White Sox free agency primer

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White Sox free agency primer

As the opening of the free-agent market nears, generalmanager Rick Hahn doesnt want to guess about where any of the White Sox threefree agents might land.As of midnight Saturday, A.J. Pierzynski, Brett Myers and KevinYoukilis are free to sign with any team they prefer. The team isnt expected tomake a qualifying offer to any, Hahn said. And though their chance to retainplayers is reduced significantly once they become available to all teams, Hahnsaid, he knows the strength of relationships means nothing is certain. I dont want to handicap it because if I were sitting heretwo years ago the last time A.J hit free agency I would have given you a reallow, low number on the likelihood of returning and then at the 11th hour wewere able to work something out, Hahn said. Free agency has a weird way withyour own guys of unfolding. Theres a fair amount of sentimentality on bothsides and you never really know a guy is gone until hes gone.After eight years on the South Side, the decision regarding Pierzynskihas the most sentimentality attached. The veteran catcher also figures to, alongwith Youkilis, be the most difficult to sign. Pierzynski earned 6 million lastseason when he hit a career-high 27 home runs and tied his career-best with 77RBIs. He and Texas Rangers free agent Mike Napoli figure to be thetop options at a premium position. Pierzynskis potential return is alsofurther muddled because the White Sox have a potential replacement in TylerFlowers, who hit seven home runs in limited play and is strong defensively.Whereas the club could be comfortable with Flowers behindthe dish -- though a fracture in his hand will keep Flowers from playing winter ballas the team hoped -- there isnt as much certainty at third base. With thehealth of Brent Morels back still in question and no prospects consideredmajor-league ready, third base seems to be of a higher priority for the WhiteSox. Whether or not they can retain Youkilis, the top free agentat the position in a thin class, remains in question. Though a major leaguesource said the White Sox have indicated they want to speak to Youkilis -- whohad 15 homers and 46 RBIs after he was acquired from Boston on June 24 -- whenits time, they may face too much competition. Youkilis is prepared to signto play either first base or third base and has received a good level ofinterest thus far, according to a baseball source.Youkilis also may prefer to play closer to home in the SanFrancisco area. Late in the season, Youkilis wife gave birth to the couplesfirst child. In early October, the veteran said family would play a significantrole in his decision.Myers, who was 3-4 with a 3.12 ERA in 35 games after he cameover in a trade from Houston, has also probably increased the size of hismarket because he would make himself available as both a starter and areliever.Late in the season, executive vice president of baseballoperations Kenny Williams said the club considered retaining Myers, who had a10 million option, as a starter. Myers, who is 89-79 with a 4.27 ERA as astarter and has a 3.36 ERA and 40 saves as reliever, said he is open to anysituation.Ive got the mentality, I want to pitch, Myers said.Whichever way a team wants me to go Ill do. I think Ive proven I can start.Ive proven I can do both. Hindsight is 2020. Some teams might like me in thebullpen. Some might like me as a starter. Its up to the team.One final -- and potentially gigantic -- factor is how muchmoney the White Sox have to spend. After the team signed Jake Peavy for 14.5 million thisseason and picked up Gavin Floyds 9.5 million option, the White Sox have nineplayers under contract for a total of 89.25 million (7 million of Konerkos13.5 million is deferred). Hahn said Thursday the club will operate on roughlythe same amount as 2012, when they began the season with a 97.669 millionpayroll. With Gordon Beckham and Alejandro De Aza both arbitration eligible,the team has a limited amount of money with which to operate. That may forceHahn to be creative in addressing his needs, including trading players off thecurrent roster.We certainly would like to have them back, Hahn said. Theyneed to see what their market is. It just wont happen as quickly as wed like.Were not closing the door on any of our free agents.

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Todd Frazier wasn’t pleased with a call Saturday afternoon that led to the first ejection of his career.

It’s not that the White Sox third baseman is arguing about whether or not he deserved to get thrown out in the seventh inning of a 10-2 loss to the Oakland A’s. Frazier is more miffed by first-base umpire Sam Holbrook’s initial ruling --- that his throw pulled Jose Abreu off the bag --- and the determination by replay officials that the call was correct.

Frazier was ejected shortly after word arrived that the call stands, which means officials in New York didn’t believe they have enough evidence to overturn the original ruling. That fact bothered Frazier, who was charged with an error and began to speak his mind. White Sox manager Rick Renteria was ejected shortly thereafter for the third straight home game.

“It’s just frustrating with the technology we have today,” Frazier said. “It’s just crazy. It boggles your mind. It really does. You know -- I’m the one. I’m vocal. I’m emotional. But when it’s wrong, 100 percent wrong. I saw it on the MLB Network. I saw it in our cameras and our computers. I just don’t understand how we can see it and they can’t see it in New York. It’s just, it’s frustrating as all hell to be honest with you. It turned into a big inning. We were down a lot, don’t get me wrong. But still, Jake (Petricka) is pitching his heart out and next thing you know he gives up an unearned run and two more runs. So it’s really not that hard. Honest. It’s not that hard.”

Renteria raced onto the field in an attempt to save Frazier from a quick ejection, but didn’t have enough time. It was the third home game in a row in which a White Sox player was ejected for the first time in their career. Tim Anderson got the boot on Friday night after he argued with plate umpire Jim Wolf. And Avisail Garcia got tossed from the June 15 series finale against the Baltimore Orioles.

Renteria said taking into context who his players are and their track record made him want to further defend their actions.

“I don't ever go into a situation arguing with someone to get thrown out,” Renteria said. “I don't. I think what happens is, like anybody emotionally, when you start talking and expressing yourself, you have a tendency to get heated. You don't plan on doing that. I certainly don't go out there planning on having that happen. I think what happens, and I think it's just human nature, you start thinking about the whole situation, you're losing a player. You're losing a guy that's supposed to be in there for the next two, three innings to help you maybe continue to chip away. Our team has been fighting every day, since day one of spring training. I don’t care what our record is, I don't care what the score is, we fight. And when you take one of those pieces out of the lineup, you get pissed.”

Even though he had a chance to cool off, Frazier still felt the same after the contest. He stuck his head into the team’s video room after the game to check out the play. Teams have a variety of angles from which they can determine whether or not to challenge a call. They also have the option of taking a freeze frame and magnifying the picture, which left no doubt in Frazier’s mind that the call was incorrect.

“Like I said just frustrating,” Frazier said. “It’s just not that hard. And with all the technology like I said, I don’t mean to repeat ourselves, but with all the technology and 8 different angles it’s just one of those things where I just can’t let that go. It turned into a huge inning. You never know. We were down 6 we coulda came back. You gotta be 100 percent. You gotta be 100 percent right on that and I really don’t think he was.”