Wrapping up day 2 of SoxFest

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Wrapping up day 2 of SoxFest

From SoxFest on Saturday:

Adam Dunn is ready to move on from his disastrous 2011 season, reports Chuck Garfien. It's not something he wants to talk about anymore, and he actually wasn't asked about it as much in his seminar appearance Saturday -- most fans concentrated on telling Dunn how much they supported him in addition to asking questions about his offseason regimen.

Gordon Beckham is part of the crew that includes Dunn -- and Alex Rios -- that need to have bounce-back years for the White Sox to contend, by most accounts. But Beckham says he's not going to entertain those thoughts, thus avoiding putting any added pressure on himself.

One guy who hardly needs a bounce-back year is Brent Lillibridge, who hopes to parlay his growth in 2011 into a successful 2012 and, eventually, a starting role.

It's new to Jeff Manto to be in a market in which position coaches are sought out by the fans and media. The new White Sox hitting coach spoke to CSN about that "unusual" aspect to the job, as well as the approach he's going to take to Dunn, Rios, and the rest of the team.

In a way, Kenny Williams actually welcomed the smattering of boos that greeted him during Friday's opening ceremonies, as he notes the last two times he was jeered at SoxFest -- 2004 and 2007 -- the Sox made the playoffs the next season.

Robin Ventura participated in spring training as a player for 17 seasons, but come thing spring, he'll have to coordinate his first one as a manager. Lucky for him, he has a few coaching veterans on his staff who will be instrumental in having everything run smoothly.

Ventura mentioned during a seminar that he's not going to be afraid to sit a player down, no matter who they are or what they're making. He also mentioned that he won't treat everyone the same -- like Paul Konerko vs., say, Gregory Infante -- but he will try to treat everyone fairly.

Brent Morel told CSN he was too concerned with making contact during most of 2011, but in September, he concentrating on being more selective and driving the ball. That tweak in his approach produced eight home runs and 15 walks, for what it's worth.

Rick Hahn on the perception the White Sox don't like on-base percentage: "Yeah, it's like we don't like puppy dogs, chocolate and Christmas. Everybody likes those things." Hahn also joined Buddy Bell, Doug Laumann and Nick Capra in discussing the state of the White Sox farm system, which Larry has some thoughts on after looking at Baseball America's prospect handbook.

Don Cooper doesn't like to read too much into 7 23 innings of work, but Addison Reed was impressive enough in that cup of coffee last season that Coop has him as a lock to be in the 2012 bullpen.

Discomfort sidelines White Sox infielder Brett Lawrie

Discomfort sidelines White Sox infielder Brett Lawrie

GLENDALE, Ariz. — The White Sox held Brett Lawrie out Saturday after he reported discomfort in the same left leg that sidelined him for the final 2 1/2 months of 2016.

The second baseman has been a full participant the entire spring until he informed manager Rick Renteria what he was experiencing Saturday. 

"We're going to reevaluate him tomorrow and see where he's at," Renteria said. "He didn't feel quite right, and so he was in there earlier today getting treatment. We'll reevaluate tomorrow and make a determination where we're at in terms of trying to set some parameters for how we move forward."

A confusing, tricky series of injuries that Lawrie blamed on wearing orthotics limited him to 94 games last season. He hit the disabled list on July 22 and didn't discover the cause until after the season ended. But Lawrie reported to camp feeling healthy once again and has participated at 100 percent until this point, Renteria said.

"It's been good," Renteria said. "Everything has been clean. There have been no notifications anything had been amiss. He just woke up this morning and felt it. So we're going to be very cautious, take it a day at a time, reevaluate it and see where we're at."

Zack Collins, Yoan Moncada play as White Sox fall to Dodgers

Zack Collins, Yoan Moncada play as White Sox fall to Dodgers

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Manager Rick Renteria promised before Saturday's game the prospects would play and they certainly did.

White Sox prospects Zack Collins and Yoan Moncada both entered in the fifth inning of Saturday's 5-3 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers at Camelback Ranch. Collins singled in two at-bats while Moncada, the centerpiece in the Chris Sale trade, went 0-for-2.

"It was fun," Collins said. "To be able to go out there on the first day was an honor to me. A little jittery, but very excited to play.

"I'm the new guy, it's my first year and the first game played and I get to play. It's definitely an honor."

It's a distinction that will be shared by many, Renteria said. With the White Sox focused on player development and a longer spring schedule, the prospects should get a long look. Given the club's top eight prospects — according to MLB.com — are in big league camp, many will see significant playing time early in camp.

"We've got a long spring and a lot of opportunities," Renteria said. "You're going to see a lot of our kids."

Reliever Zack Burdi, the 26th overall pick of last June's draft, is scheduled to appear in Sunday's game when the White Sox host the Rockies. The White Sox also tentatively have listed Michael Kopech and Reynaldo Lopez as the starting pitchers for their split-squad doubleheader on Tuesday. 

Collins took advantage of his first chance with a ninth-inning single off Dodgers pitcher Edward Paredes. Next up for the 2016 first-rounder is a report Monday for his teammates as part of Renteria's morning meetings.

"I have my little presentation going," Collins said. "I'll probably be more nervous than I will playing."