Frankie O: The case for Woody

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Frankie O: The case for Woody

By Frankie O
CSNChicago.com

In the first winter of the Great Cubs Experiment fans have been eagerly dissecting every move of the Epstein Regime. Im very surprisednot surprised at the reactions Ive been getting at the bar. This has been, so far, a nuke job of the roster and not surprising. After watching what transpired on the field last year, many are happy with that. Very happy. But at the same time, folks have to still pay top dollar to have a front row seat to the laying of the foundation for the end of 104 years, and counting, misery. Ive listened to many season ticket holders about their unhappiness with a lack of return in their investment. Fans want to be part of something good, but at what cost? Going to a game at Wrigley never gets old, but as weve watched in the last 2 Augusts and Septembers, decisions have been made to do other things.

As I look at the latest cash grab up north of the Green Bay Packers though, I begin to wonder. The Packers are having another of their stock offerings where fans have the ability to own a piece of paper, for 250. Whatever! Not to be too greedy, the Packers set an individual limit of 200. How nice! Someone can own 50,000 worth of paper, plus 25 shipping and handling, to show how dedicated they are to the cause. (I think Im more outraged at the 25 bucks. How much can it cost to put someones name on a piece of paper and mail it to them?) The demand has been so great that the team has added 30,000 more to the announced limit of 250,000. That would put the total of the offering at 70 million. And people from Philly are crazy?

I bring this up because, in my opinion, almost everyone is on board here with the transformation that is occurring and the Cubs faithful has been categorized as the most faithful in sports. Of course, the cynic in me cant help but point out that this is the offseason! Once the season starts, and the losses mount, they might be whistling a different tune. It rhymes with Lou. Life is always easy in Theory. Are Cubs fans going to be willing to keep on parting with their hard earned cash for the product they are watching on the field, when they understand they have no chance of competing? Theyre not from Wisconsin!

That is why I think that maybe the new bosses should throw the nostalgic masses a bone.

There are only a handful of Cubs who have captured the imagination of the fans the way Kerry Wood has. With his blazing fastball and quiet demeanor, he burst on the scene and achieved national stardom with his 20 strikeout game in 1998.

I remember that game, but for a different reason.

That spring training, the media was abuzz about the young flame-thrower. He was left off the opening day roster though and did not make his first appearance until April 12th. His first 3 starts were what you would expect of a rookie, 11 innings, never going more than 5 in earning a 1-2 record. Then in his 4th start at home against the St. Louis Cardinals, there was a flash of what made him the 4th overall pick of the 1995 amateur draft. Seven innings pitched, one run allowed and nine ks in an 8-3 win. I was hooked. The fastball! The curve! This kid was big-time! The following Tuesday night was a Harry Carays employee outing in the bleachers at Wrigley.

That would be Tuesday May 5, 1998. To say that we enjoyed a few beverages would be typical understatement on my part. After the game, it came to me that Wood was pitching the next afternoon. Discussing this with a friend at a local establishment, I argued that we had to go see him pitch since it was a day game, the weather was going to be iffy and it would be easy to get tickets. If he pitched like his previous outing, he was going to become the next big thing, and getting to see him would be much more difficult. My friend argued that in my euphoric state that he didnt see any way that I would be able to get up in time and come back into the city to go to the game. As my phone rang the next morning, repeatedly, I was furious that my friend was correct and that this was a game that I would be watching on the TV. Although, I did find time to pick up the phone during the last call I received to express my feelings about his being right in two succinct words. As I tortured myself on the treadmill, while watching the game, to get rid of the evil spirits that where inhabiting my body, the game I was watching was making me feel even sicker. Strikeout after strikeout, in the most dominating game I ever watched. I had to turn it off. I did however listen to the rest of the game on my way into work. 20 strikeouts, no walks and one UGH! Upon arriving, everyone at the restaurant was buzzing and there were three TV stations interviewing customers to get their reactions to one of the biggest days in Cubs history. Did you see it?! Did you see it?!! Yeah, I saw it, now leave me alone! Man, was I ticked-off. I was sure that something was going to happen, and I was right, now I was being mocked about it everywhere I turned. Oh well. At least I have a story to tell when I want people to laugh at me!

