White Sox morning roundup

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White Sox morning roundup

From the weekend:

White Sox spring training is off and running, and the White Sox have gone from "All In" to "Don't Care," reports Chuck Garfien from Glendale.

Garfien sat down for a one-on-one with Jake Peavy in which the White Sox starter discussed the state of his health and the rocky nature of his relationship with Ozzie Guillen last September. Peavy also backed John Danks to get the start on opening day April 5 in Texas.

Addison Reed has always wanted to be a closer, drawing inspiration from watching Troy Percival finish off games for the Angels. Reed was named the No. 44 prospect in baseball on John Sickels' top 120 list, with Nestor Molina cracking the list as well. Meanwhile, Chris Sale wants to throw 200 innings in his first year as a starter with the White Sox.

Jeff Manto has a plan for both Alex Rios and Adam Dunn, both of whom showed up to spring training in Arizona early. Robin Ventura also mentioned he's "patient" regarding Dunn and is hopeful the slugger can turn things around. And Rios, under the watch of Greg Walker, did turn things around last September after making a tweak to his stance.

Tyler Flowers and A.J. Pierzynski didn't always get along, but the Sox catching tandem now appear to have at least a working relationship. But Pierzynski has never been pushed by a young catcher with the White Sox -- could that mean an end to his 1,000-plus inning streak?

Ozzie Guillen didn't directly admit he screwed up in his final season(s) with the White Sox, but it certainly looked that way in this tweet.

AL Central infirmary: Joel Zumaya will have to undergo Tommy John surgery and may retire, Justin Morneau may take the same path if his concussion issues return, Grady Sizemore is once again hurt and Chris Perez is out 4-6 weeks.

Potpourri: MLB may adopt an international draft, Pete Fitzgerald addresses some early questions, Jim looks at emerging spring themes and James examines spring training optimism.

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

Tim Anderson's birthday present from home plate umpire was first major-league ejection

On his 24th birthday, Tim Anderson’s present from home plate umpire Jim Wolf was his first major-league ejection.

In the fifth inning of the White Sox 3-0 loss to the Oakland Athletics, Anderson fouled off a pitch that landed in the opposing batter’s box. But A’s catcher Bruce Maxwell picked it up in what was ruled to be fair territory and threw the ball to first for the out.

Anderson pleaded his case saying the ball went foul. Wolf agreed, according to Anderson, which only further confused the White Sox shortstop.

“I told him that was BS,” Anderson said. “And he tossed me.”

Anderson said that he was surprised to be ejected so fast. So was manager Rick Renteria, who was thrown out moments after Anderson.

“I don’t want to get in trouble,” Renteria said. “The players having emotion, they are battling. I just think we need to grow a little thicker skin.”

Anderson said that he was appreciative of his manager coming to his defense.

“He kinda had a point and let me know he had my back,” Anderson said of Renteria. “Speaks a lot of him.”

A day after scoring nine runs on 18 hits, the White Sox failed to generate any offense on Friday. The team’s best chance came in the ninth inning.

But with runners at the corners and two outs, Matt Davidson put a good rip on the ball to center field, only to fly out at the warning track.

Anderson and Renteria were watching the game together in the clubhouse, and both believed the White Sox had tied the ballgame.

“We all jumped up and were excited but it kind of fell short,” Anderson said.

White Sox Talk Podcast: Exclusive interview with Mark Buehrle

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USA TODAY

White Sox Talk Podcast: Exclusive interview with Mark Buehrle

On the latest edition of the White Sox Talk Podcast, Chuck Garfien goes 1-on-1 with the star of the weekend, Mark Buehrle.

Buehrle tells an absolutely amazing bachelor party story and discloses why he wore No. 56.

Take a trip down memory lane and listen to the White Sox Talk Podcast here