Fantasy baseball hitter stocks

Fantasy baseball hitter stocks

By David Ferris
CSNChicago.com

Buy

Carlos Gomez, OF, Brewers: He's still swinging from his heels like he's the second coming of Jose Canseco, but after a sizzling July (.274, five homers, 11 steals), we'll leave him alone. Gomez can take a bag almost any time he likes (he's 19-for-23 on the year) and the Brewers are letting him bat in the No. 2 slot, even with his lack of patience. Power and speed combos are wonderful rotisserie finds, no matter how much batting-average risk you might be taking on.

Travis Snider, OF, Pirates: Get out the post-hype sleeper file, it's time for another entry. Snider was considered a Top 10 prospect as recently as 2009, but let's not call him a bust today - he's still just 24. We saw Snider mashing Triple-A pitching over the last few years (a .333.412.565 slash gets your attention) and the Bucs are going to use him every day and perhaps slot him leadoff as well. Sometimes a change of scenery is all a young player needs to get over the hump.

Ryan Ludwick, OF, Reds: He's cracked 13 homers over the last two months and yet he's unowned in over 85 percent of Yahoo! leagues. A home address in hitter-friendly Cincinnati is a good start for Ludwick, and his average actually jumps 57 points on the road. You can buy in and trust him as a regular, Dusty Baker already has. Swing for the fences.

Sell

Marco Scutaro, Utility, Giants: San Francisco should have realized the pitfalls of Scutaro - his home OPS is 245 points higher this season, a clear residual from Coors Field. The Giants will welcome Scutaro's versatility and professionalism, but they shouldn't be using him near the top of the lineup.

Pedro Ciriaco, Utility, Red Sox: The .348 average and six steals sound nice, but Ciriaco is the type of hack-first batter that tends to get figured out quickly by opposing pitching staffs. Ciriaco only had six walks in 289 plate-appearances at Triple-A this year, and he spent eight seasons in the minors for a reason. There's nothing long-term to grab onto here.

Anthony Gose, OF, Blue Jays: The 21-year-old hasn't done much in his first go-round, just 5-for-28 since joining the club (with 12 strikeouts). He's flashed elite speed at every minor-league level, but there's still no way to swipe first base in this game. When Jose Bautista is ready to play again, Gose probably slides to the bench (or to the minors).

Hold

Eric Hosmer, 1B, Royals: Despite a static line-drive rate and KBB ratios, Hosmer has dropped 62 BABIP points this year. His HRFB clip is down three percent as well. This has fluke written all over it, and it's a perfect time to quietly make an inquiry for Hosmer in your keeper league.

Delmon Young, OF, Tigers: His fundamentals are all over the place, but at least he's been more selective of late (a season-high six walks in July). And Young's connections have also been fun: five homers last month, and strong run-production stats in the middle of Detroit's deep lineup. Young can't play the outfield to save his life, but the Tigers DH him about 75 percent of the time. Not a bad support bat for the end of your roster.

2017 NFL Draft Profile: California QB Davis Webb

2017 NFL Draft Profile: California QB Davis Webb

As part of our coverage leading up to the 2017 NFL Draft we will provide profiles of more than 100 prospects, including a scouting report and video interviews with each player.

Davis Webb, QB, California

6'5" | 229 lbs.

2016 stats:

4,295 YDS, 61.6 CMP%, 37 TD, 12 INT, 135.6 QBR

Projection:

Day 3

Scouting Report:

"System quarterback with more than 65 percent of his attempts coming inside of 10 yards. Webb has enough raw talent to be considered a developmental prospect, but his decision-making and accuracy issues beyond 10 yards is a big red flag that might be tough to overcome in the NFL." — Lance Zierlein, NFL.com

Video analysis provided by Rotoworld and NBC Sports NFL Draft expert Josh Norris.

Click here for more NFL Draft Profiles

Owners to consider on and off field changes this week during NFL meetings

Owners to consider on and off field changes this week during NFL meetings

Give the NFL credit for, at least this one time, genuinely putting the interests of its fans first. Or at least proposing to.

Among the matters expected to come before this week’s owners meetings in Arizona will be one from Washington that coaches have the ability to make unlimited replay challenges as long as the ones they make are correct. The idea is not likely to pass, in part because the NFL is endeavoring to improve the pace of its games, particularly for fans seated in stadiums, particularly outdoor ones. (If you’re watching at home, replay reviews are enough time to fill the chips bowl and grab a cold one.)

Along that line, the plan is for tablet computers to be run out to game officials for their review and consultation, while the final decision is reached at league officiating headquarters in New York, according to current proposals to be considered for votes this week. Additionally, a 40-second play clock is suggested after extra points when there is no commercial break scheduled, and halftime to be limited to 13 minutes 30 seconds.

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Actual in-game changes are also under consideration.

No one is likely to label it “The McClellin Rule” but a proposal is there to ban players leaping over offensive linemen (read: long snappers) to block field goals and extra points. Former Bears linebacker Shea, as a special-teams rusher with the New England Patriots, successfully vaulted Ravens blockers to knock down a Baltimore field goal try last season.

The proposal is likely to pass ostensibly as a player-safety measure, although cynics might suggest that the impetus behind the ban is general irritation that Bill Belichick’s group came up with with kick-block gambit.

More directly aimed at protecting players from gratuitous violence in a game that has enough violence just by its nature is a move to remind officials that players can be ejected for egregiously illegal hits. The situation is not considered dire because of frequency but the league clearly wants to send a message/reminder to not only officials, but players, something likely to be reinforced during officials’ tours of training camps in August.