Heisman goes to Manziel, but Te'o continues to build legacy

959303.png

Heisman goes to Manziel, but Te'o continues to build legacy

Manti Te'o used to make himself a running back playing video games growing up, barreling over defenses with the flick of a joystick or the push of a button. That was supposed to be the only way a linebacker would ever have a chance at winning the Heisman Trophy, in a virtual world in which he could play offense.

Johnny Manziel won the Heisman Trophy Saturday night, so perhaps that path for defensive players still holds true. But Teo made it farther in the process than all but two purely-defensive players in the Heismans 78-year history. Only Pittsburghs Hugh Green and Iowas Alex Karras -- yes, that Alex Karras -- finished as high as Teos second-place finish in 2012.

Never in my life would I have thought that it would become a reality where I would even be mentioned with the name Heisman, Teo said earlier in the year.

Undoubtedly, Teo is disappointed to not win college footballs most prestigious honor. He told reporters before the ceremony he didnt come to New York to finish second, just like he repeated all year that he didnt get this far in Notre Dames season to not win the BCS Championship. But there was no pass to be intercepted or goal-line tackle to be made Saturday. The winner of the Heisman Trophy was decided days ago, and all Teo could do is sit and watch the result unfold.

If a guy like Manti Te'o's not going to win the Heisman, they should just make it an offensive award, coach Brian Kelly said after Notre Dame beat USC, pitching his linebacker as the Irish celebrated a trip to South Florida. Just give it to the offensive player every year and let's just cut to the chase. He is the backbone of a 12-0 football team that has proven itself each and every week. If the Heisman Trophy is what it is, I don't know how Manti Te'o is left out of that conversation.

Te'o was hardly left out of the conversation, though. He finished second with 1,706 points -- only about 300 fewer than Manziel, and the most points by a purely-defensive player ever. The fact he was even in it, with many voters shunning the idea of casting a vote for a defensive player, is an extraordinary feat on its own.

Inside the Irish: Even without Heisman, Te'o's season one for the ages

But Te'o's impact wasnt just about the stats -- 103 tackles, 7 interceptions -- it was about being the emotional leader of the nations No. 1 scoring defense. It was about his play against Michigan State and Michigan while dealing with personal tragedy. It was his impact in the community, his integrity, his status as a legitimate role model.

He lives his life the right way, Kelly said. He goes to class. He takes great care of himself off the field. He's a college student. He can laugh and have fun and be silly. He can be tough.

He's just all that you would want in a young man as a college student and a representative of Notre Dame.

That impact couldnt be measured. Manziels 4,600 yards of total offense and 43 touchdowns while playing in the nations best conference, though, was an easy talking point. Theres little debating those numbers -- and make no mistake, Manziel is a deserving player to become the first redshirt freshman to win the Heisman Trophy.

Related: Te'o makes history with sixth award

But just because Manziel deserved the Heisman didnt mean Te'o wasnt deserving, either.

I tell people, they think it's all about stats, Notre Dame defensive tackle Louis Nix explained Friday. Me, I actually went on the Heisman website and read the mission statement. And it basically has Manti's picture next to it.

People want to talk about stats, all these other players up for the Heisman, they're great players. But Manti, on and off the field, he's that guy. He has integrity, he's athletic, he's one of the best guys you'll ever meet. I don't take that away from any other player, but I think Manti is the Heisman. I think he should win it.

For Te'o, though, the grand prize is still out there, well within his reach. He wanted to win the Heisman Trophy, but hed rather win the BCS Championship.

I rather be holding a crystal ball than a bronze statue, Teo said earlier in the year. That's just me.

Few expected Notre Dame to participate in the National Championship when fall camp opened in August -- not even their athletic director, Jack Swarbrick, who thought Notre Dames year was going to be 2013. Even fewer (try anyone) thought of Teo as a Heisman Trophy candidate.

But Te'o still had a legacy to secure entering his senior season, one that didnt involve a trip to New York for the Heisman ceremony. Notre Dame hadnt been elite on a national stage in nearly two decades, and hadnt won a title since 1988. This years team brought the Irish back with defense, and with Teo as its backbone.

He is the perfect guy to lead the resurrection of this program, Swarbrick said in November.

Thats Te'o's legacy, and one that still has one more chapter to be written next month. The Heisman Trophy wasnt crucial to it. A National Championship, though, would vault Teos legacy to rarified air among Notre Dames elite.

When you're a champion at other schools, you're a champion, Te'o explained, but when you're a champion at Notre Dame, you become a legend.

