Chicago White Sox

What's wrong with Ubaldo: A Cleveland Indians preview

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What's wrong with Ubaldo: A Cleveland Indians preview

With the White Sox opening a three-game series tonight against Cleveland at U.S. Cellular Field, we reached out to Lewie Pollis of the fantastic Indians blog Wahoo's on First for his thoughts on the state of the first-place Tribe:

What, if anything, are you expecting out of Johnny Damon now that he's finally in the fold?
Not a whole lot. Damon still knows how to weasel his way on base and both his bat and his cleats will both be nice to have off the bench, but Damon almost certainlywon't be an improvementover incumbent left fielder Shelley Duncan on either side of the ball, and since neither player really struggles against same-handed pitchers they'd be an odd couple to platoon.
I'd be thrilled if Damon's role is that of a pinch hitter, fourth outfielder and backup DH. But he reportedly hasa gentleman's agreementwith Chris Antonetti to play regularly, so I'm afraid the Indians will be hamstrung into giving him more playing time that he should get. Hard to tell exactly what that means, though.
No team in baseball has taken a higher percentage of walks than Cleveland. Was that expected?

No, it wasn't. It does make some sense, though. Carlos Santana has always been a bona fide stoic at the plate. Shin-Soo Choo, Travis Hafner, Jack Hannahan, Casey Kotchman, Shelley Duncan, Lou Marson they're not all good hitters, but they all have solid plate discipline. That's never really been a concern for this team. So it's not as though this came out of left field.
Shin-Soo Choo has a .375 OBP but has the power numbers of, like, Juan Pierre. Are you concerned about him?
After 72 plate appearances, there isn't a whole lot that concerns me. That said, we saw Choo's power numbers fall last year too, which from an on-field standpoint was the biggest reason for his down year. He's still hitting line drives and demonstrating solid plate discipline, so some of his pop should come back. Anyway, his days of hitting 20 homers a year are probably over, but he's not this anemic. And even if he is, his speed and pitch selectiveness make him an above-average hitter.
What should we make of Travis Hafner? Will the power ever come back?
The MVP-caliber light-tower power that made him arguably the best hitter in the league? That's been gone for six years. But he's gotten his slugging percentage back to the mid-.400's four years in a row now (if we include 2012) and he's got enough pop and plate discipline left in the tank that he's still one of the Tribe's best hitters.
Hafner is tremendously frustrating for Indians fans. He's incredibly overpriced and the Indians have a ton of payroll tied up in him, and since he can't play the field anymore he's limited the Tribe's DH flexibility for almost a decade now. But through it all he's been a huge part of this Cleveland offense, and there's nobody else in the organization who could replace his production.
What's wrong with Ubaldo Jimenez and Justin Masterson?
It's a lot of things going wrong for Masterson. His velocity is down across the board. He's abandoning his bread-and-butter fastball and sinker in favor of more sliders and changeups. He's struggling to find the plate and doesn't seem eager to challenge hitters. And there are times as when he walked Brendan Ryan and beaned John Jaso with the bases loaded where it seems like he has absolutely no control over where the ball is going.
Meanwhile, Ubaldo just can't seem to strike hitters out. (Masterson has had the same problem, but his game is not based on punchouts to the same degree as Jimenez'.) His velocity is down quite a bit his fastball has dropped almost 4 mph since 2010 and he just isn't fooling hitters. He's gone from "effectively wild" to just plain wild.
I don't mean to overdramatize or read too much into small sample sizes, but it isn't just superficial to say that neither pitcher looks like his normal self.
Series prediction?
I'll say the Indians take two of three. I'm not confident about game one (Chris Sale...oy) but I like our chances in games two and three.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Hawk rips Lackey, Swarzak traded, Coop misses Q

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Hawk rips Lackey, Swarzak traded, Coop misses Q

After a wild day at Wrigley Field against the Cubs, Chuck Garfien and Dan Hayes discuss John Lackey hitting four White Sox batters and also play Hawk Harrelson's epic on-air rant directed at the Cubs pitcher.

"Jeff the Sox Fan" appears on the podcast and suggests what he thinks Jose Abreu should have done to Lackey when he was hit for a second time.

While they taped the podcast, Anthony Swarzak was traded to the Brewers. What kind of return did the White Sox get? Garfien also interviews White Sox pitching coach Don Cooper about losing Quintana to the Cubs, why he can't watch Quintana and Chris Sale pitch in different uniform, when some minor leaguers like Reynaldo Lopez will be called up and more.

Listen to the full episode at this link or in the embedded player below:

How White Sox aggressive deadline strategy paid off in Anthony Swarzak trade

How White Sox aggressive deadline strategy paid off in Anthony Swarzak trade

The White Sox jumped out ahead of a crowded reliever market once again and traded Anthony Swarzak to the Milwaukee Brewers on Tuesday night.

The White Sox acquired 25-year-old outfielder Ryan Cordell from the Brewers in exchange for the veteran reliever, a baseball source confirmed. The No. 17 prospect in the Brewers farm system, Cordell was hitting .284/.349/.506 with 10 home runs and 45 RBIs in 292 plate appearances at Triple-A Colorado Springs this season.

A nonroster invitee to big league camp this spring, Swarzak was 4-3 with a 2.23 ERA, one save and 52 strikeouts in 48 1/3 innings this season. He’s the third reliever the White Sox have traded since the second half began as they also dealt David Robertson and Tommy Kahnle to the New York Yankees with Todd Frazier on July 18.

TA free agent after the season, Swarzak has fared extremely well in high-leverage situations, stranding 26 of the 35 runners he had inherited. He pitched in two high-leverage spots in the team’s previous two games, earning his first career save Monday. Swarzak, whose 9.68 strikeouts per nine is a career high, also earned a hold on Sunday in Kansas City.

“I’ve been waiting for that opportunity for a long time,” Swarzak said of Monday’s save. “It’s nice that I went in there and got it done. You think about that moment for years and then it finally happens. You just are trying to take a step back and reflect on what just happened, and I’ll be able to come in tomorrow and be ready to go.”

Two American League scouts said Monday that Swarzak still had good trade value even though he’s viewed as a rental. While he wouldn’t likely net the White Sox a top-150 prospect, they could wrangle a “good” minor-leaguer in a deal. One element that could have potentially derailed the White Sox was an abundance of strong relief options in the market, perhaps as many as 20 pitchers.

[MORE: Carlos Rodon frustrated again after a weird start

After the White Sox traded Robertson and Kahnle, general manager Rick Hahn indicated they moved the pair early in anticipation of a competitive marketplace when they acquired Blake Rutherford and others from the New York Yankees. The Baltimore Orioles are a team that could have wreaked havoc on the relief market if they decide to sell -- something one AL source said they’ve gone back and forth on every day -- because they could flood it with Zach Britton and others.

The move is the third made by the White Sox in a span of two weeks, including the trade of Jose Quintana to the Cubs on July 13. The White Sox still have several veterans on the roster who could draw trade interest, including starting pitcher Miguel Gonzalez.

“We are still open for business,” Hahn said last week.

Today’s Knuckleball’s Jon Heyman first reported the deal that sent Swarzak to the Brewers. Fox Sports’ Ken Rosenthal initially reported the teams’ were discussing a trade for Swarzak.