Bowen analyzes football: preps to pros

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Bowen analyzes football: preps to pros

Matt Bowen, you are the new owner of an NFL franchise. You have more money than Bill Gates. Who is your first hire and why? Second hire? Third?

"Quarterback," Bowen said. "I want to make sure I have a quarterback before I get a coach. You can't win in the NFL without a quarterback. Outside of Chicago, all of the coaches who were fired last week were fired because they didn't have a quarterback. You need a leader on offense and in the locker room that everyone looks up to."

Bowen was an All-State quarterback at Glenbard West, an All-Big Ten strong safety at Iowa and played for seven years in the NFL with the Rams, Packers, Redskins and Bills. Now he is football analyst for Comcast SportsNet, the National Football Post and several other media outlets.

He knows the game. He believes you didn't have to play the game to understand it. His role is to teach the game, to entertain, to show viewers and readers why it happened and how it happened, to go deeper than X's and O's and instant replay.

"I wouldn't have lasted seven years in the NFL if I didn't study. And that applies to high school, college and the pros. It's the same game," Bowen said. "I want to give fans a different and deeper perspective of the game. Some are turned on by it and some aren't. I wanted to take something from my experience."

Bowen's experience taught him that quarterback is the most important position in football, not coach or general manager or left offensive tackle or running back.

He was a very good high school quarterback. As a senior, he passed for 1,533 yards and 17 touchdowns and rushed for 1,329 yards and 17 touchdowns for a 6-4 team. Hayden Fry and one-time Heisman Trophy runner-up Chuck Long recruited him to play quarterback at Iowa. But he soon learned how good you have to be to play at the highest levels.

"I quarterbacked the scout team as a freshman," Bowen recalled. "Then I was converted to defensive back. I met with Chuck Long. He said: 'Do you want to play on Sundays? You won't do it as a quarterback.' They knew if I would be successful in college, I would be a defensive back."

Bowen is quick to point out that the best NFL teams he ever played for were led by outstanding quarterbacks--Kurt Warner, Brett Favre and Mark Brunell.

"There are only 32 quarterback jobs in the world and half of them get replaced every year," he said. "If you are in the top 16, you are special, someone who gets it done on the field."

Bowen's second hire as the new owner of an NFL franchise?

"General manager, someone who doesn't miss, a good talent evaluator, someone like Ted Thompson of the Packers or Tom Dimitroff of the Falcons," Bowen said. "Then I would tell the general manager to hire the coach that he wants. That would be my third hire."

Bowen spent time in Washington, D.C., with Redskins owner Dan Snyder, who wants to be involved in all football issues and decisions, as Jerry Jones with the Cowboys. "That isn't the way to do it," he said.

"Let the general manager hire the coach. Of course, the owner has final approval. But let the general manager do his homework and do his job. Let him decide who will fit your style and personnel.

"And let the coach hire the position coaches, the offensive and defensive coordinators. That is so important. They are gold. That's how you get better as a player, by working with the tight end coach, the offensive line coach, the defensive back coach, the special teams coach.

"And, finally, build a great training facility, the best one that your money can buy, the best there is, like Baltimore...a weight room, training room, locker room, film room, indoor practice facility."

The game has changed dramatically since Bowen was growing up in Glen Ellyn and recalling the tradition of Glenbard West football, the Bill Duchon era and Jim Covert's 1991 team that finished 10-1 and included Craig Williams, Darren Dunlap and Billy Harris. He was a three-sport athlete who thought he was a better baseball player but couldn't shake an undying passion for football.

"There was something about football...the team aspect, the game day aspect," Bowen said. "When you are born, you can hit or you can't hit. You can't teach hitting. I felt if I could hit I could compete.

"Specialization is baloney. Kids should play every sport and experience different coaching. The different movements are huge with the development of an athlete.

"Football was the thing for me. I wanted to be those guys at Glenbard West who walked down the hill. When I was a freshman, I wanted to be like the 1991 team. I wanted to be those guys.

"I knew the tradition, that it was like being a pro in Glen Ellyn, being on the varsity football team. That's what everybody wanted to be, a Hilltopper, a hitter. Playing on Duchon Field is like playing in Wrigley Field."

