Game slips out of Starlin Castros hands

Game slips out of Starlin Castros hands
April 26, 2011, 2:58 am
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Monday, April 25, 2011
Posted: 9:55 p.m. Updated: 11:50 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

The Cubs watch Starlin Castro and see their shortstop get to balls they havent touched in years. His range and instincts are supposed to be that good.

And Castros offensive production has been so blinding that youve missed some of his defensive flaws this month. But it was impossible to ignore during the second inning of Monday nights 5-3 loss to the Colorado Rockies.

It began when Castro bobbled a ground ball that didnt seem like a big deal. The Cubs were already out to a 3-0 lead and had Matt Garza on the mound.

The conditions were perfect for a Big Ten football game. It was 43 degrees at first pitch and at certain points it was raining sideways. With runners on first and third and one out, Castro charged another ball and fumbled it on the handoff from his glove.

The ball was kind of wet, Castro said through an interpreter. I was trying to make the play. It was one of those things.

The next batter, Chris Iannetta, chopped one toward short and Castro tried to get the out at second base. His throw sailed wide to Darwin Barneys left, bouncing all the way into the bullpen in right-field foul territory, allowing two more unearned runs to score to tie the game.

Hes going to learn to play on tougher fields like this in these kinds of conditions, manager Mike Quade said. If youre in a hurry with a wet pig, youre in trouble.

You take a minute maybe you dont get to turn a double play. You make sure you get one. They dont have weather like this in the Dominican very often, so (its) another learning experience, but we got to get better (and) its got to happen pretty soon.

On the next play, Castro drew mock cheers from the crowd at Wrigley Field by making a routine throw to get the second out. His three errors marked the most for a Cub in a single inning since Jamie Navarro in 1996.

The Cubs grade on a curve because Castro is 21 years old, the youngest player in the majors.

But it didnt take long for the fans to turn on Castro, who got booed last May during his Wrigley Field debut. He committed three errors that night, but the breaking point was when he casually walked after a ball that skipped past him into shallow left field.

That got Castro called into Lou Piniellas office. Quade benched Castro for a few games last September as a response to some mental lapses, but has repeatedly praised his young shortstops maturity.

The Cubs didnt want to overwhelm Castro with leadoff responsibilities, but he excelled there so quickly (23-for-46) that hes getting more and more at-bats as the No. 3 hitter in the lineup.

Castro woke up on Monday tied for the major-league lead in hits with 35 and soon enough the All-Star buzz will start building.

This didnt seem to be as careless. It was just another reminder that at times Castro will have to slow the game down, even when everything else in his life is moving so fast.

Barney grew up as a shortstop in Oregon playing in the rain all the time. If Castro is who the Cubs project him to be, then he will have to get used to April in Chicago for years to come.

He did the best he could. (Thats) just how it goes, Barney said. He made the plays after that (and) showed some maturity there.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.