like to make a number of moves to further bolster their farm system, but won’t make a trade if they don’t receive what they view to be a fair return.

“Would I be surprised (if we didn’t make a trade)? No, because I try not to be surprised by the dynamics of this market,” Hahn said. “Would I be mildly disappointed? Sure. We are here to try to improve this club.

“We feel we have certain first and desirable players that would help other clubs and may fit better on their competitive windows then they do on ours right now. And we intend to be active each day in trying to further accomplish what we set out to do a year ago at this time.

“But do we have to do it? No. That would be using an artificial spot on the calendar to force decision-making. That would be the last thing we need to do. We need to take a long term view of what we are trying to accomplish.”

Hahn didn’t name names, but Todd Frazier, Melky Cabrera, David Robertson could be short-term fixes for contending clubs. Jose Quintana, who will start Tuesday against the Yankees, remains the team’s most valuable trade chip despite a 4.69 ERA that sits over run higher than his career average.

Frazier homered Monday and entered the game hitting .262/.351/.524 since Memorial Day. Cabrera similarly has found success after a slow start, slashing a healthy .324/.375/.482 in his previous 34 games before picking up two hits in four at-bats Monday. And Robertson, who’s been linked to the relief-starved Washington Nationals for months, has 41 strikeouts in 27 1/3 innings with 11 saves.

“We want to be able to do as much as we can in our power to get this team to where it needs to be,” Hahn said. “Yes, there’s an element of competitiveness involved in that. There’s an element of patience involved in that. But at the end of the day, we have to — we get paid to be prudent in our decision making. We have to make the right decision.”

In the meantime, the White Sox looked the part of a rebuilding team with the worst record in the American League on Monday. Starter David Holmberg struggled, allowing six runs on five hits and four walks in 5 1/3 innings — but only two of those runs were earned thanks to errors by Holmberg, Frazier and Matt Davidson.

As the Yankees took advantage of those miscues with three runs in both the fourth and sixth innings, Jordan Montgomery retired nine consecutive White Sox batters and went on to cruise with eight strikeouts over seven innings. The White Sox – as they’ve done quite a bit this year – still showed fight late, battling back in the ninth inning.

Tim Anderson ripped a three-run home run in the ninth inning off Yankees left-hander Chasen Shreve to bring the White Sox within two. Joe Girardi quickly turned to Aroldis Chapman, who allowed a run when Jose Abreu doubled home Melky Cabrera. But the tying run was stranded on second when Avisail Garcia grounded out and Frazier flew out to end the game.