But what happens when it is all over, when you no longer are good enough or fast enough or young enough to play a kid's game, when an assistant coach tells you to report to the head coach and bring along your playbook? For Bowen, the release date was March 1, 2007.

"I had opportunities to continue to play," Bowen said. "At that time, my wife and I had our first of three sons, Matthew, who has Down Syndrome. He was starting therapy. Should I leave him to cover kicks for another year? It was time to do something else. There is a time when you have to start looking at your future. It was a perfect time for me to grow up and be a big boy.

"The toughest part when you hang it up is when you are thrown back into real life. It no longer is the fantasy life of pro football. The first thing you realize is you are in your 30s and you don't have a job yet. For some, it is hard to find something to do. It was an adjustment. The first NFL Sunday, when I was watching a game on TV, I was in a daze, not being part of a team."

Bowen's wife had a good game plan. "Why don't you go back to school?" she suggested. He enrolled at DePaul to study for a masters degree in journalism, specifically writing and reporting. He quickly learned that his football clippings didn't mean anything in the classroom.

"The professors don't care that you played pro football," he said. "If you don't do you work, you don't get grades. I wanted to get adjusted to life after football. It was another challenge. I wanted to be a good writer."

After obtaining his degree in 2009, Bowen has written for the Sun-Times, Tribune, National Football Post and Washington Examiner and articulated his views on many TV and radio shows, including Comcast's Chicago Tribune Live, WGN, Boers & Bernstein on WSCR.

"The game was tougher back then...high school, college and pro. They were more physical," he said. "I can understand why it isn't now with players, parents, coaches and trainers so worried about concussions. Back then, we didn't worry about it.

"And the game has changed. It is more wide open, more athletic. Offenses are multiple, creative, wild. Stuff you used to draw up in the sand is making its way into the NFL. Everybody in the NFL used to try to be Peyton Manning. But it isn't that way anymore. Now it's all about athletes...bigger, faster, stronger, leaner."

At Glenbard West, Bowen ran a veer option with two tight ends, two running backs and one wide receiver. There were three coaches on the varsity level, not 12 as is the case today.

"But some things never change," he said. "As a sophomore, I was told to hit the blocking sled. 'But I'm the quarterback,' I said. 'The whole team hits the sled,' I was told. The best teams hit. They are technicians. But looking at tackling on all levels today. It isn't what it used to be. Defenses are scared of option offenses."

Bowen relished an invitation to participate in the telecast of the Class 7A and 8A high school championships last November. When he accepted the offer, he had no idea that his alma mater would be playing in the Class 7A final. He felt like he was wearing his green and white uniform with the big G on his helmet. Once a Hilltopper, always a Hilltopper.

"It brought back a lot of memories," he said. "Mount Carmel (the Class 8A champion) ran a veer option. Their execution was so smooth. They dont make mistakes. (Quarterback) Don Butkus reminded me of Darren Dunlap, great football awareness.

"(Glenbard North's) Justin Jackson can be a Big Ten player. He reminds me of Eddie George, up and down, powerful, doesn't take a lot of hits. Glenbard West showed so much speed on defense. They are so well-coached. When you do everything right, read your keys, play at a 4.4 pace, it's like watching Notre Dame football and an SEC defense."

He still can't forget his team's 31-20 loss to Naperville Central in the opening round of the Class 6A playoff in 1994.

"It was disappointing," said Bowen, who played on two 6-4 teams. "We all look back and feel we could have done it better. There still are games I think about that bother me, like two last-second losses to Downers Grove North as a junior and senior.

"And the playoff game against Naperville Central and (Player of the Year) Tim Lavery. I threw a deep ball to Hasani Steele for a touchdown. But we lost. What could we have done differently?"

Almost 20 years later, he still is trying to figure it out.

30 Days to Kickoff: St. Viator

30 Days to Kickoff: St. Viator

CSNChicago.com preps reporter "Edgy" Tim O’Halloran spotlights 100 high school football teams in 100 days. The first 75 team profiles will focus on teams making strides across Chicagoland and elsewhere in the state. Starting Aug. 1, we’ll unveil the @CSNPreps Top 25 Power Rankings, leading up to kickoff on Friday, Aug. 26. You can view Edgy Tim's other football previews here.

