What can the Sox spend in the 2012 draft?

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What can the Sox spend in the 2012 draft?

Last year, the Kansas City Royals gave Bubba Starling a 7.5 million signing bonus to keep him from playing football at the University of Nebraska. In 2012, they'll only be able to spend a total of 6,101,500 on their first 10 picks.

That's how MLB's new collective bargaining agreement sets things up. It's bad news for teams like the Royals and Rays that have built great farm systems by investing heavily in the draft. It could be bad news for MLB's talent pool, too, as teams won't be able to offer lucrative contracts to high schoolers to keep them from playing another sport.

But for the White Sox, the new CBA is great with regard to the draft. While many teams are seeing their draft allocation slashed from their 2011 spending total, the White Sox allocation of 5,915,100 is nearly triple what they spent on their top 10 picks last year. Granted, the Sox didn't have a true first-round pick, but they've never been a team that's been aggressive in spending on high-schoolers in their first 10 picks.

Quite a few analysts have noted the new CBA brings most every team in baseball down to the White Sox level in terms of draft spending. These draft budgets are a pretty clear indication that's the case.

White Sox come back to beat Yankees on walk-off single by Jose Abreu

White Sox come back to beat Yankees on walk-off single by Jose Abreu

The White Sox offense put it together in just enough time on Tuesday night.

Jose Abreu’s bases-loaded single with two outs helped the White Sox rally from down two runs late for a 4-3 win over the New York Yankees in front of 18,023 at Guaranteed Rate Field. Abreu’s two-out single off Dellin Betances helped the White Sox avoid missing out on two bases-loaded opportunities in the final two innings.

It all came a little too late for Jose Quintana, who earned a no decision in spite of 6 1/3 scoreless innings. But given they had the winning run on board in a one-run loss on Monday and only scored once despite loading the bases with no outs in the eighth, the White Sox will take it.

Abreu, who struck out in the eighth with no outs after three straight walks, got ahead of Betances 2-1 in the count before he singled through the left side to score the tying and go-ahead runs.

Quintana earned the 63rd no decision of his career when the Yankees broke through in the eighth inning against Tommy Kahnle, who had a rare poor performance. Kahnle gave up a game-tying, two-out single to Aaron Judge and a two-run double to Gary Sanchez as the White Sox went from up a run to trailing 3-1.

The White Sox loaded the bases with no outs in the bottom of the eighth on all walks, but only scored once. Abreu struck out, Avisail Garcia flew out and Matt Davidson also whiffed to leave the bases loaded. The White Sox lone run came on a two-out walk by Todd Frazier.

The same offensive woes kept them from breaking out with Quintana on the hill. While they provided lavish run support in his previous two starts, the White Sox were back to their old ways with Quintana on Tuesday. They did give him a 1-0 lead when Abreu cued a two-out RBI double off Luis Severino.

But Severino was otherwise a machine as he struck out 12 batters and walked none. Severino struck out the side in the second and seventh innings and retired the last nine batters he faced.

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Still, Quintana didn’t need anything other than the early run. He continues to look more like himself as the July 31 nonwaiver trade deadline approaches, making his third straight good turn.

Quintana worked with a good curveball/fastball combo to keep the Yankees off-balance. The 2016 All-Star thrived in the few instances when he got into trouble.

He struck out Tyler Austin with two men in scoring position to end the fourth inning and erased a leadoff walk in the fifth with an Austin Romine double play. After Quintana surrendered a two-out double to Judge in the sixth inning, he got Sanchez to pop out to strand the tying run.

Quintana allowed two hits, walked four and struck out six in 6 1/3 scoreless innings. Since he was hit hard by the Boston Red Sox on May 30, Quintana has been excellent, lowering his ERA from 5.30 to 4.37. In that span, Quintana has allowed 21 hits and six earned runs with 12 walks and 30 strikeouts in 30 1/3 innings.

How Tim Anderson's new glasses could benefit him at the plate

How Tim Anderson's new glasses could benefit him at the plate

Though he only has worn them for one game, Tim Anderson had been preparing to break in his new glasses for several weeks.

White Sox manager Rick Renteria said Tuesday evening that Anderson recently purchased new corrective lenses after he asked for additional testing beyond what teams normally offer. Though he’d recently worn the glasses around the clubhouse and in batting practice, Anderson didn’t break them in until Monday night. The second-year shortstop homered for the first time in nearly a month Monday and finished 2-for-5 with three RBIs in the club’s loss to the New York Yankees.

If the glasses help Anderson’s vision at the plate, the White Sox are all for it. Anderson entered Tuesday’s game hitting .253/.278/.377 with seven home runs and 24 RBIs in 285 plate appearances.

“The ball can travel anywhere from Shields' 69 miles per hour curveball to Chapman's 100 miles per hour fastball,” Renteria said. “It's very important to be able to see the baseball. It's obviously a split-second decision. It's very dangerous to be in there and not be able to see the ball. If that helps him, if that's a part of continuing to move forward, I hope that's part of what helps clear him up.”

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Anderson said after Monday’s game he plans to wear the lenses the rest of the season, though he didn’t think the glasses make a huge difference. Still, the fact he homered after going 96 plate appearances in between round-trippers didn’t escape third baseman Todd Frazier, who made a joke suggesting Anderson downplayed the significance. Anderson said he’s spent several days recently adjusting to the glasses in preparation for the game and wears them at bat and in the field.

“I’ve been using them in BP,” Anderson said. “Trying to get used to them.”

Renteria said players get their vision checked every spring. Anderson’s request for additional screening isn’t out of the ordinary, Renteria said.

“Timmy just told us he wanted to get his eyes checked, so he did,” Renteria said. “Obviously, he's wearing the glasses that he wears now. He's trying to get comfortable with them. He'd had them for at least 2 1/2 weeks, 3 weeks. But he's kind of been hesitant to put them on. I know (Todd Steverson) spoke to him. He's going to use them, feel comfortable with them, start using them in the workouts and BP.”