CSN to celebrate White Sox '70s Night' June 10

CSN to celebrate White Sox '70s Night' June 10

COMCAST SPORTSNET TO CELEBRATE WHITE SOX 70s NIGHT THIS FRIDAY, JUNE 10
70s retro-style game graphics, 70s White Sox footage, Special Guests, Harrelson & Stone to wear vintage 70s style TV sportscaster jackets, along with vintage 70s White Sox uniforms to be auctioned off on WhiteSox.com among highlights
Crack out your bell bottoms and dust off your platform shoes as Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago White Sox, gets ready to boogie for its celebration of White Sox 70s Night on Friday, June 10 beginning at 6:30 PM, exclusively on CSN. Throughout the pre-game, game and post-game, viewers can look forward to a number of special 70s-themed elements for the networks White Sox home game telecast vs. the Oakland Athletics (7:10 PM first pitch). Viewers are urged to visit CSNChicago.com to find the exact CSN channel location in their area.

The night gets underway on CSN at 6:30 PM with a special U.S. Cellular Field remote edition of Feldco White Sox Pre-Game Live hosted by Chuck Garfien and 1971 American League home run champ Beltin Bill Melton (NOTE: Melton will also toss the ceremonial first pitch in this game).

Then, at 7:10 PM on CSN, Ken Hawk Harrelson and Steve Stone (a member of the White Sox in 73, 77 & 78) will have the game call as the White Sox host the As. Immediately following the game, fans can look forward to Galaxie White Sox Post Game Live, which will also take place from U.S. Cellular Field, featuring complete post-game analysis and White Sox manager Ozzie Guillens post-game press conference (also streaming on CSNChicago.com).

Among the numerous fun-filled highlights for White Sox 70s Night on Friday, June 10 include the following on-air and online elements:

- 70s retro-style, on-air graphics will be used for the first three innings of the game
- Harrelson and Stone to don retro 70s sportscaster jackets during the game openplus, viewers can check out Hawk, Stone and Melton wearing 70s White Sox game jerseys that will be autographed and auctioned off on WhiteSox.com starting June 20 with proceeds going to White Sox Charities

- Additional in-game features include vintage 70s White Sox footage, 70s White Sox trivia, a disco ball in the production truck, plus - special surprise guests during the game

- CSNChicago.com asks viewers to use the following hashtag Sox70sNight when Tweeting comments about the game and their favorite 70s White Sox memories

- Live Twitter messages throughout the game from Chuck Garfien (@ChuckGarfien), White Sox Insider Brett Ballantini (@CSNChi_Beatnik) and @Beerleaguer_Sox

- Garfien & Ballantini to provide 70-themed White Sox blogs throughout the week on CSNChicago.com featuring stories on the 77 South Side Hit Men, Disco Demolition Night in 79 and more!

Bullard a prime example of how, why and where Bears can improve

Bullard a prime example of how, why and where Bears can improve

This Bears rebuild has taken longer than expected. Ideally, in year three of a GM/head coach tandem, they should be contending for the playoffs. 

That’s not to say the 2017 Bears can’t. It’s just unlikely. They don’t have enough players opponents have to gameplan for. They don’t have the depth to overcome key injuries. When franchises get on a winning roll, it’s when they have enough of those studs on both sides of the ball, and have the depth to avoid as many emergencies as possible. And that happens when second- and third-year players make a jump in their play.

Offensively, we saw an impressive jump by Cam Meredith, but another left leg injury still have us wondering exactly what Kevin White is, and how good he can be. Jeremy Langford’s growth was stunted by his ankle injury. Second-year center Hroniss Grasu missed the entire year. On the defensive side, we never got to see if Kyle Fuller could’ve proven his first-round status in his third year. Safety Adrian Amos started another full season, but is now in a battle to do the same a third straight year. We can see star qualities in Eddie Goldman, but how much of a difference-maker can he be by remaining on the field? We’ll learn the same about Leonard Floyd if he can do that this fall. And there are a handful of other second-year players we’ll be watching, from Deon Bush to Deiondre Hall to Cre’Von LeBlanc. There’s also 2016 third-round pick Jonathan Bullard, who learned what it took to become a 3-4 defensive end in the NFL.

“It was okay. I got about 17 snaps a game,” Bullard said of his rookie season during last month’s minicamp. “That’s not what I wanted coming in. But it is what is. I want to move on to the next year and hopefully be able to help this team in a big way.”

Rookie seasons for every player lay the groundwork. How high their ceiling goes starts to get established in year two, between the player’s effort, and getting coached-up correctly.

