(Even More) 5 Questions with...Steve Dahl

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(Even More) 5 Questions with...Steve Dahl

CSN Chicago Senior Director of Communications
CSNChicago.com Contributor

Want to know more about your favorite Chicago media celebrities? CSNChicago.com has your fix as we put the citys most popular personalities on the spot with everyones favorite local celeb feature entitled 5 Questions with...

On Wednesdays, exclusively on CSNChicago.com, its our turn to grill the local media and other local VIPs with five random sports and non-sports related questions that will definitely be of interest to old and new fans alike.

This weeks guestHeeees Baaaacck!...and back by popular demand for his third 5 Questions with interview no lesshes a Chicago broadcasting legend, podcasting pioneer, innovator, trendsetter, etcthat list can go on foreverfans can catch him hosting the 24th annual Comcast SportsNet Sports Awards benefiting the March of Dimes on February 13 LIVE on Comcast SportsNet (coverage begins at 7:00 PM)theres just no one like him (and thats a good thing!)here are EVEN MORE 5 Questions withSTEVE DAHL!

BIO: Steve Dahl was raised in the sand, surf and sun of Southern California that has inspired so many musicians, artists and comedians. From his first taste of broadcasting at a local underground station, Steve was drawn to broadcasting and knew he wanted to share his voice and thoughts with the world. At the age of 16, Steve dropped out of high school to work full-time at the station and it was here that his 40 plus year of entertaining began.

Steve got his first morning show gig in Detroit in 1975 and his popularity skyrocketed. His everyman approach to comedy drew all kinds of people towards him. His immediate likability and the ratings of his show led to him being lured to Chicago and a bigger market. He moved to Chicago and adopted the city and its people as his own. Steve was an immediate fixture in the radio, television, sports and comedy worlds in Chicago. Disco Demolition, in July 1979, was a radio promotion that turned into an iconic event that landed Steve on the national radar. Steve teamed up with Garry Meier and the two skyrocketed to the head of the class in Chicago radio. With antics like airing his own vasectomy to shows like Greetings from Graceland, Steve constantly was ahead of his time. Steve and Garry eventually parted ways, but their mark on comedy and broadcasting is still influencing new talent today.

Called the Founder of Modern FM Talk Radio, Steves career has influenced countless other comedians and broadcasters. Steve has always been able to see ahead of his own time and be the first to try new ideas and technology. For this reason, in 2009, Steve chose to begin working with a new medium, podcasts. Podcasting allowed his listeners access to his show and daily antics whenever and wherever they would like to listen.

In August 2011, Steve began offering his show as a subscription-based podcast. As one of the first podcasters to adopt this model, Steve is once again paving the way by introducing this model as the future of broadcasting. Steve and his show, the DahlCast, have never sounded better. Not bound by corporate radio structure, Steve is able to operate an uncensored, commercial-free daily show that gives his listeners pure, unadulterated Dahl-style entertainment. With guests that include local Chicago sports and media personalities, comedians, writers and television personalities, Steves listeners are treated to a different slice of Steves life every day. In December 2011, Steve brought fellow Chicago radio personality, Kevin Matthews, into his family of podcasts and created the Steve Dahl Network. The network continues to grow and will announce more shows in early 2012. As it turns out, Chicago also has sand, surf and sun, and ironically, Steve Dahl has once again gone underground as he does his daily show from his basement.

1) CSNChicago.com: Steve, thanks for coming back for your third 5 Questions with interview. With the first two being such big hits, which has provided our readers with even more insight into your always-entertaining thoughts, a third interview was inevitable. On to the questionsback in the fall, you made a well-publicized decision to forgo heading back to terrestrial radio and further concentrate all efforts on your successful podcasting empire, but at a monthly cost to your listeners. Has the subscription model youve created lived up to your expectations so far and, if not, what plans do you have to bring in those longtime fans that may be skeptical at the moment of listening to you via the pay route?
Dahl: So far, things have gone pretty much as I had expected. We have a very good core of subscribers, so I know it works. Getting the word out to those fans who have stopped listening to the radio because of the either their schedule or the fact that it sucks is my 1 priority. Podcasting is the perfect medium for personality. There are no commercials and no restrictions on content. I am actually putting EXACTLY what I want to say out there every day for 90 minutes to two hours. It's also way easier and accessible than it sounds. There are so many ways to listen, and as a fan, you don't miss anything. With our Steve Dahl Show app, you can even listen at 2X speed. It takes out all of my dramatic pauses, but it's a very efficient way to listen to the show.

