White Sox morning roundup

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White Sox morning roundup

From yesterday:

Oney Guillen tweeted that his father could control "ANYBODY" with regard to Carlos Zambrano's move to Miami. But Ozzie Guillen hasn't controlled everybody, be that Nick Swisher, Brian Anderson or even Sean Tracey. All of those guys were eventually forced out. And, if we're going there, if Ozzie could control everybody he probably should've controlled Oney throughout his various twitter diatribes aimed against the organization, Bobby Jenks, etc.

Pat Mooney says the Ozzie-Zambrano union was bound to happen ever since Zambrano quit on the Cubs and Guillen moved on to Miami.

After Zambrano's June 25, 2010 dugout tirade, Guillen followed through with plans to go out to dinner with the suspended Cubs pitcher and told the media he could manage Zambrano.

If you're sick of Ozzie and don't care about Zambrano, the other bit of White Sox-related news we had from Wednesday was that former Sox top prospectthird basemanfirst basemanleft fielder Josh Fields (sidebar: remember when he played left? That was an...adventure) signed a minor-league deal with the Dodgers.

Andy Gray (@SI_Vault) tweeted out a photo of two nuns wearing Royals caps taking in a Kansas City - White Sox game from 1982.

James at White Sox Observer takes a look at valuations of a few former White Sox players, with one final note about Scott Linebrink and the Twins -- a match TwinsCentric's Parker Hageman says makes some sense.

And in inconsequential minor league news, the White Sox signed Corey Smith to a minor-league deal.

Around the division:

I'm not sure how Joe Saunders is in a position to have salary demands outside of the Tigers' price range, but that's what James Schmehl of the Detroit Free Press thinks. His 3.69 ERA last year was a mirage (he's never had a full year in his career with a FIP lower than 4.36), and moving back to the American League, even in a pitcher's park like Detroit, would almost certainly exacerbate a regression. So, in short, hopefully Saunders' price tag isn't out of Detroit's range.

And finally, Francisco Liriano will pitch in the Dominican Winter League, but won't throw more than 20 innings.

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

On his 24th birthday, Tim Anderson’s present from home plate umpire Jim Wolf was his first major-league ejection.

In the fifth inning of the White Sox 3-0 loss to the Oakland Athletics, Anderson fouled off a pitch that landed in the opposing batter’s box. But A’s catcher Bruce Maxwell picked it up in what was ruled to be fair territory and threw the ball to first for the out.

Anderson pleaded his case saying the ball went foul. Wolf agreed, according to Anderson, which only further confused the White Sox shortstop.

“I told him that was BS,” Anderson said. “And he tossed me.”

Anderson said that he was surprised to be ejected so fast. So was manager Rick Renteria, who was thrown out moments after Anderson.

“I don’t want to get in trouble,” Renteria said. “The players having emotion, they are battling. I just think we need to grow a little thicker skin.”

Anderson said that he was appreciative of his manager coming to his defense.

“He kinda had a point and let me know he had my back,” Anderson said of Renteria. “Speaks a lot of him.”

A day after scoring nine runs on 18 hits, the White Sox failed to generate any offense on Friday. The team’s best chance came in the ninth inning.

But with runners at the corners and two outs, Matt Davidson put a good rip on the ball to center field, only to fly out at the warning track.

Anderson and Renteria were watching the game together in the clubhouse, and both believed the White Sox had tied the ballgame.

“We all jumped up and were excited but it kind of fell short,” Anderson said.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Exclusive interview with Mark Buehrle

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Exclusive interview with Mark Buehrle

On the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast, Chuck Garfien goes 1-on-1 with the star of the weekend, Mark Buehrle.

Buehrle tells an absolutely amazing bachelor party story and discloses why he wore No. 56.

Take a trip down memory lane and listen to the White Sox Talk Podcast here