How Joe Maddon and the Cubs inspired Clemson coach Dabo Swinney

How Joe Maddon and the Cubs inspired Clemson coach Dabo Swinney

Joe Maddon and the Cubs may have a hand in another championship.

As Clemson gets set for a rematch with Alabama in the college football national championship game Monday night, Tigers coach Dabo Swinney reflected on a day he spent at Wrigley Field that changed the course of his season.

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Swinney and Clemson assistant coaches Brent Venables and Marion Hobby were in Chicago for the NFL Draft in April and decided to check out a Cubs game.

Swinny explains the rest:


This is a true story. Joe Maddon would kill me for saying this because we've kind of become buddies and we text a little bit.

But I called my agent and I said, 'Hey, man, we're going up to the Draft' and I said, 'Would you happen to know anybody that could maybe get me and Venables and Hobby some tickets to the Cubs game?' He goes, 'Well, I know Joe Maddon.' And I go, 'Who's Joe Maddon?' He went, 'He's the manager.' I go, 'That's a pretty good guy to know.' 

So Joe Maddon hooked us up with [Cubs traveling secretary Vijay Tekchandani] and so we ended up going in. So there was this rain delay. Next thing I know, Vijay gave us a tour, and then he takes us into the locker room and I really didn't know many of these guys, but as it turns out, man, these guys are huge football fans.

Jon Lester comes right up to me and they're all like, 'Hey coach, how are you doing?' And Jon Lester's wife is a Clemson grad and he's from Georgia. Just kind of sat around and talked to all those guys. It was really neat to meet him. That shortstop [Addison Russell], he looked like my son. He was like this young kid and watching those guys get ready for the game. What's that pitcher's name? Arrieta? Arrieta was on the mound but he was off doing Zen somewhere getting ready.

So there's this rain delay, not sure if they're going to play, so I'm walking around, I've got a chance to kind of see the culture there and I was like, "Man, this is really cool. These guys are loose, they know they've got a good team.' And so I ended up going around and they take me to meet Joe. So I go meet Joe and I walk in his office and he's got his baseball pants on and he's got this shirt on that says 'Try Not to Suck' and I'm like, he's big. I'm like, this is Joe Maddon.

So we talked for a minute and he's like, 'Hey man, I watched your team and watched you guys last year' and we kind of have an instant connection. It was really neat. I told him, 'You need to know this' because I had met his players and been around, 'You guys have a great culture. I'm telling you, you've got a winning culture here. You've got a good - just feel - in this building. You can smell it.'

They knew they had the best team and I think they embraced that. They embraced that. Don't run from that. It kind of resonated with me and when I came back and I kind of got off this summer and had a little time, that was one of the things I came back and I told the guys Day 1: 'Listen, everybody has been telling us we're this target. Well, we are the target, but let's embrace that. For us at Clemson, best is the standard. So if Clemson is the target, best is the standard. So let's focus on being the best we can be. Let's be committed to that and let's embrace that. Let's run right to it.'

Our guys bought into that and then I've always told the guys, my message has already been, 'Hey, don't lose to Clemson. If we don't lose to Clemson, we've got a chance here.'

(h/t Chicago Sun-Times for the photo)

That is some story, and crazy how connected the sports world is.

Also, Swinney's story is rife with awesome little nuggets, like how he didn't know who Joe Maddon was and how Arrieta was "off doing Zen somewhere" before his start.

Just more proof the 2016 Cubs will be remembered forever.

Catch a glimpse inside 'The Cousin Eddie,' Joe Maddon's tricked-out RV

Catch a glimpse inside 'The Cousin Eddie,' Joe Maddon's tricked-out RV

We finally have a full glimpse inside the "Cousin Eddie."

Joe Maddon's luxury RV has been name-dropped ever since before the celebrity manager became embedded forever in Cubs lore.

Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer tell the story about sitting with Maddon down in Pensacola, Fla., outside the "Cousin Eddie" as the trio discussed Maddon coming to manage the Cubs.

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Maddon has since mentioned the RV several times as his offseason oasis.

Nearly two-and-a-half years later, we can now catch a glimpse inside the "Cousin Eddie" as Maddon was recently profiled on "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel:"

The pimped-out RV has four TVs, a fireplace, heated floors, a sweet kitchen with a regular-sized fridge and on and on.

His RV is better than most apartments in Chicago.

Essentially, it's good to be Joe Maddon.

The Maddon profile airs Tuesday night on HBO at 9 p.m. CT.

Check out a full trailer:

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

For more than a decade, Cubs fans probably thought Sammy Sosa could walk on water.

They weren't alone in that respect.

In a recent tell-all interview with Chuck Wasserstrom, Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ being accused of being a witch when the Cubs icon was asked about being accused of PEDs.

"Chuck, it’s like Jesus Christ when he came to Jerusalem," Sosa says. "Everybody thought Jesus Christ was a witch (laughing) – and he was our savior. So if they talk (poop) about Jesus Christ, what about me?"

Talk about a God complex.

It's been 10 years since Sosa last suited up in the big leagues — and 13 years since his Cubs career ended — but the slugger is still just as polarizing as ever in the candid interview. Wasserstrom was let go by Theo Epstein and the Cubs in 2012 after spending 24 years in the organization in the media relations and baseball information departments.

[RELATED - Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture]

Sosa talks a lot about his pride and it's very clear from his answers about coming back to Chicago and being a part of the current Cubs product that his pride is a major factor steering his ship even still.

He even drops a line in there:

"When nobody knew who Chicago was, I put Chicago on the map."

I'm not sure exactly what he means by that, to be honest. I would venture almost everybody in the world knew what Chicago was before 1992. It is the third biggest city in America.

If he means the Cubs, well, the Cubs were Lovable Losers and a draw for so many people well before Sosa got there. 

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Of course, Sosa did do some absolutely incredible things for the Cubs and the entire game of baseball. Many believe he and Mark McGwire helped put baseball on the map again in a resurgent 1998 season that helped make the strike of 1994/95 an afterthought. Count me among that group, as well.

He deserves all the credit in the world. People would show up to Wrigley just to see Sosa run out to the right field bleachers and camera bulbs flashed by the thousands every single time he came up to the plate for the better part of a decade. Waveland was sometimes so packed with ballhawks that there wouldn't be room to walk.

I also agree wholeheartedly with Sosa when he says, "you're never going to see the show Mark [McGwire] and I put on [again]." He's right. That was an event that transfixed the nation and will absolutely be something I tell my kids and grandkids and — hopefully — my greatgrandkids about.

Sosa continued to push the onus of any possible reunion with the Cubs on the orgainzation, saying he would absolutely say "yes" if they ever extended an invite to join Wrigley Field.

But he wants to do it "in style."

"If one day they want to do something, I want to do it in style. If it’s going to happen, it’s got to be the right way. Don’t worry, one day they’re going to do it. I’m not in a rush.”

Sosa also said he would rather have all the money — he earned more than $124 million in his career — than be in the Hall of Fame.

Go read the entire interview with Wasserstrom. It's as transparent as you'll see Sosa, especially nowadays.