Who would you want back from the '05 Sox?

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Who would you want back from the '05 Sox?

Only two players from the 2005 White Sox remain on the team's roster heading into spring training: A.J. Pierzynski and Paul Konerko.

CSN's Chuck Garfien asked the pair of champions who they would like to have back from that 2005 team. Of course, both would probably be okay with Mark Buehrle, and their responses weren't meant to slight anybody. But both responses serve as interesting.

Konerko told Garfien he would go with Juan Uribe as someone who would be good for the team and be fun to hang around again.

"He'd probably be both, but I got to have him around at all times if I could," Konerko said. "He's just a great teammate and a fun guy to have around.

"When you ask players questions like that, we never think about how he'd help the team. We only think of guys you want on the team and hang around with. Jon Garland would be up there."

Garfien then jokingly asked Konerko about Carl Everett, to which the first baseman responded:

"Carl would be the guy as far as helping the team because Carl was a great help to that team. He was a mean guy out there. I think his attitude kind of caught on with everybody else, so he might be a guy you bring back. We became a better team when he came on as far as our killer instinct. When Carl was between the lines he was a mean individual, which was good."

As for Pierzynski, he went a different direction.

"Everyone expects me to say Rowand just because we are still very good friends," Pierzynski said. "I think I'd probably go with someone who had a career year like a Neal Cotts or Cliff Politte just because what they did for that one year when they were so good for that one whole year and then the post-season. It's cool to see how guys can have that one year where everything comes together and it works out and it leads to something special in the end."

Personally, in terms of players I enjoyed watching, Uribe and Everett would be right up there. Uribe's cannon arm was great, as were his palms whenever he really connected with a pitch. And Everett was just a bad dude on the field -- the two home runs he hit against Kyle Lohse on April 18, 2005, stand out in my mind.

So who would you like to have back? Let us know in the comments and vote in the poll. We're excluding Buehrle, because realistically, no other player would have a shot in a poll against him. So think of it as "player other than Buehrle" poll.

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Todd Frazier wasn’t pleased with a call Saturday afternoon that led to the first ejection of his career.

It’s not that the White Sox third baseman is arguing about whether or not he deserved to get thrown out in the seventh inning of a 10-2 loss to the Oakland A’s. Frazier is more miffed by first-base umpire Sam Holbrook’s initial ruling --- that his throw pulled Jose Abreu off the bag --- and the determination by replay officials that the call was correct.

Frazier was ejected shortly after word arrived that the call stands, which means officials in New York didn’t believe they have enough evidence to overturn the original ruling. That fact bothered Frazier, who was charged with an error and began to speak his mind. White Sox manager Rick Renteria was ejected shortly thereafter for the third straight home game.

“It’s just frustrating with the technology we have today,” Frazier said. “It’s just crazy. It boggles your mind. It really does. You know -- I’m the one. I’m vocal. I’m emotional. But when it’s wrong, 100 percent wrong. I saw it on the MLB Network. I saw it in our cameras and our computers. I just don’t understand how we can see it and they can’t see it in New York. It’s just, it’s frustrating as all hell to be honest with you. It turned into a big inning. We were down a lot, don’t get me wrong. But still, Jake (Petricka) is pitching his heart out and next thing you know he gives up an unearned run and two more runs. So it’s really not that hard. Honest. It’s not that hard.”

Renteria raced onto the field in an attempt to save Frazier from a quick ejection, but didn’t have enough time. It was the third home game in a row in which a White Sox player was ejected for the first time in their career. Tim Anderson got the boot on Friday night after he argued with plate umpire Jim Wolf. And Avisail Garcia got tossed from the June 15 series finale against the Baltimore Orioles.

Renteria said taking into context who his players are and their track record made him want to further defend their actions.

“I don't ever go into a situation arguing with someone to get thrown out,” Renteria said. “I don't. I think what happens is, like anybody emotionally, when you start talking and expressing yourself, you have a tendency to get heated. You don't plan on doing that. I certainly don't go out there planning on having that happen. I think what happens, and I think it's just human nature, you start thinking about the whole situation, you're losing a player. You're losing a guy that's supposed to be in there for the next two, three innings to help you maybe continue to chip away. Our team has been fighting every day, since day one of spring training. I don’t care what our record is, I don't care what the score is, we fight. And when you take one of those pieces out of the lineup, you get pissed.”

Even though he had a chance to cool off, Frazier still felt the same after the contest. He stuck his head into the team’s video room after the game to check out the play. Teams have a variety of angles from which they can determine whether or not to challenge a call. They also have the option of taking a freeze frame and magnifying the picture, which left no doubt in Frazier’s mind that the call was incorrect.

“Like I said just frustrating,” Frazier said. “It’s just not that hard. And with all the technology like I said, I don’t mean to repeat ourselves, but with all the technology and 8 different angles it’s just one of those things where I just can’t let that go. It turned into a huge inning. You never know. We were down 6 we coulda came back. You gotta be 100 percent. You gotta be 100 percent right on that and I really don’t think he was.”