2) CSNChicago.com: I know I speak for thousands upon thousands of your fans saying that it is just absolutely ridiculous that youre not in the National Radio Hall of Fame. Does it ever bother you that youre not in there or does it even matter to you since you and your fans know what youve brought to the industry over all these years?

Dahl: Not really. I guess it used to a little bit when the nomination was handed out by their Board of Directors, but now that they have fans vote, it seems like a stupid radio contest. I am not going to hound people to put me into the HOF. Imagine if getting into Cooperstown was done by popular vote and the player had to solicit himself to get the votes. It's ludicrous and embarrassing. At this point, it's more fun to be excluded than it is to be in it. I like making fun of it. BTW: There is a Disco Demolition exhibit in the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame, so that's good enough for me.

3) CSNChicago.com: Checking out your tweets during the premiere airing of the Lifetime movie biopic Drew Peterson: Untouchable was pricelessbut that actor who portrayed you, yikes! As someone who has interviewed Peterson numerous times before he headed to prison, what did you think of Rob Lowes portrayal of himand what was your immediate reaction when you saw the guy attempting to portray you?

Dahl: I thought that Rob Lowe was spectacular as Drew Peterson, and having met Drew, I feel that Rob really captured he creep factor. I really wish that CBS Radio had let me go through with The Win a Date with Drew bit. I would have been able to get a lot of good publicity for myself (which they always failed to provide) and I NEVER would have sent anybody on a date with him. It would have been a chance to cross-examine him a little bit, maybe get him angry and see a different side of his personality.

Ultimately, CBS didn't trust me, and they forced me to say that it was all a joke, and that I was never really going to do it. It wasn't. I could have really done something memorable with it, but they chickened out. As for the guy who portrayed me, if I sounded like that, I would ask that somebody put a gun in my mouth and blow my brains out.

4) CSNChicago.com: As one of our citys biggest White Sox fans, weve seen a lot of changes this off-season on the southsidenone bigger than Ozzie Guillen taking his talents to South Beach and fan favorite Robin Ventura taking over as the teams new manager. What are your expectations for the Sox this season?

Dahl: I like Robin and I think he will be a good manager. He knows baseball and he seems like he'll be able to keep things in the clubhouse on an even keel. What more experience do you need than that? I think that will be good for the team. If Dunn and Rios can get it together, I still think the Sox have a pretty good team. I will miss Buehrle though.

5) CSNChicago.com: Congrats again to you and your wife Janet on the birth of your first grandchild over the summer. Many people have said becoming a first-time grandparent is even more fulfilling than becoming a first-time parent. Would you agree?

Dahl: I have to say that I was reticent to wear the Grandfather mantle, but it has been really fun so far. Henry seems to like me, and soon I'll be wearing diapers and eating strained food, so I feel that we relate on that level as well.

BONUS QUESTIONCSNChicago.com: We couldnt be happier that youll be back hosting the annual Comcast SportsNet Sports Awards benefiting the March of Dimes (Feb. 13 at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers) for a record FIFTH-STRAIGHT year (look out Billy Crystal). Your support over all these years couldnt be more appreciated. Any insight to what attendees and viewers at home can expect from you this year? Do tellso we can alert management as soon as possible.

Dahl: Im going to go all Ricky Gervais on everybody, so be ready for that.

Dahl LINKS

Official Steve Dahl website

Subscribe to Dahl.coms Dahlcasts

Steve Dahl on iTunes

Steve Dahl on Facebook

Steve Dahl on Twitter

24th annual Comcast SportsNet Sports Awards

View from the Moon: Bears make statement in taking tight end while passing on defensive backs

View from the Moon: Bears make statement in taking tight end while passing on defensive backs

With their second pick in the 2017 draft, the Bears addressed offense and did it in a way that, when coupled with one of their main offseason moves, makes for some very interesting what-ifs for the upcoming season.

