CSN & CSNChicago.com to go 'Behind the Lens' for Blackhawks-Stars telecast

CSN & CSNChicago.com to go 'Behind the Lens' for Blackhawks-Stars telecast

COMCAST SPORTSNET & CSNCHICAGO.COM TO GO BEHIND THE LENS FOR TOMORROW NIGHTS CHICAGO BLACKHAWKS TELECAST

Network to provide a unique, behind-the-scenes look at what goes on at the United Center on game day, along with the necessary preparationsexecution for a game telecast on Comcast SportsNet;

CSNChicago.com to provide a live videoaudio stream from inside Comcast SportsNets Blackhawks remote production truck

Chicago, IL (February 22, 2012) Comcast SportsNet, the television home for the most games and most comprehensive coverage of the Chicago Blackhawks, will provide fans with a unique, behind-the-scenes viewing experience for Thursday nights (Feb. 23) Blackhawks vs. Dallas Stars telecast from the United Center (7:30 PM game time start).

This special evening of Blackhawks hockey on Comcast SportsNet, entitled Blackhawks: Behind the Lens, gives fans a chance to see numerous elements of exactly what takes place and how much work goes into a putting together a Blackhawks game at the United Center. Blackhawks: Behind the Lens will showcase everything, including what goes into a preparing and executing a Comcast SportsNet Blackhawks telecast to what happens in the Blackhawks locker room, trainers room, equipment room and much more.

In addition, Comcast SportsNets newly-enhanced website, CSNChicago.com, will provide viewers with a live videoaudio stream from inside the network remote production truck, featuring live commentary from producer Mike Leary and director Dave Turner. Fans can also interact throughout the night utilizing the Twitter hashtag CSNHawks.

Plus Comcast SportsNet and CSNChicago.com will provide additional, behind-the-scenes video features throughout the evening, including the following highlights:
PRE-GAME COACHES MEETING: A unique opportunity to watch a Blackhawks coaches meeting prior to the game

LOCKER ROOMEQUIPMENT ROOM GAME DAY PREP: Watch how Blackhawks staffers get the Blackhawks locker room ready for a game, including stick preparations, skate sharpening, jersey hanging & more

EDDIE OLCZYKTELESTRATOR: Eddie O will provide fans with a up-close look at how he uses the Telestrator during the course of a game and the elements he looks for that are vital components to key plays in the game

TIME LAPSE: Experience the amazing change-over from Wed nights Bulls game to Thu nights Blackhawks game

PRESS BOX: Blackhawks Insider Tracey Myers to show viewers what its like covering a game from the UC press box

SCOREBOARD OPERATIONS: Well take you inside the United Center scoreboard control room to hear from the crew who deliver the best scoreboard presentation in the league

PUBLIC ADDRESS ANNCR. GENE HONDA: Well visit with the golden-voiced Gene Honda, whose thrilling in-stadium goal-scoring announcements after the Blackhawks score have become synonymous with a game at the UC

SCOREBOARD OPERATIONS: Well take you inside the United Center scoreboard control room to hear from the crew who delivers the best scoreboard presentation in the league

Fast Break Morning Update: Blackhawks win in Minnesota

Fast Break Morning Update: Blackhawks win in Minnesota

Here are some of Tuesday's top stories in Chicago sports:

Wednesday on CSN: Illinois State and Loyola host in Valley doubleheader

Jonathan Toews has five-point night, including a hat trick, in Blackhawks' win over Wild

Report: Bears seeking trade partners for Jay Cutler

Bulls Talk Podcast: What is the Bulls' approach at the trade deadline?

MLB commissioner Rob Manfred open to idea of Cubs hosting All-Star Game at renovated Wrigley Field

White Sox Talk Podcast: 1-on-1 with executive vice president Ken Williams

Northwestern's offense nowhere to be found as Illini complete sweep of season series

Quick Hits: Blackhawks respond the right way in win over Wild

Under-the-radar Reynaldo Lopez impressing White Sox: 'He's got some stuff'

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

Why Joe Maddon won’t tone down the stunts at Cubs camp

Why Joe Maddon won’t tone down the stunts at Cubs camp

MESA, Ariz. – Joe Maddon teased reporters when pitchers and catchers reported to Arizona one week ago, promising the Cubs wouldn't tone down the gimmicks now that they're World Series champions: "We already have something planned for the first day that you might not want to miss."