This was the beginning of Woods status of not just being another player. Although the progression of his career was not what everyone expected or predicted, due to injury or whatever else, he always maintained that status. He had an aura and a mystique to accompany that right arm.

Something I witnessed later that year forever endeared him to me. My father and brother were in town and we went to a Cubs game that was honoring Harry. We arrived inside Wrigley early so that we could get on the field to have a picture taken, because thats how I roll! My father and brother were wearing new Cubs hats that they had purchased on the way to the stadium. Waiting to get onto the field, we were sitting in the first row of seats almost behind home plate on the Cubs side of the field. At this time rookie-phenom Wood was doing some PR work with some bankers, throwing a ceremonial pitch and having his picture taken. In the meantime, a crowd of youngsters, including my brother, had gathered near the home plate entrance to the Cubs dugout in hopes of getting an autograph.

Upon completion of his work duties with the giddy bankers (Wood fever had caught the entire populace of Chicago) he stopped to oblige the youthful mass on his way into the dugout. My brother came back beaming with his new hat having a pretty cool autograph on it. One that was so cool that a Phillies fan wouldnt get a ton of grief for possessing it. The old man, realizing this point, decided that he would go over and get his signed too. It was comical watching Wood pass over my father time after time, to sign something for a kid. Understanding that it wasnt going to happen, my father backed out of the throng and started his way back. At this point a little guy in the group saw what was happening and told my father to hold on and give the hat to him. As soon as the kid got back in line it was signed. I love the fact that Wood signed for every kid there and wouldnt sign for an old dude who was a Phillies fan, not falling for the subterfuge of him holding a Cubs hat!

I never saw him in person until many years later. Just over a year ago as a matter of fact, at the after funeral reception at Harry Carays for Ron Santo. As he approached the bar, my work wife and I said hello and asked teasingly if he had signed a contract for the 2011 season. We asked knowing that he was a free-agent and everybody who was a fan of the Cubs, including the late Ronnie, would like to see him back in a Cubbies uniform. The sheepish smile he gave the two of us got us thinking, Wow, maybe he will be back. His signing was announced less than a week later and Jim Hendry said their conversation at the reception was where their talks to bring him back started.
But that wasnt hard to guess. He belongs here. The symmetry between him and the Cubs is undeniable.

By this time Id become a fan of his for another reason. I know hes not the only one, not even on his own team, but for purpose of this post, Ill focus on his charitable endeavors. I think because Ive watched him here since he was 20, and have watched him grow into manhood it really resonates.

I dont know when the point is that you get it but he certainly does. I know for myself it was when my children were born. Maybe not so coincidentally, once he got married and had children, Wood has become a charitable force. According to his website, his Kerry Wood Strike Zone Celebrity Bowling Tournament has raised over 2 million for Childrens Memorial Hospital and other Chicago charities. Upon his arrival with the Cubs last year, he and his wife launched The Wood Family Foundation, in which they hope to improve the lives of children in and around the Chicago area through children's charities. You look at the picture of him and his family in the foundation website and its everything that anyone would want in life. And by reading their comments throughout the website, you can feel their need to share their good fortune. The benefit that the Wood family is having on others is admirable and undeniable.

What I also would term as undeniable would be Kid Ks effect on this years Cubs roster. When I first moved here, the Cubs Cub was Mark Grace. Not only was he good, he seemed to do things the right way. A gamer. He was also an influence on the young Kerry Wood, imparting his years of baseball wisdom. I always perceived that hitters wanted nothing to do with pitchers and vice-versa, but these two are so cool, it seemed a natural fit, and you would see them together often.

With this years edition primed to be one of the youngest weve seen in a long time, it only makes sense that the veterans chosen to stay are the right ones. New manager Dale Sveums comments about the apathy he perceived in the Cubs dugout in years past as viewed from across the field is something that is no longer going to be accepted, by anyone, since we have been promised more. What some of the youngsters on the Cubs are going to need is a no-nonsense, modern day, Crash Davis, someone who can appreciate the ups and downs of playing in the Show, someone who knows how to successfully navigate all of the obstacles in playing for the Chicago Cubs.

