Groce trying to reinvigorate a young Illinois squad

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Groce trying to reinvigorate a young Illinois squad

ROSEMONT Every coach seems giddy at the beginning of a new season.

Illinois coach John Groce says hes having a blast, even at practice.

Groce, who replaced the fired Bruce Weber in March, has been impressed with the enthusiasm of his new team.

Its been maybe as fun as any time Ive been in coaching to go to practice, said Groce, who was the head coach at Ohio University. Theyre excited to be there. Theyre passionate. They want to learn. They have exceeded my expectations in that regard.

Likewise, Groce has made his objectives known. At Thursdays Big Ten Media Day, Illinois players Brandon Paul and D.J. Richardson wore orange wristbands with the inscriptions TNT which stands for toughness and togetherness, as well as the opening date of the NCAA tournament.

Groce, 41, will try to reinvigorate a team that lost 12 of its final 14 games last season to finish 17-15 and ninth in the Big Ten, missing the postseason. The Illini return four starters.

We really appreciate them wanting to come here and help us get better and back on track, said Paul, a senior guard. Coach Groce is real animated and thats something thats helped us. He brings so much energy to the table. We come to practice and were really energetic. Everyones talking to each other. Everyones helping each other out.

Richardson said the young coaching staff relates to the players, and those coaches frequently use social media. Richardson also appreciated that Groce took the time to call players family members after he was hired Groce phoned Richardsons parents and uncle.

I say to the staff all the time, The first step to reaching our potential is getting to know our team and getting to know our individual players at a high level, Groce said.

Groces resume has also commanded respect from the Illini players. As the No. 13 seed in the 2012 NCAA tournament under Groce, Ohio upset fourth-seeded Michigan and fell to top-seeded North Carolina in overtime in the Sweet 16. Groce went 85-56 at Ohio and he was previously an assistant at Ohio State, Xavier and Butler.

We have to listen to what Coach says, Richardson said. Hes been to the NCAA tournament a lot of times. He knows whats he talking about, especially with a team like Ohio. They beat Michigan in the NCAA tournament, and we lost to them twice last year. He knows what hes talking about.

Illinois is new territory. Groce said the Illini fans are unbelievable in their support, and he has received standing ovations in front of hundreds of supporters at community events. He wants to continue to make a mark with recruiting in Chicago, signing the right ones.

At Ohio, he said he was focused on his team playing tough, being disruptive on defense and taking care of the ball. That carries over to Illinois.

I think about the 05-06 team we had at Ohio State. I want to say that team was picked maybe ninth or 10th (in the Big Ten), and they won the league, Groce said. Im more concerned about process and doing things the right way and getting caught up in the journey.

Cubs not worrying about a thing after split with Marlins: 'We're right there'

Cubs not worrying about a thing after split with Marlins: 'We're right there'

MIAMI – Jon Jay walked into a quiet clubhouse late Sunday morning, turned right and headed directly toward the sound system in one corner of the room, plugging his phone into the sound system and playing Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds.”

The Cubs outfielder whistled as he changed into his work clothes at Marlins Park, singing along to the lyrics with Anthony Rizzo a few lockers over: “Don’t worry, about a thing, ‘cause every little thing gonna be all right.” 

That’s what the Cubs keep telling themselves, because most of them have World Series rings and the National League Central is such a bad division.

“The biggest thing is to keep the floaties on until we get this thing right,” manager Joe Maddon said before a 4-2 loss left the Cubs treading water again at 38-37. “We’re solvent. We’re right there. We’re right next to first place.”

The Cubs will leave this tropical environment and jump into the deep end on Monday night for the start of a four-game showdown against the Washington Nationals in the nation’s capital.

Miami sunk the Cubs in the first inning when Addison Russell made a costly error on the routine groundball Miami leadoff guy Ichiro Suzuki chopped to shortstop, a mistake that helped create three unearned runs. Martin Prado drilled Mike Montgomery’s first-pitch fastball off the left-center field wall for a two-out double and a 3-0 lead. Montgomery (1-4, 2.03 ERA) lasted six innings and retired the last 10 batters he faced.

“Keep The Floaties On” sounds like an idea for Maddon’s next T-shirt. The 2017 Cubs haven’t been more than four games over .500 or two games under .500 at any point this season. The 2016 Cubs didn’t lose their 37th game until July 19 and spent 180 days in first place.

“That’s what was so special about it,” Rizzo said. “We boat-raced from Game 1 to Game 7 with a couple bumps in the road, but this is baseball. It’s not going to be all smooth-sailing every day. You got to work through things.”

As MLB addresses long game times, why Mark Buehrle’s zippy pace is worth highlighting

As MLB addresses long game times, why Mark Buehrle’s zippy pace is worth highlighting

Sometime in the future, near or far, Major League Baseball will probably begin using a pitch clock to penalize sluggish hitters and pitchers.

The sport without a clock will, someday, have a clock. ESPN’s Tim Kurkjian offered that as one of his predictions for what baseball could look like 20 years from now, which would be one of Rob Manfred’s signature reforms as commissioner. 

This kind of change wouldn’t be necessary, though, if more pitchers were like Mark Buehrle. 

“Buehrle was hyper,” pitching coach Don Cooper said. “He wanted to go, go, go.”

No pitcher since 2007 — when Pitch F/X began calculating “pace” — worked faster than Buehrle, who averaged 16.7 seconds between pitches. Only 56 qualified pitchers since 2007 can be considered to work “fast,” i.e. with an average time between pitches of 20 seconds or fewer (it’s a list that includes fellow former White Sox left-handers John Danks and Chris Sale). And that’s only 12 percent of the 473 qualified pitchers in the last decade.

Buehrle’s 99-minute complete game against the Seattle Mariners in 2005 still is the only nine-inning contest to be completed in fewer than 100 minutes since 1984. There was that memorable 1:53 duel with Mark Mulder and the Oakland A’s in 2003, and both Buehrle’s perfect game and no hitter lasted 2:03. 

Of course, Buehrle didn’t just work quick, he pitched well while zipping through innings. Buehrle finished his career with a 3.81 ERA, made four All-Star teams and threw at least 200 innings every year from 2001-2014. He had a .572 career winning percentage, too, so Cooper knew about Buehrle would give the White Sox a chance to win in about six out of every 10 starts.

“But you also know it’s going to be about two hours and 10 minutes, too,” Cooper added. 

A given game’s length isn’t all about the pace of the pitcher, of course. Batters can slow things down by stepping out of the box and calling for time, and games can feel like a slog with replay delays and mid-inning pitching changes. 

Still, how quickly a pitcher works usually dictates the pace of a game and how long it takes to be completed. Cooper wondered why hitters didn’t step out more against Buehrle to disrupt his rhythm, but perhaps the answer is that everyone on the field gets caught up in the quick pace set by the pitcher. 

“Everybody tells me they were so happy when I pitched for a quick game, but every time I was on the bench in between my starts, it was a 3, 3 1/2 hour game and it wasn't very much fun,” Buehrle said. “I think some of these games do get too long. Pitchers take their time, hitters get out of the box. I don't get all that but that's just the way I worked. I just grabbed the ball and went.”

Maybe adding a pitch clock with penalties affecting the count will force pitchers and hitters to find a quicker rhythm. That was one of the hallmarks of Buehrle’s career, and those snappy starts are one of the reasons why No. 56 was such a popular player on 35th and Shields. 

Former manager Ozzie Guillen, in summing up Buehrle's mentality, also offered some free advice for fixing baseball's pace-of-play problem: “Just throw the ball, get people out and have fun.”