A weekend of rain in Mesa postposed the first full-scale full-squad workout until Monday, and the wet grass meant the big reveal had to wait until Tuesday morning, when gonzo strength and conditioning coordinator Tim Buss drove a white Ferrari onto the field for the team's stretching session.

The bearded man they call "Bussy" rocked sunglasses, a gold chain around his neck, brown dress shoes and the same navy blue windowpane suit he wore to the White House. The overarching message as Buss blew kisses and Cypress Hill's "(Rock) Superstar" and Jay Z's "Big Pimpin'" blasted from the sound system: Humility.

"I hope everyone gets the sarcasm involved," Maddon said.

So, uh, no, the Cubs aren't going to dial it back or turn the zoo animals away or worry about the target they proudly wore on their chest last year.

"I don't know if the mime's coming back or not," Maddon said during the welcome-to-camp press conference. "Could you do a mime two years in a row? I don't know if that's permissible under MLB rules somewhere. I don't think you can bring a mime back two years in a row.

"Magicians are OK. You can anticipate a lot of the same, absolutely."

Before rolling your eyes at a star manager who loves the spotlight, it's important to note that the stunts are largely Buss productions.

"A lot of times, I'm not even aware," Maddon said. "He just knows he's got my blessings. He knows he does not have to clear it with me, unless it's absolutely insane. It works pretty well this way."

While every Maddon dress-up theme trip doesn't get universal love in the clubhouse, Buss has a unique way of getting millionaires to pay attention, almost tricking them into doing work.

"He's got several well-endowed players on the team that support his histrionics," Maddon said.

[MORE CUBS: MLB commissioner Rob Manfred open to idea of Cubs hosting All-Star Game at renovated Wrigley Field]

Since taking over this job in 2001, Buss has survived multiple ownership structures (Tribune Co., Sam Zell, Ricketts family) and the Andy MacPhail/Jim Hendry/Theo Epstein transitions in the front office, working for managers Don Baylor, Rene Lachemann (interim), Bruce Kimm (interim), Dusty Baker, Lou Piniella, Mike Quade, Dale Sveum and Rick Renteria.

"He must have some good photographs, right?" Maddon said. "He's a different cat. He's a weapon."

Buss can clearly get along with almost any kind of personality. But it took Maddon – and the explosion of social media – to give him this kind of platform.

"No, nothing's changed, man," Maddon said. "It's all the same in regards to 'the same,' meaning the methods, the process. I just got aired out by one of our geek guys for not using the word ‘process.’ It’s true. Last year, I used the word ‘process’ often. I’m going to continue to use it a lot again this year.

"Why were we able to withstand the word 'pressure' and 'expectations' as well as we did last year? Because we weren't outcome-oriented. We were more oriented towards the process. Anybody in your job and your business – if you want to be outcome-oriented – you're going to find yourself in a lot of trouble just focusing on that word.

"It's all about the process. Our process shall remain the same, absolutely it shall. Hopefully, we're going to add or augment it in some ways that can be even more interesting and entertaining."

The irony is that the Cubs have repeatedly used outcome-based thinking in defending Maddon's decisions during the World Series. But the manager obviously deserves so much credit for creating an environment where this team could play loose and relaxed and not collapse under the weight of franchise history.

"Our guys are pretty much in charge of the whole thing," Maddon said. "I love the empowerment of the players. I love that they feel the freedom to be themselves. If they didn't, maybe Jason (Heyward) would not have gotten the guys together in a weight room in Cleveland after a bad moment.

"All those things matter. And you can't understand exactly which is more important than the other. So you just continue to attempt to do a lot of the same things. Process is important, man, and we're going to continue along that path."