School: St. Viator

Head coach: Dave Archibald

Assistant Coaches: OL Jackson King, RB Al Panzeca, WR Casey Lynde, DC/DB Dan Fitzpatrick, LB Jason Churak, DL Kyle Jenkins, Def. Assistant Bob Lamick, K-Fr. Dan Hall, DFO Mr. Mike Tubridy

How they fared in 2015: 1-8 (0-7) East Suburban Catholic Conference. St. Viator failed to qualify for the 2015 IHSA state playoff field.

Biggest storyline in 2016: Can the Lions get back to their winning ways this season?

Names to watch this season: TE Cole Kmet, LB Austin Ruetschke

Biggest holes to fill: The Lions have just four starters back on defense this fall including just one starter on the defensive line in senior Anthony Barcal.

EDGY's Early Take: New head coach Dave Archibald comes to St. Viator from Wisconsin Lutheran and can hopefully bring some new life into the Lions after struggling last season. St. Viator has experience in the offensive skills and that group be asked to produce early and often this season. 

31 Days to Kickoff: Minooka

31 Days to Kickoff: Minooka

CSNChicago.com preps reporter "Edgy" Tim O’Halloran spotlights 100 high school football teams in 100 days. The first 75 team profiles will focus on teams making strides across Chicagoland and elsewhere in the state. Starting Aug. 1, we’ll unveil the @CSNPreps Top 25 Power Rankings, leading up to kickoff on Friday, Aug. 26. You can view Edgy Tim's other football previews here.

School: Minooka

Head coach: Paul Forsythe

Assistant Coaches: Bert Kooi, Frank Yudzentis, Paige Schoolman, Matt Harding, Mic Resner

How they fared in 2015: 5-5 (3-4) Southwest Prairie Conference. Minooka made the 2015 Class 8A state playoff field and lost to Huntley in opening round action.

Biggest storyline in 2016: Can the Indians get back to the state playoffs and advance?

Names to watch this season: QB Johnny Carnagio, WR/DB Isaiah Hill

Biggest holes to fill: The Indians will need to replace their entire starting defensive line from a season ago.

EDGY's Early Take: With 13 starters back (8 offense 5 defense) from their 2015 state playoff team the Indians have high hopes this fall. The pass/catch combo of QB Carnagio to WR Hill is one of the tops in the conference. If Minooka can find a few answers up front on defense they could make a return state playoff push.

Former North Lawndale star Jonathan Mills killed in shooting

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Former North Lawndale star Jonathan Mills killed in shooting

Former local high school basketball star Jonathan Mills was shot to death on Monday in North Lawndale, a source confirmed to CSN.

A Class 2A state champion and city champion who played high school ball at North Lawndale and college basketball at Southern Miss, Mills was shot multiple times in the 4100 block of West Roosevelt at 1:27 p.m., police told the Chicago Sun-Times.

The 26-year-old Mills was pronounced dead at the scene. He is survived by two daughters. 

Mills became a West Side legend in Chicago basketball circles as one of the hardest-working rebounders the city has seen in the last decade. Taking North Lawndale to two state semifinals and winning a Class 2A state championship in 2008, the 6-foot-5 lefty wasn't particularly skilled as an undersized forward, but he was relentless in his pursuit of the ball and a rugged defender.

In his first varsity season at North Lawndale as a junior, Mills averaged 16.8 points and 13.7 rebounds per game as he led the Phoenix in rebounding 31 of 33 games during a state title run. In a Class 2A sectional title game against Englewood, Mills had a legendary performance as he had 22 points and 23 rebounds in a two-point win. 

During his senior season, Mills averaged 14 points and 13 rebounds per game in helping the Phoenix win the school's first city championship. Beating Hyde Park in overtime for the city title, Mills had 13 points and 23 rebounds in a 54-51 win as he secured the game-clinching rebound off of teammate Terry Johnson's missed free throw. 

After playing two years of junior college ball at Eastern Utah, Mills played his final two seasons of college basketball at Southern Miss in Conference USA. Mills earned third-team All-Conference USA honors as a junior while also making the All-Defensive Team as he averaged 9.5 points and 6.5 rebounds per game. During his senior year, Mills was once again on the Conference USA All-Defensive Team as he put up 9.3 points and 8.0 rebounds per game.

On Monday, Twitter was filled with memories of Mills from coaches, players and reporters that watched him play.