Wake-up Call: Comeback Cubs; White Sox lose eighth straight game

Wake-up Call: Comeback Cubs; White Sox lose eighth straight game

Kris Bryant ignites World Series nostalgia with Cubs' epic eighth-inning comeback

What White Sox shortstop Tim Anderson is doing to combat second-year struggles

Familiar problems for Fire in loss at New York City FC

After losing uncle, emotional Jon Lester pays tribute with Notre Dame rallying cry

How Yoan Moncada's first hit stacks up against all-time White Sox greats

For the Blackhawks defense, change is the new normal

With Kyle Hendricks back in the mix, Cubs set rotation for Crosstown series with White Sox

Blackhawks: Tommy Wingels fractures foot, will be ready for training camp

Freak of nature: Kris Bryant wows again with insane healing ability

Royals think White Sox have done 'phenomenal job' acquiring young talent

Royals think White Sox have done 'phenomenal job' acquiring young talent

KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Only six years after they had the “best farm system of all time,” the Kansas City Royals see a bright future ahead for the upstart White Sox.

Several current Kansas City players who graduated from that farm system and led the Royals to a 2015 World Series title and manager Ned Yost all said they’re intrigued by how quickly the White Sox have built up their minor league talent.

Through four major trades and the signing of international free agent Luis Robert, the White Sox boast a system that features 10 top-10 prospects, according to MLBPipeline.com. Baseball America ranks eight White Sox prospects in their top 100. While the system isn’t yet ready to compete with the 2011 Royals for the unofficial title of best ever, it’s pretty impressive nonetheless.

“Have you seen what they’ve gotten back from tearing it down?” Yost said. “MLB ranks the top 100 prospects. Most teams have one or two. I don’t think we have any. They have 10. They’ve done a phenomenal job of restocking their system with incredibly talented young players.”

Not everything is identical between how these organizations built their farms.

The Royals headed into 2011 with nine top-100 prospects and five in the top 20 alone (Eric Hosmer 8, Mike Moustakas 9, Wil Myers 10, John Lamb 18, Mike Montgomery 19). The Kansas City Star in 2016 reviewed the best-ranked systems of all-time and determined by a point value system (100 points for the No. 1 prospect and one point for the No. 100 prospect) that the 2011 club was better than all others with 574 points.

But that group was the byproduct of a painstaking stretch in which the Royals averaged 96 losses from 2004-12. The slower path taken by Kansas City allowed its young core to develop and learn how to play together in the minors. As pitcher Danny Duffy noted, “we went to the playoffs every year.”

They won at Rookie-Burlington, Double-A Northwest Arkansas and Triple-A Omaha took home three titles. Working together was a big key to the team’s success at the major league level, said catcher Salvador Perez.

“We didn’t come from different teams,” Perez said. “We all came from here. We had a young team together. We learned how to win and win in the big leagues.

“We learned how to win together, play together and play for the team. It was really important.”

The only time the Royals didn’t win was at Advance-A Wilmington Blue Rocks, Duffy said.

“You learn how success feels and how some failure feels,” Duff said. “We lost in Wilmington and you would have thought the world was coming to an end.”

According to the Star, the Royals haven’t had much recent competition for the best system. Until now.

The 2006 Diamondbacks accrued 541 points and the 2000 Florida Marlins had 472. The 2015 Cubs scored 450 points.

After the addition of Blake Rutherford on Tuesday (the No. 36 prospect on BA’s current top 100 list), the White Sox have 483 points. But the 2017 Atlanta Braves are even better with 532 points, the third-highest total of all-time.

The White Sox farm system has created excitement among the fan base that had wavered in recent years. Not everyone is on board, but the majority seems to be and that can create hysteria.

“We had people at the games who were super excited about the wave of prospects,” Duffy said. “Obviously they have a stacked system over there, very similar to what we had coming up. There was a lot of excitement. It was crazy.”

But excitement didn’t immediately translate into victories. Though a fair amount of the 2011 class graduated to the majors by later that season, the Royals didn’t get on track in the big leagues for a few years.

It wasn’t until the second half of 2013 that the Royals got going. The 2014 club ended a 29-year playoff drought with a wild-card berth that led to an American League pennant. They followed that up with a World Series title in 2015. Had it not been for a Herculean effort by Madison Bumgarner, Kansas City might have had consecutive titles.

Still, getting there takes time.

“The first thing you had to do was get them here,” Yost said. “Experience has taught me that it’s generally 2 1/2 years before they can get to a point where they can compete. They just have to gain that experience at the major league level because it’s definitely a much more difficult style of play up here. The talent is just so incredibly good that it takes a while for talent or players to adjust to where they’re productive. It just takes time then being able to go out and play every single day.”

Even though that means the White Sox will experience difficult times the next few years, Duffy and Co. think it’s worth the wait. While Duffy imagines losing Jose Quintana and David Robertson and Tommy Kahnle and Todd Frazier isn’t fun, he has a good sense what is headed this direction.

“Losing Quintana stings, but they got a king’s ransom back,” Duffy said. “It’s the way of the game. But they’re going to have a really good time in the next few years.”