The choice at No. 45 was tight end Adam Shaheen, who at 6-foot-6 and 278 pounds becomes the second significant addition at the position following the signing of Dion Sims (6-foot-4, 270 pounds) to a three-year deal. In a sometimes over-specialized NFL, the Bears have brought in not one but two every-down tight ends.

“Yeah, that’s accurate,” general manager Ryan Pace said. “So it opens up a lot of possibilities for our offense.”

The acquisitions of Shaheen and Sims hold some intrigue, if only because of sheer bulk, because the inescapable conclusion with the commitments to big tight ends is that the Bears might be serious about running the football. They ran 28.4 percent of their 2016 plays in personnel packages of two or three tight ends or with a tight end and fullback.

Under coordinator Dowell Loggains the Bears ran the football just 39.3 percent of the time in 2016. Head coach John Fox and Loggains cite the Bears’ frequent need to play catch-up as the reason why, though in 12 of the 16 games the Bears were tied, led or were within seven points at halftime. In fairness to Fox and Loggains, the Bears in fact arguably did not have the physical firepower at tight end to sustain a smash-mouth base of operations.

That said, both Shaheen and Sims also have a fully formed receiver side to their games, which is where the bigger-picture interest lies. Shaheen had 122 receptions over his last two seasons at Ashland. Sims caught 36, 25 and 35 passes in his final three years with the Miami Dolphins. Both Shaheen and Sims were high school basketball standouts; Shaheen played a year of basketball at the University of Pittsburgh-Johnstown, while Sims was dual-recruited for football and basketball at Michigan State after finishing fourth in voting for Mr. Basketball in Michigan in 2009.

“I definitely think (the basketball stuff) helps,” Pace said. “Half the time, it’s like these tight ends are going up for a rebound and boxing out. And (Shaheen) definitely has it. When we talk about body control and catching radius, the ball is not always going to be on target. And Adam has the ability to do that. We confirmed that through the tape, and Frank (Smith, tight ends coach) was able to confirm it during the workout.”

Why not take a defensive back?

During the NFL owners meetings this spring, Pace said that the draft's depth of talented options was a factor in free-agency decisions as well as the draft. So his willingness to trade down in the second round of this draft was expected, given that it has been rated as one of the best-ever drafts for quality and depth at defensive back.

Of course, these were the same experts’ analyses that concluded that no quarterback would be drafted before the middle of the first round, when in reality three went in the first 12 picks after teams traded up, so ... oh, never mind.

The NFL collective seems to agree with the take on defensive backs: Of the 107 players selected through three completed rounds, 29 (27.1 percent) have been defensive backs (18 cornerbacks and 11 safeties). Meaning more than one-fourth of the 2017 draft picks have been defensive backs.

What wasn’t expected was Pace then making no move at either cornerback or safety even after the trade-down that recovered much of the draft capital expended to deal up to No. 2 for Mitch Trubisky. When the Bears’ pick at No. 45 came around, the Bears instead chose a smaller-college tight end.

First thoughts were that Pace agreed with thinking that said starter-grade corners in particular could be had as late as the fourth round — he reacquired a fourth-round pick in the trade with Arizona, giving him two (Nos. 117 and 119) — or that he had been outflanked by a sudden minor run on defensive backs. In the eight picks from No. 36 (the Bears’ original second-round slot) to No. 43, four defensive backs were snatched up, three of them safeties.

That clearly didn’t bother Pace, though the Bears ended Friday with a plan to take a revised look in the defensive back direction.

“Yeah, we’re going to have to kind of sort through it tonight and we’ll be here late tonight and early in the morning,” Pace said. “Kind of resetting our board and going through it again. We’re going to take best player available, and if it ends up being offensive players, that’s what it is.”