No one disputes that this is going to take a while, the path of developing young talent always does. In the meantime though, their need to be leaders, on the team and in the field, veterans that have earned the trust of management and the ticket-buying public alike, to show the way forward.

As I read in the papers this week what I consider a game of chicken, I dont get it. I know the mantra for the Epstein lead management is not to pay for past performance, and I get this, if youre talking about A-Rod or Albert Pujols or Alfonso Soriano(!), but they all make mega-mega millions. Were talking here about a set-up reliever that ALL sides agree took less than market value to play here last year. Why not consider that when offering a 2 year deal for appropriate money that would benefit everyone involved. The Cubs are better with Kerry Wood here. Chicago is better with him here as well

Wake-up Call: Miggy gets the boot; Rodon's rocky debut; More bad news for Cubs?

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AP

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White Sox willing to overlook 'rough' patches as healthy Carlos Rodon returns

White Sox willing to overlook 'rough' patches as healthy Carlos Rodon returns

The two fastballs that soared to the backstop on Wednesday night should give you a strong indication that Carlos Rodon was far from perfect.

But in making his first start of the 2017 season, the White Sox pitcher also offered his team plenty of signals that his health isn’t going to be an issue.

Rodon returned to the mound for the first time since last September and brought the goods that made him one of baseball’s top pitching prospects several years ago. Given he’d missed three months with bursitis in the left shoulder and the potential value he offers to a franchise only half a season into its first rebuild in 20 years, that was plenty for the White Sox to overlook the rust Rodon showed in a 12-3 White Sox loss to the New York Yankees at Guaranteed Rate Field.

“He started a little rough early obviously, got some high pitch counts,” manager Rick Renteria said. “And then he kind of settled down.

“Having him back in the rotation and getting him back out there on the big league field, coming out of there feeling good, healthy. I'm sure he will continue to get better as he continues to get out there and move forward.”

Renteria said he wasn’t surprised that Rodon struggled with his command as much as he did against the Yankees. The issues the pitcher displayed in uncorking a pair of wild pitches, walking six batters and throwing strikes on only 41 of 94 pitches were also present during Rodon’s four rehab starts in the minors.

But as long as the stuff was there, the White Sox would be OK with any issues that accompanied the performance. Rodon began to alleviate those concerns immediately when he earned a called strike on the game’s first pitch with a 93-mph fastball to Brett Gardner. Featuring a four-seamer with an absurd amount of movement and a nasty slider he struggled to control, Rodon checked all the boxes the White Sox hoped for from a pitcher they believe will be a frontline starter for years to come. Rodon also was pleased by how he felt before, during and after the contest.

“I was pretty excited,” Rodon said. “I was going a little fast in the first. But it was good to be out there. Next time out, it’ll hopefully be a little better. Arm feels good, body feels good, all you can ask for.”

Well, it’s not ALL you can ask for, but it’s pretty damn good out of the gate given how slow Rodon’s return took. His four-seam fastball averaged 94.9 mph according to BrooksBaseball.Net and touched 97 mph. His two-seamer averaged 94.4 mph and touched 95. And his slider, though he couldn’t control it, nor locate it for a strike, averaged 86 mph.

“You could see (Omar Narvaez) going over to try to catch some balls that were having tremendous run,” Renteria said. “That's (Rodon). He's got some tremendous life, he's just trying to harness it the best that he can and being able to execute where he wants to get as many strikes as possible.”

[VIVID SEATS: Get your White Sox tickets here]

The strikes were about the only thing Rodon didn’t bring with him. He walked Gardner to start the game and issued two more free passes after a Tim Anderson error allowed a run to score and extended the first inning. Rodon threw 37 pitches in the first, only 15 for strikes.

He also reached a full count to each of the batters he faced in the second inning. Rodon walked two more with two outs in the third inning after he’d retired six batters in a row.

And there were those pesky first-inning wild pitches that resembled something out of ‘Bull Durham.’

But all in all, Rodon and the White Sox ultimately saw enough in the first outing to be pleased.

“Great stuff, great life, but the goal is to put it in the zone and let them swing it to get guys out early,” Rodon said. “That’s not what happened. I’ll get back to that.”

“It’s a tough loss, but it’s better to be with the guys out on the field grinding than sitting on the couch and watching, for sure.”