Fantasy Baseball Batters Stock Watch

Fantasy Baseball Batters Stock Watch

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Mike Trout, OF, Angels: Normally we don't spend too much time promoting universally-owned players (though we will discuss them while they slump), but we can't ignore what Trout is doing. He's rocking a .345.402.543 slash line, hitting in all venues and against all sorts of pitching. If you project his 54-game clip to a full season, you get this: 144 runs, 24 homers, 96 RBIs, 63 steals. The Angels have bailed out their season, and it's largely due to what Trout has done; right now, he's the frontrunner for AL MVP.
Jason Heyward, OF, Braves: He's driving the ball again (note the .370.395.716 line in June, with six homers) and the Braves have bought in: Heyward is back to the No. 2 slot in the order, where your best batter should hit and where the roto production flows freely. Heyward's healthy shoulder also shows up on defense, as he's been terrific in right field. Very quietly, Atlanta might have the best outfield in the NL (Martin Prado, Michael Bourn and Heyward).

Alcides Escobar, SS, Royals: He's never going to be the prince of patience, but a .315 average and 12 steals certainly play in our formats, and Escobar's excellent defense will keep him on the field. He should eventually develop a little more power as well; think 8-10 jacks a year. In a down year for middle infielders, you could do a lot worse.

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Bryan LaHair, 1BOF, Cubs: He's struggled to hit left-handed pitching all year, and every opposing pitcher has been a hurdle in June (.207.270.397, just three homers, 24 strikeouts). The lofty average and inflated hit rate from April gave roto players a false sense of security: this is a .250-.260 hitter with pop, nothing past that.

Delmon Young, OFDH, Tigers: Why throw him a strike when he'll swing at a ball? Young has just eight free passes this year, against 54 strikeouts, and while a .264 average might not sound like a problem, a .296 OBP and .375 slugging are not playable at an outfield corner (or in the DH spot). The Tigers need to upgrade this position if they fancy themselves legitimate contenders. (And forget about Victor Martinez, at least for 2012: he won't be able to return until mid-September, if at all.)
Brandon Moss, 1B, Athletics: He clubbed a few homers in Colorado two weeks back and people were excited, but the story has quickly collapsed around sea level: Moss has a .171.261.341 slash line since then, with 16 strikeouts in 41 at-bats. Moss is on his fourth MLB organization for a reason - there are plenty of holes in his swing.

Justin Morneau, 1B, Twins: While Target Field isn't a major hurdle for right-handed hitters, it drives a lot of lefties crazy. Consider Morneau, who is a .604 OPS man at home in 2012, compared to a .876 stick on the road. Eight of his ten homers have come away from the home fans. Morneau also needs to take a break against left-handed pitching: they're holding him to a .096 average through 73 at-bats. Don't get tripped up by the name brand here.

Holding Steady
Quintin Berry, OF, Tigers: Apparently the Austin Jackson return wasn't enough to push Berry out of relevance - Jim Leyland is letting them play together. Maybe it's an odd idea to have a punchless stick like Berry taking up residence in left field, but a .316 average and .400 OBP are making Leyland look good. And Berry is 12-for-12 on steals, enjoying the green light. Have some fun with it while it lasts.

The big-picture reasoning behind Rick Renteria and bunting

The big-picture reasoning behind Rick Renteria and bunting

KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- Rick Renteria wants his players to be able to execute a bunt regardless of how much it drives White Sox fans crazy.

The White Sox manager wants to win now, but he’s also looking at the big picture.

Even though he knows how much a team’s chance of scoring decreases when an out is surrendered via the sacrifice bunt, Renteria is using the opportunity to see what abilities his players have. He wants to know what they can do.

Renteria is well aware that his calls for sacrifice bunts aren’t popular with fans (see: Twitter’s reaction to Yoan Moncada’s bunt tries on Saturday). But he also thinks there’s no better time to work on bunts than during a game. So as much fury as it brings, Renteria will continue to ask his players to work on a skill he’d like to see remain part of the game.

“Listen, (Moncada’s) a plus runner,” Renteria said. “He’s going to be able to use that as a part of his arsenal. I see a whole lot of home run hitters dropping bunts right now against shifts and things of that nature. I don’t think that art should disappear. We’re in the era of quote-unquote the long ball, but like I’ve said, sometimes you need to do certain things to kind of put your club in a better position.

"If you think that’s one of the things that’s available to you, you use it. I don’t think you’re necessarily giving it up in terms of an out, because when you’ve got guys who can run anything is possible. You end up loading the bases possibly. I know our guys are very cognizant of just playing the game. If they feel like they want to get two guys in scoring position on their own, they do it. It’s not something I want to take away from them. I think they read the defenses. Sometimes we talk about other ways of dealing with the defenses, but I think they’re understanding that we’re going to want that to be a part of all their abilities.”

As for the team’s execution, Renteria isn’t satisfied with the results. That means you can expect to see more bunts the rest of the way.

“It’s still a work-in-progress,” Renteria said. “I think that would be a falsehood to say we’re at the point where I go, I’m very, very happy with the way we lay down bunts. It’s still a work-in-progress, something that we’re going to continue to emphasize. Something we’re going to continue to work on. And then again, the only opportunities you get in real time are games, and that’s when you need ‘em.”

White Sox manager Rick Renteria 'surprised' Melky Cabrera hasn't been traded

White Sox manager Rick Renteria 'surprised' Melky Cabrera hasn't been traded

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — The White Sox have offloaded more pieces in the past eight months than that furniture store that always seems to be going out of business.

Everything. Must. Go.

Even so, the team hasn’t found any takers for veteran outfielder Melky Cabrera, who finished with four hits in Saturday night’s 7-2 White Sox loss to the Kansas City Royals. Cabrera finished a triple shy of the cycle and drove in two runs. That Cabrera still resides on the South Side is a surprise to White Sox manager Rick Renteria.

“Honestly yeah, to be honest,” Renteria said. “To me he’s a premier Major League baseball player who has been playing outstanding defense. And he has been for us one of the two or three guys who has been timing his hitting in terms of driving in runs when we need them, putting together really good at-bats when we need them. Just playing the game. Yeah, kind of surprised.”

Despite making their intentions known that everyone short of Tim Anderson and Carlos Rodon are available, Cabrera’s name has barely registered a blip on the radar when it comes to trade rumors.

Several factors have probably prevented Cabrera from being dealt, the biggest being his salary. Cabrera is still owed roughly $6.3 million of his $15 million salary, which makes him an expensive option.

Defensive metrics also don’t have much love for Cabrera despite his eight outfield assists. Cabrera’s lack of range has produced minus-6 Defensive Runs Saved and a minus-4.7 Ultimate Zone Rating.

Those figures likely would like have teams lean toward making Cabrera a designated hitter. While he’s been one of the team’s most consistent and prominent offensive performers, Cabrera’s .786 ranks only about 38th in the American League.

As FanRag’s Jon Heyman noted earlier Saturday, to trade Cabrera the White Sox would likely have to eat most of the outfielder’s remaining salary.