“They asked me to gain a few pounds. I was like 282 last year, and right now I’m at 296, so hopefully that helps me, said Bullard. “I’m just trying to make all this solid and not lose my burst that got me here. So I’m looking forward to it. I got a year under my belt now, I know what they expect. I’m gonna be ready.”

Part of Bullard taking things upon himself was hooking up with a former defensive end, from the same alma mater, who happens to be fourth in franchise history in sacks (albeit in a 4-3 scheme): CSN’s very own Bears analyst, Alex Brown.

“We saw each other at the Florida spring game and we kind of linked up and put in some work at his facility down the road,” Bullard explained. “We’ve met up quite a few times, just working on little things. He’s just trying to give me a better understanding of the game, and some of the veteran things he knows that I want to incorporate into my game.”

So what kind of a teacher is Alex?

“He’s alright. I make him him jump in there. I tell him he’s not that old.”

And while Pace didn’t make the big splash in free agency as he tries to match up salary with his grades for players, Bullard has to prove he’s now better than last year’s starter, Mitch Unrein, as well as a hungry fellow former Gator, Jaye Howard, who was brought in on a “prove it” one-year deal after being cut just before the draft by Kansas City.

“As far as him being a Gator, it’s exciting. But it’s a competition. He’s gonna come in and try to win the starting job, and I’m gonna do the same. It’s just gonna have to be a friendly competition when training camp comes, and may the best man win.”

Let this, and many other Bourbonnais battles, begin.

Kyle Hendricks is back, but Cubs will likely have to wait for their next shot at Yu Darvish

Kyle Hendricks is back, but Cubs will likely have to wait for their next shot at Yu Darvish

Within the first several weeks of the Theo Epstein administration, the Cubs finished second in the Yu Darvish sweepstakes, though nowhere close to the $51.7 million the Texas Rangers bid for the exclusive rights to negotiate a six-year, $60 million deal with the Japanese superstar.

The Cubs will probably have to wait a few more months for their next shot at Darvish, who is “unlikely to move” before the July 31 trade deadline, a source monitoring the situation said Monday. Darvish means enough to the franchise’s bottom line as a box-office draw and magnet for corporate sponsors that the Rangers would be reluctant to trade a player with global appeal and potentially jeopardize that relationship heading into free agency this winter.

Beyond the possible impact on re-signing Darvish, that would also mean foreclosing on a season where Texas is only 2.5 games out of an American League wild-card spot, making this final week critical to the buy-or-sell decision.

The Cubs would obviously prefer to stay out of the rental market after shipping two top prospects to the White Sox in the Jose Quintana deal. Quintana’s reasonable contract – almost $31 million between next season and 2020 once two team options are picked up – creates financial flexibility for a free-agent megadeal (Darvish?) or the next big-time international player.

But the cost of doing business with the White Sox probably means the Cubs wouldn’t have the super-elite prospect to anchor a trade for Darvish, anyway. That would be another obstacle in any possible deal for Sonny Gray, with an AL source saying the New York Yankees are going hard after the Oakland A’s right-hander (and have a deeper farm system and a greater sense of urgency after missing on Quintana).

All that means Kyle Hendricks could function as the trade-deadline addition for the rotation, with the Cubs instead trying to shorten games and deepen their bullpen by July 31.

After spending more than six weeks on the disabled list, the Cubs activated Hendricks for the start of this week’s crosstown series, watching him pitch into the fifth inning of Monday’s 3-1 loss to a White Sox team that had lost nine straight games.

[Willson Contreras may be ‘the f------ Energizer Bunny,’ but Cubs still need to get another catcher before trade deadline]

Hendricks is a rhythm/feel pitcher who blossomed from an overlooked prospect in the Texas system into a piece in the buzzer-beater Ryan Dempster deal at the 2012 deadline into last year’s major-league ERA leader.

Hendricks clearly isn’t locked in yet. He gave up eight hits, but minimized the damage against the White Sox, allowing only one run while putting up five strikeouts against zero walks.

“He wasn’t as normal,” manager Joe Maddon said. “The velocity was still down a little bit. There was not a whole lot of difference between his pitches. He was not what you would call ‘on.’ He would be the first one to tell you that. He looked fine delivery-wise, but the ball just wasn’t coming out as normal.”

Hendricks described his fastball command as “terrible,” called his secondary pitches “OK” and ultimately came to this conclusion: “Health-wise, everything felt great, so we’ll take that. Just got to get back (to my routine).”

The biggest takeaway is Hendricks didn’t feel any lingering effects from the right hand tendinitis that was initially classified as a minor injury in early June. Meaning the Cubs (51-47) are just about at full strength and have another week left to upgrade the defending World Series champs.