After fighting through unspeakable adversity, Celtics 'enjoying the moment' with new perspective

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USA TODAY

After fighting through unspeakable adversity, Celtics 'enjoying the moment' with new perspective

Championship moments rarely occur in the first round. With a playoff format that drags the postseason out for more than two months, with playoff series taking as long as two weeks, the second season feels like just that. It’s far too early to say what exactly Friday night in Chicago will mean for the top-seeded Celtics, but a sense of a team coming together under unfathomable circumstances may prove to be the turning point in a season that a week ago appeared hanging by a thread.

It happened in three parts.

On the floor the Celtics looked every bit the part of a 51-win team that edged out LeBron’s Cavs for the top spot in the East. Brad Stevens’ small-ball approach came full-circle as the Boston guards lived in the paint against the Bulls, kicking out to open shooters for 16 3-pointers that helped the Celtics put away the game (and series) midway through the third quarter.

Avery Bradley starred for a second consecutive night, tallying 23 points while making Jimmy Butler work for his, while eight different Celtics hit a 3-pointer and the team shot 49 percent. For the first time in the series the Celtics looked dominant, like a team poised to contend with the Cavaliers for supremacy in the East.

“It felt good to play Celtic basketball again,” Avery Bradley said. “We were all smiling, having fun, and that’s what it’s supposed to be. That’s how hard we worked this entire year, to play that type of basketball.”

Isaiah Thomas was naturally somber much of the series. The well-documented death of his 22-year-old sister put a damper on the series before it began, and the MVP candidate understandably chose not to address it on the few occassions he spoke with the media. But Thomas looked more like himself as the series went on. Not only did his numbers improve, he appeared more vocal after made baskets, laughed off trash talk from Bulls point guard Isaiah Canaan, and engineered the Celtics' offense to near-perfection.

His defining moment came late in the third quarter with the Celtics nearing a 30-point lead. After a hard foul he gathered his four teammates in a huddle near the baseline and shouted that the series for the Bulls was "a wrap for these m------------!" This was the same player who two weeks earlier was brought to tears prior to Game 1, and who will bury his sister on Saturday in Tacoma, Washington. Under unthinkable circumstances, Thomas averaged 23.0 points and 5.7 assists in 34.8 minutes in the series.

“I feel like he has grown,” Al Horford said. "And we all have in a way with all the adversity that has gone on. It could have easily gone the other way, but I feel like especially tonight when we got the game in hand, in control, we all just kept on repeating to stay focused to keep it going, keep pushing. We didn’t want to give them any life and we were a focused group and we were enjoying the moment.”

Thomas' journey won't get easier. He'll have another short turnaround to get ready for Sunday's second-round matchup against the Celtics. But like his teammates did in Games 3 and 4, when Thomas flew by himself to Chicago following his return home to Tacoma to mourn with his family, they'll have another opporuntity to grow closer. Brad Stevens kept an incredible perspective on the situation throughout the series, and applauded his team for doing the same while still fighting for wins.

"Bigger things than basketball happened, and that took precedent and it takes precdedent," he said. "I was really proud of our guys for how they treated each other, how they stood together, stuck together. And how nobody pointed fingers, they were just a great support for one another, especially Isaiah."

When Thomas does return, and when the Celtics gear up for their next postseason journey, expectations will have remained the same. Though the Wizards were one of the league's best teams in the second half, and with John Wall and Bradley Beal playing on another level, it'll take more performances like Friday night - both on the court and collectively staying together - for Boston to advance. A 2-0 hole against the Wizards will feel a whole lot different than it did against the Bulls.

That sort of letdown doesn't feel like it will happen again. Though no one would have wished such tragedy to force it, the Celtics came together at a critical moment and came out better for it. Their work isn't done, and they know it. But the way they were able to handle the adversity in Round 1, anything seems possible for Stevens, Thomas the top seed in the East.

"We just try to stay the course in the day-to-day. And if that results in us winning more games or winning in the playoffs, or whatever the case may be, there’s only one goal in the Boston," Stevens said. "Seventeen (NBA championship) banners above us. We don’t have a choice. We only shoot for one thing there."